Damian Kristof: Blue Zones, Stress Reduction Strategies & Avoiding Nutritional 'Scare' | 180 Nutrition

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Damian Kristof: Blue Zones, Stress Reduction Strategies & Avoiding Nutritional ‘Scare’

Damian Kristof (1)

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Guy:  This week we welcome to the show Damian Kristof. He has a wealth of experience with 20 years in the health industry. He’s a nutritionist, naturopath, and a chiropractor. He’s also a highly sought-after presenter and speaker in the wellness industry.

On top of that, he has two successful podcast; The Wellness Guys & 100 Not Out. We had a lot of fun delving into topics from his time in the blue zone (the island of Ikaria), to the chemical – physical – emotional components of stress, to his views on nutrition. Enjoy…

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Audio Version

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Itunes logoListen to StitcherQuestions we ask in this episode:

  • What are the philosophies behind chiropractic health, and should everyone have a checkup?
  • Stress. You talk about the emotional – chemical – physical components. Please explain.
  • What are your stress reduction strategies (For emotional – chemical – physical)?
  • You talk about nutritional care not ‘scare’. Please explain.
  • Ikaria – the island where people forget to die. What would be the top 5 things you learned from them?
  • What are your non-negotiable practices?

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Full Transcript

Guy:

Hi. This is Guy Lawrence of 180 Nutrition. Welcome to another episode of The Health Sessions, where we cut through the confusion by connecting with leading global health and wellness experts to share the best and the latest science and thinking, empowering people to turn their health and lives around.

We are doing it this week with the super fantastic Mr. Damian Kristof. I have to say, this was a killer of an episode. If you’re unfamiliar with Damian, he has a wealth of experience. He’s been working in the health industry for over 20 years. He’s a nutritionist, naturopath, and a chiropractor. He’s also a highly sought-after presenter and speaker in the wellness industry. I’ve seen him personally speak myself, and I thought he was amazing. His in-depth knowledge of the body, nervous system, food functions, and responses, it’s all in there and it’s all in today’s episode.

[00:01:00] We hit him up with all sorts of stuff, from chiropractic therapy, the importance of it, it’s had a bit of bad wrap lately in the press and stuff. We’re just interested in getting his take on it, and the whole spinal adjustment, stress. What else do we go into? We go into nutritional stuff, from what he calls we should be looking at nutritional care, not nutritional scare, which I love the whole concept as well. His recent trip to, forgive me if I can’t pronounce this correctly, Icaria, sorry, Damian, in Greece, where it’s a blue zone, where people are living the longest on Earth. He spent 10 days there, and what he learned from that experience, too.

[00:02:00] Sit back. This is going to be awesome conversation that we just had with him. I also want to give out a shout out to Alita T., who’s just left a review on our iTunes page. She says, “Just loving Guy’s podcasts, our guests’ interview style, wealth of knowledge, and passion for wellness. Oh, and the theme music.” That’s cool as well. That theme music took me ages to put together 4 years ago. Still going strong. “100 out of 10, Guy’s. Brilliant. Can’t think you enough.” I can’t think you enough either for a review like that. That’s really appreciated. As you always hear me say, these reviews help us get rank in iTunes and internationally, as well. Also by subscribing to your iTunes channel and 5 star rating. If you could just do one of them things if you remember, during our busy days, it just helps other people find these podcasts, too.

Anyway, let’s go over to Mr. Damian Kristof. Enjoy.

Hi, this is Guy Lawrence. I’m joined by Stuart Cook, as always. Hi, Stu.

Stu:

Hello mate.

Guy:

Welcome, mate. Our awesome guest today is Mr. Damian Kristof. Damian, welcome to the show.

Damian:

Hey, Stu. Great to be here. Thanks for having me.

Guy:

[00:03:00] No worries, mate. It’s been a long time coming. I’m very excited to have you on. I’ve been doing my homework the last couple of days. I thought, “Boy, this boy has got a lot of strings in his bow.” You are a man of many talents, mate, and I’m looking forward to unearthing them today over the next 45 minutes or an hour, something like that.

Damian:

There’s a bit to talk about, isn’t there? I saw your list of questions. I was like, “Wow, far out. There’s heaps there.” I’m happy with that. That’s great. I’m really looking forward to sharing with you guys. It has been a long time, but I’ve watched from afar what you guys have been up to, and I love it. Obviously, we’re traveling very similar paths, so this is potentially going to be great for everybody.

Guy:

Yeah. I’ve always been kicking off the show lately, mate, with, if you were stopped by a complete stranger on the street, and they asked you what you did for a living, what would you say?

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Damian:

[00:04:00] On a Facebook stalker. That’s what I do for a living. Apart from that, I spend my whole life helping people do a better job with their health. That’s my modus operandi. I’m motivated by seeing people do a better job with their health. Obviously, I run Forage, which is my music company. I’m a chiropractor. I’m one of the wellness guys, so I’m with the podcast network The Wellness Catch. I speak around Australia non-stop on food and nutrition, lifestyle, stress, and all of the above.

Guy:

Yeah, right. I actually found out last night, mate, and I had no idea about this, but you were actually a bit of a New Zealand TV celebrity at one stage, as well. Is that the case?

Damian:

[00:05:00] Those were the days. That’s when I had hair. That was amazing. That was good fun, actually. I filmed a TV show while I was over in New Zealand that highlighted healthy living, and what people would call today paleo were the principles that I shared with people back then. Before paleo word was trendy, I was just sharing with people, “This is how you do good health.” That got a brand name. Now it’s called paleo. The TV show was called Downsize Me. For three and a bit years, we helped over 50 people lose more than 3 tons of weight.

Guy:

Wow. That’s incredible. Just for our listeners as well, we always like to get a bit of background and a little bit of depth to whoever we bring on the show. Where are you from originally, and what led you into this whole world of health? You’re an extremely qualified guy, with all these different qualifications. There’s got to be a sheer passion there to go out and actually study and get all that, because it’s bloody hard work doing all that. Can you fill us in a bit?

Damian:

[00:06:00] Yeah. I grew up in very humble beginnings. I grew up in a really poor neighborhood in a suburb in Melbourne called Dandenong. Dandenong is a really low socioeconomic area. At that time, we were 33 Ks from the city. We didn’t know that many other suburbs were in between, because we just didn’t travel. We used to have bread delivered to our house in a garbage bag by the St. Vincent de Paul. They would bring it to us, and we’d scrummage. We’d go to the bottom of the bag and see whether or not we could find ourselves a cheese roll, or a cheese and bacon roll. Even if it was 2 or 3 days, we’d whack it into a microwave, and that would make it fresh. That was my nutritional starting. That’s where it began.

