Marcus Pearce: The Exceptional Life Blueprint. The Secrets to Living Longer, Healthier and Happier! | 180 Nutrition

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Marcus Pearce: The Exceptional Life Blueprint. The Secrets to Living Longer, Healthier and Happier!

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Guy:  This week welcome to the show Marcus Pearce.  He wears two professional hats – one as the founder of the Exceptional Life Blueprint – an 8-step process to creating a magnificent life – and CEO of The Wellness Couch podcast network, Australia’s #1 podcast network with over 1.5 million annual downloads. He is involved with two podcasts on The Wellness Couch – one as host of Your Exceptional Life, and the second as co-host one of those podcasts, ‘100 Not Out’ . He also co-hosted Inside The Champion’s Mind alongside Laurence Tham for 80+ episodes.

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Questions we ask in this episode:

  • We often hear we should discover our life’s purpose and pursue that. Do you agree with this and what if we have no idea?
  • We live in a society where we often judge our success by our wealth and miss out on the very things we’ve discussed today. What’s your take on this?
  • All this can feel overwhelming, especially if we feel trapped, lonely or stuck in a rut. What 3 tips would you give someone to start creating change?
  • What is your Exceptional Life Blueprint?

Join Marcus At His Live Event

Marcus is running his two-day transformational event Exceptional Life Blueprint in Melbourne on June 3&4. Create magnificence in your life purpose & career, health, wealth, relationships, spirit and more.

A special 2 for 1 offer is currently running for a limited time. All the details are here.

Listeners of The Health Sessions podcast can also enter the draw to win a double pass to ELB Live. To enter, simply click here  and follow the prompts.

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Full Transcript

Guy

Hey, everyone. This is Guy Lawrence, of course, and welcome to another episode of The Health Sessions, where we connect with leading global health and wellness experts to share the best and the latest science and thinking, empowering all of us to turn our health and lives around.

[00:00:30] And we have a fantastic podcast episode for you today with the awesome Mr. Marcus Pearce. It’s been just a pleasure to get Marcus on our show, he’s a good friend, he’s a ball of energy, he’s probably the most positive person I know and every time I catch up with Marcus I feel like I’m on cloud nine, and it is just awesome to be able to share his message with you today.

[00:01:00] Now if you have no idea who Marcus is, he is the CEO of Australia’s number one health and lifestyle podcast, network, I should say, which is The Wellness Couch. They’re fantastic, and in 2014, he created the Exceptional Life Blueprint, a company dedicated to helping people rise from mediocre, mediocre, I should say, to magnificent in each area of his life, and not just one. And Marcus spreads his message through his online programs, podcasts, live events, and retreats, and one-on-one mentoring and more.

[00:01:30] Look, sit back, enjoy this episode. Like I said, Marcus is a top guy, and you’re going to get lots out of this today, and as always, guys, if you are enjoying the shows, please subscribe to the podcast, hit the five star, and leave us a review on iTunes. Just help us spread the word. Help us get these episodes out there so we can all empower our lives for the better. Anyway, let’s go over to Marcus Pearce. Enjoy.

Hey, this is Guy Lawrence. I’m joined by Stuart Cook. Good morning, Stu.

Stu

Good morning, Guy.

Guy

And I just got to say, your camera just froze with the best expression ever then. That was just perfect.

Stu

That wasn’t the camera that was frozen. That was me. I was just waiting for something. I was waiting for a pearl of wisdom to come out your mouth.

Guy

And there’ll be plenty today, so hold on, mate. Hold on.

Stu

[inaudible 00:02:03].

Guy

And our special guest today is Mr. Marcus Pearce. Marcus, welcome to the show.

Marcus

Guy, Stu, thanks for having me on. Well done on what you guys have been up to. Incredible what 180′s been able to do, both in the health and wellness space and in the podcast space, so well done, and yeah, a pleasure to be with you guys.

Guy

Great.

Stu

Thank you so much.

Guy

[00:02:30] Thank you. You’re too kind. You’re too kind, mate. Now, Marcus, even though I know you well personally, we’ll be exposing you to many new listeners today. So I love to ask everyone on the show, just to get the ball rolling, if a stranger stopped you on the street and asked you what you did for a living, what would you say?

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Marcus

[00:03:00] I have a different answer every day. I don’t know about you guys, but there’s always a different answer. Someone, it would be journalist by profession that used to be sports media that transitioned to health and wellness personal growth media. If someone had seen the online marketing, it would be I have an online program, and I run live events about helping people.

[00:03:30] Really, the purpose of my life is to help people rise from mediocre to magnificent in all areas of life, and not just one. But that is often too deep and meaningful for someone in the street, so to give that to someone in the street just knocks them out. So it’s actually just, yeah, journalist by profession that is a sports nut that wanted to do more than just work in sports, so I transitioned from sports media into health and wellness personal growth media, and then they’ll normally say, “What does that mean, and how do you do it?” and then I’ll tell them about The Wellness Couch and Exceptional Life Blueprint and the rest.

Guy

Brilliant.

Marcus

So there’s long short answer.

Stu

Wow. You know what? I will avoid you if I see you on the street in the future.

Marcus

Yeah. I’ll talk the leg off a chair to anyone with an ear. One ear or two ears, I don’t care. I love a chat, and yeah, it’s not fun, bailing me up on the street. Not fun at all.

Guy

That’s awesome, dude. So tell us then, Marcus, you, you know, a media, sports, journalist over to the other side, which could be the dark side, or the good side, depending on whether [crosstalk 00:04:08] from.

Marcus

Yes.

Guy

What happened? [crosstalk 00:04:13]

Marcus

[00:04:30] Well, actually, what happened was I fell in love. That’s really what happened. When I met my now wife Sarah, who’s a chiropractor by profession, I was working in TV at a show called The Footy Show, The AFL Footy Show. I was smoking, I was binge-drinking, I was just eating, what we would probably call the sad diet, but it was just every day, young Australian male diet. It would have been Vegemite toast for breakfast, and then minced slices for a morning tea, and then a chicken schnitzel for lunch, and then , you know, probably a can of Coke or a Red Bull, afternoon tea with a cigarette and then, you know, pasta and a couple of beers at night. That was kinda where I was at but there was nothing wrong with that in terms of socially or the work that I was in.

[00:05:30] But for my 21st birthday, I still remember this, my mum who … Anyway, my mum gave me Tony Robbins’ Get The Edge program for my 21st birthday, and at the time my mum did not have much money so it was a really big deal to receive that gift. And I met Sarah when I probably 23, I think 23 or 24, and so I was into personal growth but I would always skip over the health and wellness sections. So, if you did say