My mom tried to teach us as much as she possibly knew about food and nutrition. We were a single-parent family back in the early 80s, so it wasn’t that trendy to be single with kids back then. These days, most people do it. We grew up on the poverty line, basically. I got through school, decided to go and study to be an accountant, because I thought I could change the world being an accountant, and it took me 2.5 years to pass first-year accounting, and realized that it wasn’t maybe for me.
[00:07:00] My fruit intake consisted of strawberries and cream from Ellen’s Strawberry Milkshakes from Big M and strawberry doughnuts from Sara Lee, I think it was. I had an account at the local milk bar. The milk bar would get my Austudy, usually, and then I would have to try and scrimp and save to try and get through school.

I eventually got sick. Mom said to me, “Damian, you crook, you got to see a naturopath.” Went to see the naturopath, and he said, “Damian, you need a change of diet.” That took me by surprise, because I thought I was doing a pretty good job. He then said, “Take these herbs. That’ll make you better.” It did, and I thought, “This is pretty cool.” The only other herbs I’d used were different sorts of herbs that expanded consciousness.

[00:08:00] Having experienced the medicinal herbs, I thought that maybe I should go and study these. I decided to go study to be a naturopath. I passed. It took me 4 years to pass that, which was good. It was a 4 year course. It was a bonus. I then studied postgraduate nutrition to become a nutritionist. I do naturopathy nutrition, and found that really healthy people saw chiropractors, so I thought, “Well, I’m going to go and study to be a chiropractor.” I became a chiropractor, as well, so I did naturopathy, nutrition, and chiropractic in that order, and now talk about food nutrition, lifestyle, stress, and the nervous system all around the world.

Guy:

All of the above.

Stu:

That’s amazing.

Guy:

That is quite the journey. I’m intrigued about the chiropractic health. Tell us a little bit about why you thought that was worthy of your study. Also, for everybody that isn’t quite aware of what a chiropractor does, what do you do?

Damian:

[00:09:00] It’s a great question, Guy. We’ve been very poorly represented in the media recently, and that’s given people a massive misunderstanding of what we’re all about and what we actually do do. I was practicing. The first time I went out to practice as a naturopath, I went down to an area called the Latrobe Valley. I got that confused with the … There’s a beautiful valley in Victoria that’s known in the wine region, and I thought that that was the one.

I went to the Latrobe Valley thinking that was beautiful, and rocked up there, and everyone was sick, because they’ve got pollution dumping on them, because it’s cold, the brown coal burning and then the paper mills, and all kinds of stuff. I started working with really chronic diseases, not just cancer and multiple sclerosis but also lung afflictions and asthma and heart disease and all of this sort of stuff. I was really quite surprised. I found that the people that I was seeing that were the most engaged in their health, and the most motivated to stay healthy, the fittest people, the people who were the sharpest and made the best decisions around their health, all were referred from this chiropractor around the corner. I thought, “There’s got to be something to that.”

I went around to see this guy. His name was Gary Common. I said, “Gary, I don’t understand why so many people come from you that are so motivated to be healthy.”

[00:10:00] He said, “It’s simple. Chiropractors work with the nervous system. We use the spine to access the nervous system. When we adjust the spine, the nerves work better.”

I said, “Is that true?”

He said, “Absolutely.” He showed me some papers, some research that had come out of the U.S. at the time. We’re talking late 90s. I said that that’s pretty cool. I started to experience what chiropractic was all about. My mom’s cousin was a chiropractor, but I’d only been to him because I’d hurt my neck or hurt my back. There’s definitely a pain-based model with chiropractic in terms of its treatment. Gary took me through that pain-based model, and he explained to me why I was in pain. I had low back pain at the time. Then he said, “There’s more that you can experience from chiropractic that goes beyond just pain.”
[00:11:00] I started to notice that my body was feeling better. I noticed that I was thinking clearer. I noticed that my body just functioned better. I had more energy, and I slept better. We’d just had a newborn baby, and so I thought, “This is pretty cool.” If it works for all of these people, and all of these athletes around the world, like now we know Usain Bolt, we knew that Greg Norman, we knew that Tiger Woods, we knew that all of these elite athletes were using chiropractors to enhance their well-being and be extraordinary. Why wouldn’t it work for me? Why wouldn’t it be better for the population?

I decided I was going to go study it. I fell in love with it. I love chiropractic. I love what it does for people. I’m really disappointed with the way the media and the government portrays chiropractic in particular, the medical profession, because really it’s a fabulous technique, and it’s a fabulous model of treatment that assists people just to be well. It’s not dangerous. It’s very safe.

Guy:

[00:12:00] Yeah. Fascinating stuff. Most people aren’t even aware, I’m guessing, if their posture’s going to be aligned or not on a day to day, if they haven’t seen a chiropractor before. I’m guessing as well it compounds over time until the pain response gets too great, and then they’ll come and see a chiropractor. If somebody’s listening to this, and this has just popped into my head, and you wanted to screw up your posture over a few years, what would you tell them to do?

Damian:

Just keep drugs. Mask the symptoms. Get rid of the symptoms so that you don’t have any pain, then maintain poor posture for as long as you possibly can, until it’s too late. That’s how you’d stuff it up. But if you want to do something different, then try to avoid the drugs as much as you possibly can. Call up a couple of chiropractors and just ask them some questions.

Say, “Do you look after children?” If the answer’s yes, it’s highly likely they’re going to be a really good chiropractor, because unless you’re a good chiropractor, you’re not going to be looking after children. There are some amazing chiropractors out there that don’t look after children, but if you haven’t got one that you can be referred to, then generally if you know that chiropractors look after children, they’ve got to be good chiropractors, because kids are so fragile.

[00:13:00] Then, “Do you look after sports people?” If they look after sports people, if sports people are trusting them with their body, then it’s highly that they’re going to be reputable, as well. Then, go down there and give it a go. Don’t give it one or two goes. You need to be going for a few months to really start to feel the benefit. Give it a chance. We don’t do lots of massage. We don’t do lots of icing or heating. We don’t do joint repair.

Excuse me. Sorry. Very feel form there.

Guy:

You’re not the first to do that, mate. Don’t worry about it.

Damian:

It’s very poor form.

I would then suggest that you keep it going for a period of time. It’s little adjustments, because we’re not massaging, we’re not rubbing, we’re not adding creams generally all the time. Sometimes we do, but not all of the time. Most of the time, we involve ourselves with the correction of the alignment of the spine.

Guy:

[00:14:00] Got it. I was fascinated to bring up as well, mate, from speaking to you the other day, it can be a form of stress on the nervous system and a stress on the body if the posture’s out of alignment. You talk about stress being the emotional, chemical, and physical components as well. I’d love you to dive into that a little bit, because stress is such a huge topic as well. Somehow weave all that in together for us.

Damian:

I could definitely do that, Guy. I was asked about 5 years to go and do a talk on stress for the Chiropractors Association of Australia. I’m the kind of guy that says yes to everything. I just say yes, and then I work out how I’m going to do it afterwards. I can’t say no. I don’t know what it is. I said yes, and I’d never spoken on stress before in my life. I’d done a few seminars on it, I learned a bit about it, and then I said to Norm, who was the president at the time, “How long is the talk for?” He said 3 hours. I said, “You want me to talk on stress for 3 hours?” He said, “Yeah.” I said, “Fuck. I suppose I could do that. I could talk.”

[00:15:00] He said, “It’s going be to about 80 people. They’ll be in the room.” I said, “That’s great.” He said, “But we’re going to try on video broadcasting. We’re going to video it, and broadcast it out, and so it should probably reach about probably somewhere between 600 and 800 people.” I thought, “Wow, far out.” I said, “All right, yeah, I can do that, no problem.” I wasn’t afraid of cameras, having done television. I thought, “This should be easy.”

[00:16:00] Anyway, I put together this presentation. I researched stress, and went and spoke to lots of people about it, got heaps of studies, and put together a slide bank of about 180 slides. I literally had a slide per minute to get through. That’s death by PowerPoint. That wasn’t good, but in that lead up to stuff, I had a problem with my computer. On the day of the talk, my computer had crashed and wasn’t working. I hadn’t backed up my thing. I was going through massive stress events. Eventually, I got the computer to work literally a minute before the presentation started. I was so charged up and so pumped up, and my heart was beating so fast, that the time seemed to just fly. That 3 hours just got absorbed very rapidly, very quickly. I did this stress talk, but I suffered badly from that particular stress event for 3 or 4 weeks. I got a cold. I got run down, a sore throat. I was really tired.

I realized that what I’d experienced was exactly what I was talking about. I decided that I was going to go and teach people that there was more than just emotional stress that impacts the body, because there’s chemical stress, there’s the physical stress, and there’s the emotional stress. Usually when we talk about stress, people go, “It’s emotional. It’s financial. It’s relationship, workplace.” That’s really easy to digest and understand.

[00:17:00] The chemical stress is the stuff we might put on our bodies. It’s creams and lotions, potions, aftershaves, perfumes, hair shampoo. I don’t have to worry about hair shampoo, but for shampoo who still have hair. All of those things can be toxic load for everybody, plus the anti-stain stuff that goes on our coach. The anti-stain stuff that’s in our car. The chemicals we use to clean our with. All of that stuff is a chemical load that has the potential to challenge our body. That still mounts a stress response within our body that’s the same as the emotional stress response. We still have a fight or flight adrenal gland stress response to the chemical-based challenges in our body.

The same thing happens for physical trauma. Whether we go into pain or whether we have an injury that’s painless, that still gives us a stress response that’s physiological and chemical within our body. That still has a chemical compounding effect on our body that does drive disease long-term. You might have a localized inflammation of your little toe, but that continuous pain will give you feedback via the nervous system, via the spine of course, and that results in a stress response long term that becomes chronic stress.

Guy:

Then you [inaudible 00:17:46]. It’s interesting, as well, because people will still over-exercise, which is a form of stress on top of that, if they’re not getting the foundation. The food you eat is a form of stress. It can be.

Damian:

Very much so, yeah. I’ve seen people doing extreme things with food all the time. Even the absence of certain nutrients in your diet is stressful on the body. I interviewed some people that ran around Australia and did 365 marathons in a year. They did that on a raw vegan diet, but essentially fueling themselves with about 30 bananas per day. They resulted in some significant nutritional deficiencies. Yes, they did something that was superhuman. Yes, they were [inaudible 18:27] something years old, but seriously nutritionally deficient at the end of it. There’s certain things that you can allow your body to do, and there’s certain things that your body needs and requires in order to exist and thrive. They created so much stress within their body that could potentially become a disease process.

Stu:

[00:19:00] Very interesting. You’ve covered a lot of bases with stress as well with your emotional, chemical, and physical. All of these things need to be acknowledged and addressed. If I’m just a stress head right now, what are your maybe personally proven stress reduction strategies? What would you like me to consider?

Damian:

If you’re a stress head, that sounds like it’s more of an emotional stress thing.It’s really hard to remove stress from your lifestyle unless you go to somewhere like Grace, and you just hang out and do nothing, like I just did for the last 3 weeks or so. Unless you remove yourself from the environment, it’s very difficult to take stress out, because it’s always reminding you. You’ve got to find ways in which you can decrease the effect of the stress on your body. It’s not so much that we can reduce stress. We have to reduce the effect of stress, because stress is always going to be there.

[00:20:00] I would say, and what’s proven to work, not necessarily just what I would say works, though I do promote it, is exercise. Exercise, probably, and movement is probably the number 1 thing to downgrade the effect of stress on the body. If you’re not moving, you’re in effect increasing the effect of stress on your body, because you’re not moving enough. People who are living a sedentary life, sitting on a chair all day, working 10 to 12, 14, 15 hours a day in a corporate environment, who don’t get up and move around, don’t exercise in the middle of the day, or don’t exercise at the [full ends 20:16] of the day, they are causing some serious stress to be in their body. People speak about sitting as the new smoking. That could in fact be the case. We do know that works.

Chiropractic has also been shown to decrease the effect of stress on the body. The adjustment to the cervical spine, the neck, that can decrease the effect of stress on the body by regulation of what’s called the cerebellum here, and then control of the stress in the adrenal glands. That works via the amygdala.

[00:21:00] We also know that acupuncture’s very good, so massage, acupuncture, the ability to be mindful, some mindfulness. I know you guys have had Trevor Hendy on your podcast, and I dig Trevor Hendy’s Boot Camp for the Soul. I found through that 12 week period that I was probably the most mindful I’ve ever been. I’ve also done Mindful in May, and mindfulness also helped me just be mindful for 10 minutes at a time every single day. Doing Trevor’s thing and doing Mindful in May helped me maintain mindfulness, which also decreases the effect of stress on your body.

There’s a lot of proven strategies to decrease the effect. The key thing is just to implement 1 or 2 of them. 30 minutes of walking every single day. Let’s make it really easy to do. It decreases the effect of stress on your body by about 50%.

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Stu:

That’s good to note, because I’m guessing that if I’m in an environment where I’m very short on time, I’ve got huge pressures at work, and I listen to work and think, “Oh right. I’ve got to exercise. Okay, well I’m going to get up even earlier in the morning and attend the boot camp.” I’m stressed about that, as well. I guess you’ve just got to find what works for you. Like you said, 30 minutes of walking. Maybe I could get up 15 minutes earlier and walk a little bit, walk for [crosstalk 21:59].

Damian:

Yeah, or you do something at your lunch break, actually force yourself to have a lunch break. A lot of these execs don’t do that. They might have a lunch meeting, so they’re not mindful about their food. They’re having a couple of coffees for lunch instead of actually nourishing their bodies. That can be challenging as well.

Guy:

You can bring in incidental movement. You just park further away. You walk the stairs. It doesn’t have to be adding more stress to the day, per se, because you got to get up earlier to go to the boot camp or whatever, I’m sure would make a great difference. And it’s interesting-

Damian:

There’s this great app that can assist you. It’s Pokemon Go. You can get Pokemon Go and go and catch some Pokemons. [inaudible 22:36]. There’s so many super different fun, engaging ways in which you can exercise these days. There’s really not a lot of excuse for not doing much.

Guy:

[00:23:00] It’s interesting you mention mindfulness, because I think it’s the most non-glamorous word out there. I heard a fabulous saying the other day. “If you’re depressed, you’re living in the past. If you’re anxious, you’re living in the future. If you’re present, you’re present.” These things don’t affect your own perception. You have to be mindful to be present.

Damian:

Who said that? I remember that one. Was that Trev that said that?

Stu:

It was on the Random Show, guys. Tim Ferriss’s podcast [crosstalk 23:19].

Guy:

Yeah, I knew I heard it somewhere recently.

Damian:

I heard that recently. I like it, too.

Guy:

Yeah, it’s fantastic. Do you still activate prime practice mindfulness, Damian? What would that look like for you?

Damian:

[00:24:00] I won’t lie. I definitely fall out of mindfulness from time to time. Everybody, I think … If we’re living a human experience, I look around and I see a lot of robots. I see people who are being 100% with stuff for periods of time. They might be 100% with paleo, or 100% with crossfit, or 100% with vegan, or 100% with whatever it is, triathlon. I see they go so hard out until they burn out. That’s part of living, but that’s tough to be a human in that state, because you have to be so regimented.

I think that you can achieve a whole lot, and part of my human experience is that I’m okay to have some failures. I don’t mind if I muck up a few times. I don’t mind if I have a bad meal. I don’t mind if I miss a couple of days of exercise. The key thing for me is that in my human experience, I experience as much as I possibly can. Yeah, I do fall out of mindfulness, and a holiday is a great thing for me to bring me back into the present. You can get a bit caught up in all the things that have got to get done. You know that I do do a lot of things. As a result, every now and then, I do drop the ball on a few things. Trying to organize this podcast was a little bit challenging at times. In fact, I joked with a guy yesterday that our podcast today was going to be at 2:00 in the afternoon, not 10:00 in the morning, just because that wouldn’t have been a surprise.

[00:25:00] To bring yourself back into mindfulness is a practiced thing. You’ve got to be aware that you’ve fallen out of mindfulness, and it’s only if you get too busy, and you forget that you’re doing some things, or you drop a few balls, you go, “Hang on a second, I’m trying to get too fast.” Or, “Hang on a second, I’m trying to do too many things.” Or, “Hang on a second, I’ve fallen too far behind.” That’s when you’ve got to get mindful again.

Guy:

We’ve got you just come back from Greece. Stu’s just come back from Fiji. I’m expecting this to be a very mindful, present podcast with you two.

Damian:

I could go for that. I can speak very slow.

Guy:

It’s my turn next week when I go to Wim Hof, the Iceman retreat. That’ll be interesting.

You talk about nutrition. You’ve done nutrition. You’ve done naturopathy. I’m fascinated because there’s a lot of professionals out there that still can’t seem to settle on I guess an agreement on how we should be eating. This is crazy. It’s like politics.

Damian:

It’s ridiculous, yeah.

Guy:

It’s coming from all angles. If they can’t get it right, and people are just trying to live their jobs, do their lives and everything …

Damian:

Yeah. We are confused.

Guy:

Always, and the media, everyone … Anyways, lost this way. You said a fabulous line yesterday about, you talked about nutritional care, not nutritional scare. I thought I’d like you to really elaborate on that for us, please, on what you’ve discovered.

Damian:

[00:27:00] I don’t know about you boys, but I’ve discovered slight tinges of accents coming through across Skype here. What I’ve noticed is that for me, people that come into Australia, they’re quite shocked by how polarized we are. In Australia, we’re very black and white. We’re very right or wrong. We legislate for everything. I learned today that you can get a $400 fine if you’re caught crossing the road playing Pokemon. Are you serious? We’ve legislated now for Pokemon. What I’ve found is that in Australia we are so hardcore about doing everything 100%, good or bad, right or wrong, that everyone plays the tough game. That’s very, very confusing for people, because unless they want to play hard out, then they’re going to be considered to be wrong or not doing the right thing. People then tend to just throw their hands up in the air and just go, “It’s all too hard.”

[00:28:00] What I then find is that as a result of that, people try to play this scare campaign. There used to be this joke we used to have with chiropractic. There was some chiropractors that did this thing called chiro scare. Instead of offering chiro care, they were doing chiro scare. They’ll say, “That’s the worst spine I’ve ever seen. You’re going to require a lifetime worth of care. It’s going to cost you X amount of thousands of dollars for the rest of your life. If you don’t bring your family in, it’s highly likely they’ll end with wheelchairs, too.” Now, I’ve paraphrased a little bit and I’ve embellished a little bit, but that gave chiropractors a bad name. Not all chiropractors are like that. In fact, very few chiropractors are like that. In fact, fortunately, we do have legislation that that is now being legislated out of the country. You can’t do that now, which is great. That’s a good part of legislation.

What we now find is that people will say, “If you eat rice, you’re likely to die fast because it’s got lectins in there, or it’s got some kind of chemical in it. If you eat quinoa, you could get heart disease. Humans weren’t meant to eat buckwheat, so you could get colon cancer. These plants have been designed to have these chemicals in them that repel birds, and because birds have got a similar digestive system to humans, it’s likely that you could get toxic from eating grain.”

[00:29:00] We hear all these sorts of things, scaremongering about grain, and then we hear scaremongering about animal proteins. We hear the vegans bang on about poor little Daisy the cow that got slaughtered so that humans could exist, even though she cried when she was dying. We hear all these sorts of things that are perpetuating myths and perpetuating fear. I’m not being contentious here, but what that means is that people then start to think, “Oh my gosh, what I’m I supposed to do?” In reality, the best thing we’ve got to do, or the best thing that we could do is eat protein, fat, and carbohydrates with every single meal. That’s what our bodies requires, whether it be vegetable-based protein, whether it be animal-based protein.

Really, I prefer that we have raw, cold-pressed virgin oils. I really think that’s really important, whether it be coconut, and that shouldn’t be cooked, whether it be olive oil, and that should be only moderately heated if you’re going to heat it at all, or it’s macadamia oil. They’re my favorite oils. If you’re going to have other plant oils like linseed, then they’ve got to be raw, and they’ve go to be cold-pressed and kept in the right conditions, but don’t cook with oil.

[00:30:00] Then, I’ve learned that it’s better to eat heaps of plants. Have lots of vegetables. Have lots of fruits. If you choose to have grain, try to decrease the amount of gluten that you can possibly have, because the more gluten you eat, the harder it is for your body. I don’t go, “Everyone’s got to be 100% gluten-free,” but I do suggest that people should decrease the amount of gluten that they’re eating. I try to keep it nice and real, but have a really broad spectrum of fruits, vegetables, and salads. Have good quality protein, whether it be vegetable-based or animal-based, and make sure you’re including fat with every meal, and then you can’t go wrong.

If you go to the extreme about it, then you’re going to have an extreme reaction, and that’s where we’re at in Australia. We’re so extreme. Sugar’s now bad to the extent that people are scared to eat fruit. That’s ridiculous. That’s been perpetuated by a journalist who wrote a book about quitting sugar. We’ve got people that are banging on about the dangers, the pros of cooking with oils that you just shouldn’t be doing. We’ve just got to be really careful. I think we’ve just got to bring it back to a medium point.

Guy:

We’ve mentioned it before. Sometimes the stress of thinking about what you’re about to eat can affect you more than the food you’re about to eat.

Damian:

How stressful is [inaudible 00:31:05]. It’s like having orthorexia, where you have now a fear around eating food that’s not healthy. There’s people out there that now won’t eat food because it’s not up to their healthy standards. They’ll go to a café, and their friends think that they’re socially inadequate because they won’t share a meal with them. I would prefer that the café that I go to doesn’t use cottonseed oil to cook their food with. I would prefer that, but if I’m there with my friends, and I have some scrambled eggs and some avocado on the side and they’ve just happened to use cottonseed oil and olive oil blend to cook my scrambled eggs, I’m not going to send it back. That in itself is stressful on my body, and that’s probably going to be far worse for me than having one meal with cottonseed oil.

Guy:

Exactly. Yeah, I agree.

Stu:

[00:32:00] It is a tricky one. I read a quote once that said, “You can’t unlearn what you’ve learned.” That in itself can play quite a damaging part in the way that we perceive now what we should be doing to be healthy. We’re just scared of everything. What should we do?

Damian:

We should become a hater. That’s a really good way to move on. People started hating the food pyramid for some … They moved very quickly into the hate camp about the food pyramid, and so moved the extreme other end to the food pyramid. I hate the food pyramid. Don’t get me wrong. I think it was retarded. I think it was the worst thing that they ever put out, but the changes that Nutrition Australia have made are way better now than what they have been in the last 30 or 40 years.

[00:33:00] It’s still not the best thing. It’s just that in order to change a mindset about something, you’ve got to really repel it. When you’re in love with somebody, when you love someone so dearly, I find it fascinating that people can actually get to the end of that love relationship, and they end up in a divorce, and they don’t want to speak to each other ever again. They’ve had to go to the extreme end to get away from something. John Demartini talks about, for every action, there’s an equal and opposite reaction. The whole love game could in fact result in the hate game. I think if we just gradually move slowly away from it, implementing things that are healthier for our lifestyle, then we’re just going to do much better.

Stu:

Good point.

Guy:

It’s not just the food. There’s so many aspects.

Stu:

On that food issue, you mentioned as well that you were in Greece. Guy, I’m going to dive into this question about, is it Icaria?

Damian:

Yeah.

Stu:

Is that how you pronounce it? So Icaria. I read about it before. It’s a big collection of supposed centenarians. People live a really long life, and they do things a little different about that. I just wonder if you could tell us a little bit about why they went there, and then perhaps what you discovered when you spent some time there, too.

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Damian:

[00:34:00] Sure, boys. We’ve got a podcast. Marcus Pearce and myself have got a podcast called 100 Not Out. I play cricket. I’ve always loved cricket. I’ve always loved being 100 not out at the end of an innings. When we talk about an innings in Australia, it’s like, “Oh, you’ve lived a good innings.” They got to 90. Or, “You lived a good innings.” You got to 87. What a bad number to die on, right? That’s 13 away from 100. We’ve always said, “You’ve played a good innings.” I love the concept of 100 not out. Marcus and I both love cricket. We decided we’d call our podcast 100 Not Out, and we’d explore how people are aging well in society. We learned that in Victoria there’s a couple hundred people that live over 100 years old. We thought that’s pretty good. Victoria, Australia.

Then we read The Blue Zones and we realized that Dan Buettner had been exploring and researching many areas throughout the world, including the Himalayas, including China, and including different places, because obviously there’s the China study that we’ve all heard about. We think that the Incas lived for a long period of time. Not much was able to be validated in the research. Dan went on to then validate in the research that there was people that were living a long time in different areas.

[00:35:00] Icaria was one of those areas. We decided that because we wanted to learn more about it, we’d interview people from there. We called up some people. Thea Parakos, who was quoted in Dan’s book, we called her up and we interviewed her on our podcast. She told us stories about Icaria, and we became fascinated. We thought, “Well, let’s go there and take people.” We took 13 people with us to learn the secrets of longevity. We lived the lifestyle of the Icarians for 10 days. We were immersed in it. We ate their food. We went farming on their land. We drank their wine. We went to their churches. We swam in their ocean. Everything that they did, we did.

[00:36:00] It was funny, because I said one morning, “I’m going to get up and go for a walk tomorrow.” One night, I thought, “I think I’m going to go for a walk or a run tomorrow.” They said, “Why would you do that?” I said, “I try to stay fit.” They said, “Just go and work on the farm and you’ll stay fit.” It was a funny thing. They looked at us as if it was a really strange thing just to go and do some exercise. It was a really unusual thing, this foreign concept.

We just ate beautiful food, but there was a few things. We learned about 17 or 18 things. I won’t go through all of them. We learned that they embraced the community as their family. There was a very strong family and community connection. That was fabulous. We don’t have that very much here, particularly in the Western world but let alone in Australia. We get into our house at night. We lock the doors, pull the curtains down, and put the fire on, or we do down here in Victoria where it’s cold. You guys up there probably put the air conditioner on. We lock ourselves away.
[00:37:00] We don’t engage a whole lot. On school days, not many people actually entertain anymore. These guys, though, entertain most nights. They have people come over for dinner, or they’ll have people come over with wine. They go to bed very late, because they’re just socializing. We tend to jump on Facebook and that’s our human interaction. The human interaction side of things was fascinating. They all have a purpose.

They engage in their elderly in their purpose, so they continue to be purposeful, even though they get old. If you’re celebrating your 70th birthday, they think you’ve just reached middle age. When you’re over there, you don’t celebrate old age until you’re about 90 something. When your reach 100, it’s like, “Oh, good job. You’ve done a good job.” We identified that the elderly are still very much engaged in their community. The community feeling and the community spirit is very strong. The churches still come together. There’s a real sense of belonging and faith.
[00:38:00] They eat only what is grown on the land seasonally, so if they don’t have tomatoes because it’s winter, they don’t eat tomatoes. If they can’t get ahold of a zucchini, they don’t go and make zucchini quiche and freeze it. They just don’t do that. They only eat what’s fresh. If there’s a goat that’s available that needs to be slaughtered, then they’ll go and cut up the goat. The rest of the village will eat some of the goat as well. By and large, they’re only eating what’s available on the day.

Guy:

They don’t do consumerism very well, I was told, and they don’t import either. Is that correct?

Damian:

That’s true. They did have a supermarket open up on the island, and within 3 months, the supermarket closed down because they didn’t have anybody buying from it. They swap produce with their neighbors. They care for the neighbors. If somebody’s struggling, the whole community knows about it. If somebody is not coming out and engaging in parties or engaging in the community, attending functions, everybody knows about it. They’ll all rock up with food. They’ll all rock up and go, “Hey, are you okay?” All those campaigns where we get government campaigns to say, “Are you okay?” That’s actually part of the lifestyle of people that live in Icaria.

Guy:

How big’s the population there? Do you know?

Damian:

[00:39:00] They’ve got 7500 people that live on the island. I think it peaked at about 10,500. What they’re noticing at the moment is that a lot of the younger generation are wanting to earn a lot of money and be involved in consumerism like we are over here in the West. They’re leaving and they’re going to Dubai, or they’re leaving and going to Athens. They’re leaving and going to the UK, when the UK was part of the Euro zone. They’re going abroad to chase this dream.

Guy:

The dream, yeah.

Damian:

But they’re living the dream. They don’t know it.

Guy:

It makes me think of that book Siddharta. I don’t know if you read it. It’s just a guy. He goes off. He goes on search for the meaning of life, goes through everything, and then he comes back to where we started basically, and go, “wow.” That had it all at the start. Amazing.

Damian:

Yes, that whole [fisherman 39:39] story, isn’t it?

Guy:

Yeah. If you had to take 5 things from what they do, and try to implement them all in your life back here, what would they be?

Damian:

[00:40:00] Slowness is the key thing. That’s what I’ve really started to implement. Around our mealtimes, we used to just hoover everything. We just went oh, done. 5 minutes and it was finished. All right, wash the dishes. All right, homework done. All right, let’s prepare for tomorrow. It was a very mindless thing. That’s what we started to get to, because we just live busy lives. We’ve got a teenager about to go into the final years of school. My wife works in corporate. I’m running 3 different companies. We just found ourselves just getting very busy.

What I’ve started to do, and I found it a bit of a struggle today, because I have only been back for 10 days, but I was expecting that my diary was going to be full. You guys said, “Hey, are you going to have the time?” I was actually able to easily, honestly say, “I’ve got all the time in the world, boys. I can start a [inaudible 40:41].” That’s because I’m now not filling my book up. I’m not trying to go on. “Gosh, I’ve got an hour there. Let’s have a phone call with that person. Oh my gosh, I’ve got 2 hours there. I better go and do that.” I’m not filling my diary, and it’s a really nice feeling.

Guy:

[00:41:00] Do you think we can feel guilty if we’re not filling our time up, and not being productive, and actually just going, “Hey, can’t I just enjoy this moment of peace and quiet?”

Stu:

Just be very careful how you answer this, because Guy and myself are running the business. If you give the wrong answer, I’m going to be doing my own work.

Damian:

[00:42:00] That’s so funny. I feel guilty. I was driving to the office this morning. I left at 7:15 and I felt, “I like getting an adjustment.” I went past my practice and got Michael, who’s one of the chiropractors, to give me an adjustment. I just felt like having an adjustment. I got adjusted yesterday, but I was feeling like I wanted another one because I just wanted it. Then I decided that I was going head into the office. As I was driving, I called my mom and said, “What are you up to, mom?” She said, “Just doing a few little things.” I said, “I think I might go play golf today.” She said, “Really? Have you got a lot of work to do?” I said, “I might, but I think I’m still going to go play golf.” I decided that what I’m going to do is at lunch time, I’m going to have some lunch and then I’m going to go hit some balls. I might 90 balls just at the drive line. Then come back in and do the rest of the work for the rest of the day.

That’s unheard of. I would never have done that in the past. I’m now factoring golf in on a Friday so that I can … I don’t book podcasts anymore. I don’t book any meetings in the morning. I play golf on a Friday. On a Wednesday, I’m going to try and get out at lunch time and hit some golf balls most week. I’m trying really hard to not feel guilty about that. I’ve been self-employed since I was 18, 19 years old. I’m used to working long and ridiculous hours. I’ve got to really work hard on that. I’m being very mindful about not getting too busy, and not feeling guilty about it.

[00:43:00] You’re right, Guy, you can feel guilty about it. In Icaria, they’ve got a saying. “Just do it tomorrow.” They don’t worry about it. If you don’t get it done today, no one’s going to die if you don’t finish a table. No one’s going to die if you don’t get that thing in the mail on time, or if you don’t respond to your 30 unanswered emails overnight. If you don’t do that, no one’s going to die as a result of it. If you’re a surgeon, or you’re a GP and you got to prescribe drugs or you got someone’s life in your hands, then someone could die. That’s probably a little bit more serious, but you would hope that they’re managing their time differently. There’s this [sloppiness 43:16] of bringing it back, that lack of fear around completing things or not completing things. I’m bringing that back as well.

The food thing. I brought that back, so we now sit down at the table every single night. There was times where we started to not do that, but we serve up family meals now. Instead of the person who cooks, which was usually me, plating the meals up according to what I thought everybody should be eating, I now put the food that I’ve cooked onto individual plates on the table, and we all serve our own food. We’ve actually found as a result of that we’re eating about 30-40% less.

[00:44:00] We’ve also found that we’re engaging in more conversation. We’ve got a little rattle. We’ve got what’s called a gratitude rattle. I was given a gift by a beautiful lady Shawna, who came from New Zealand on our tour. Shawna bought this gratitude rattle. We rattle it, and then we give gratitude for the day. That’s something that we learned as a [bodily 44:17] practice while we were in Icaria as well, so we’re doing that.

The other thing is that I suppose I’m not as strict on myself with regards to my lifestyle. I’m incorporating exercise into my day, and I’m incorporating good food principles into my day, but I’m just not that anal about it anymore. I’m really going to try and relax on it, so that I don’t get stressed about the things that I do or don’t do. The reduction of stress appears to be key.

Stu:

[00:45:00] Amazing, because you can just let it go. It just made me think about the table, and putting all the food on in the middle, and then everyone helping themselves. I love that idea. I just wouldn’t do it with you, Stu, because you would literally all the food. That’s what would happen.

Damian:

I’ve just embraced the buffet principle, that’s all. I’m in tune with my genetics.

Stu:

Yeah. It doesn’t look like you’re going through too much of a bulking out phase there, Steve, but you could be … I’ve found I’m still able to do everything, and my physique is still similar to when I was eating twice as much food. I realized that I was just putting too many calories in. It’s not a bad thing, because genetically I can burn it, but I just didn’t really need it.

Guy:

Yeah, that’s fantastic, mate. I love the advice. We’re going to … I’ll jump in, Stu. I want to …

Stu:

You just jump in. I love the sound of your voice, Guy.

Guy:

I’m sorry, man.

Damian:

It’s like Marcus Pearce and me. I love it.

Stu:

Yeah, it rings in my ears throughout the night. I’m loving it.

Guy:

[00:46:00] There’s two serious talkers there, and I have no doubt Marcus will come on the show in the future, as well. Between the pair of you, my God, it’s absolutely phenomenal.

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Damian:

I know. We talk heaps.

Guy:

The Wellness Guys podcast. You’ve been doing that now how many years?

Damian:

5 years now. We just celebrated.

Guy:

5, yeah. That’s fantastic. I’m going to throw a separate question out. What has that taught you about yourself, interviewing so many inspirational people from across the world and bringing it in? We often say, since we started podcasting, it really is an amazing aspect that we feel privileged to be doing. I was just curious to think, what have you learned from that over the years just for yourself personally from podcasting?

Damian:

[00:47:00] You’re so right there, Guy. It is an absolute privilege to be able to do this. You get to be in touch with amazing people every single week. People are doing incredible things out there and spreading messages of health and well-being. Particularly in the podcast that you guys and we do, it’s all about health and well-being, and having an exceptional life. That’s been probably the most profound thing. I think I reached a point in my life and my career where I felt like I knew all that I needed to know, but in doing podcasting, I’ve learned so much more than what I could ever have imagined that I would have ever learned. All kinds of different theories around detoxification through to exercise through to different types of nutrition, mindfulness, even to specific nitty-gritty bits about gastrointestinal health or cardiovascular health or kidney health or liver health, all of the things that maybe I thought that I knew a lot about.

[00:48:00] I know feel like I know a whole lot more about, but I have a much greater appreciation for the incredible amount of knowledge that’s out there that I still don’t know, and that I still am craving access to. There’s just so much stuff out there. For every hour that I do of podcasting, I’m sure there’s at least another thousand hours on the same topic that I could probably get my hands on to even learn more and more and more. There’s been a massive explosion. Since podcasting has gone I suppose more mainstream …

Guy:

It has recently, yeah.

Damian:

[00:49:00] Even to the extent that all of the local … All the radio stations have got their own podcasts now, and even the presenters have got their own podcasts. They realize that it’s a very effective way to get a message out there. Since that’s happened, what I’ve found is that the knowledge base has exploded exponentially, far faster and far greater than when Wikipedia or Google got going. Podcasting, because it’s a conversation and it’s more natural, people get the opportunity to really tune in, like their presenters, have a relationship with their presenters. The amount of people that I meet that say to me, “It feels like I know you, because I’ve listed to you for the last 5 years.” That’s a really special thing that I don’t take for granted, and that I appreciate it so much. It’s something that I hadn’t achieved necessarily with television, and that was mainstream. Hadn’t achieved in radio, whether it be Triple M that I’m on, or whether it be Radio National when I was in New Zealand, hadn’t achieved that. Podcasting has allowed us to achieve that, because people building relationships. 260-odd episodes down the track with just The Wellness Guys and 150-odd episodes with 100 Not Out, and plus the countless other episodes that I’ve been on with regards to other people interviewing me, I’ve learned so much that I struggle now to work out what I’d write a book on. There’s just so much to talk about.

Guy:

I think as well with podcasting you can be yourself. If you’re working for a TV station, that I’m sure is governed to what you can and can’t say to a degree. With podcasting, there’s no rules. I know Tim Ferriss talks about that. Since he started podcasting, this huge weight’s come off him and he can just be himself and do the way he wants to do it without having to answer to other people.

Damian:

[00:50:00] Yeah, I think the only limitation has probably come out in the last probably 12 to 24 months. You might have noticed that Lawrence, Brett, and myself on The Wellness Guys, we’re all chiropractors. As a result of being chiropractors, all the way through, everywhere in the world, we’re entitled to use the name doctor. Dr. Damian Kristof. We can in Australia. However, because we were doing that, we used to call ourselves Dr. Damian Kristof, Dr. Brett Yule, Dr. Lawrence Tam. We started to get complaints about us calling ourselves with doctors. We were threatened by the authorities that we needed to stop falsely claiming that we were doctors. We were misleading the public because they thought that we were medical doctors, and we weren’t medical doctors.

[00:51:00] We dropped the name doctor. We go with just what we are, which is Damian, Brett, or Lawrence. We have very strict guidelines about what we can say, because we’re registered health practitioners or professionals. Many people ask us to cover various topics, which we just can’t cover because we will lose our registration as chiropractors. In Australia, we don’t have that freedom of speech thing that we used to think that we do have, particularly if you’re a healthcare practitioner. If you’re not registered in Australia, then you can go for gold, but we’ve got to be very careful.

Guy:

Wow.

Stu:

Fascinating. I actually think Guy was one of the people that put in a complaint, but I’m not entirely sure.

Damian:

That was probably because Lawrence says “exspecially.” I think that would be the reason why.

Stu:

Just wanted to … We’re coming to the close. We’ve chewed a lot of your time. Wanted to ask a couple little personal questions as well. The first being non-negotiable practices. What do you do every day?

Damian:

Every day.

Stu:

Every day, without fail.

Damian:

[00:52:00] It’s funny, because when you write that, and I looked at it. Somebody asked me the other day. I was interviewed on a podcast. I can’t quite recall which one it was, but they said to me, “What’s your routine? What routine do you have?” I actually don’t have a routine. I really … Even more so now since coming back from Icaria, I’m very fluid about it. I’ll go with the flow. If Amber requires something extra in the morning to help her get on with the day, I’m there for that. If Jackson requires something, then I’m there for that.

[00:53:00] I’ll exercise most days. I always drink truckloads of water. I’m dedicated for that. I guarantee you that I’ll have at least one coffee every single day. I really enjoy it. I’ll always be mindful about the quality of the food that I’m eating. I’ll always choose the best quality food that I’ve got the opportunity to eat. At breakfast time, if we’re making breakfast, which is 6 times out of the 7 days generally, it’ll always be outstanding, because we make it. It’s either going to be forage or it’s going to be eggs. That’s just what they do, unless I’m having a smoothie. I do a smoothie probably once or twice a fortnight. That’ll contain your protein powder, which I love.

Guy:

Good man.

Damian:

I put a food product in there called Yoga Food from Sean Kirk, which is really delicious. I work that in with your 180 Nutrition protein powders, and I love it. That’s really nice. Jackson has that after school, actually. Jackson, when he gets home from school, he has his 180 Nutrition protein, and he gets stuck into that. Food for us is paramount, but it’s not that at 9:00 I’ll do this, at 8:00 I’ll do this, at 7:00 I’ll do this, and at 5:30 I wake up every morning. I do wake up at 6:00 every morning, but sometimes I wake up at 5:30, sometimes I wake up at … There’s no real routine. I’m very fluid in the way which my day goes.

Guy:

[00:54:00] Yeah, fantastic. I was thinking non-negotiable as like, “How could I just fit in a bit of movement in today? What am I going to do around it?” The foods you eat, and within your control, and so forth. Yeah, awesome, man. We have a couple of questions or a question that we ask everyone on the show, Damian. Are you ready for this one?

Damian:

Yes. Ready for it.

Guy:

Drumroll. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

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Damian:

[00:55:00] John Demartini. I interviewed John Demartini. For me, I want to live a really long and amazing life. There’s so much more for me to do. I’m only 42 years old. I’m looking forward to when I’m 100 something years old, because then I’ll reflect on when I was 40 and go, “Geez, you said some stupid things back then.” I think what I’ve learned, and John Demartini, when we interviewed John on 100 Not Out, once said, “The least amount of variation in your life creates the greatest amount of longevity.” In other words, the more even your life is, the less amount of ebb and flow, the less extremes that you follow through your life, in other words the easier you make your life, the better it is.

[00:56:00] He says, and it’s this great quote, “The path of least resistance has made many a crooked river and a crooked man.” I love that. Whenever people take the path of least resistance, often they’re going to deviate a long way away from what their modus operandi is. If you’ve got a modus operandi and you just stick to it, and you don’t go extremes about stuff, you’re less likely to ebb and flow. He said, “If you don’t ebb and flow much, you will live a very long life.” I love that. I look at the calmness that I learned about in Icaria, where they just don’t get stressed. They don’t really worry about stuff. It’s not a really big deal for them if something doesn’t happen. I find that quite often we can find ourselves getting concerned or worried or anxious or depressed or frustrated about something that did or didn’t happen, or could have or should have happened. We should all over ourselves every single day. People should on us all the time. That creates anxiety and ebbs and flows, and I try to avoid that.

Guy:

Fantastic.

Stu:

Very good.

Guy:

Yeah, just about getting back to basics. Mate, what’s next for Damian? Got any plans for the future? I have no doubt you’re going back to Greece next year. That would be one of them, I’m guessing.

Damian:

Yeah, we are. We’ve just launched our new website for the 100 Not Out Icarian Longevity Tour. We’ll take 16 people next year. We realized that we could have taken 16. We took 13 this year. We’ll take 16 next year. I think at this point in time there’s 18 that have registered interest to actually go, so 2 people won’t be able to come with us. We’ll cap it at 16. That’s going to be really exciting.

[00:57:00] We’re going to do Sardinia as well. We’re going to go from Icaria and then we’re going to explore Sardinia, because in Sardinia, that’s also one of the blue zones. Then we’ll do Okinawa in another year. We just want to continue to explore that longevity thing.

You’ll see a lot more coming out from 100 Not Out. I think the things that we’re learning about longevity is going to bring people back into balance again. We really want to help people bring back balance into their life. That’s, for us, a really key way to maintain or to enhance longevity. You’ll see a lot more from Marcus and myself.

Brett and Lawrence and myself will continue to do the wellness couch. We’ll continue to run that. We’ve got the Wellness Summit coming up on the 10th of September this year, which I think …

Guy:

Melbourne.

Damian:

You guys are going to be at? Are you guys coming to that in Melbourne?

Guy:

We won’t be there.

Damian:

You won’t be there, okay. It’s an amazing event this year. We’ll have about 1000 people there again this year. We’ll continue to do that, the summits and the breakthroughs. It’ll be much the same from me, but you’ll just see me a little calmer I think.

Guy:

Fantastic, mate.

Damian:

Watch this face.

Guy:

So best place, if anyone wants to find out more, where would be the place to go? I’ve noticed you’ve got too many talents, mate. You’ve got several websites going on.

Damian:

Yeah, the best one to go to, if you want to find out what I’m up to, even my seminars where I’m speaking around the country or interstate or overseas. I’m in San Francisco in a couple weeks time. If you want to find out, go to damiankristof.com and you can see what I’m up to. You can click through to Forage there. You can click through to the Wellness Couch there, and find out more about what I’m up to.

Guy:

Brilliant, mate. Thank you so much for your time.

Stu:

Good stuff. We will load that up in the show notes, mate, and blast it out across our audiences, because there’s been so much great stuff coming out today, so I really appreciate it.

Damian:

Thanks, Guy. Thanks, guys. It’s been a real pleasure to share with you guys, and hopefully I didn’t talk too much, and hopefully your listeners got a lot from that.

Guy:

Mate, that was awesome. Thank you so much, Damian.


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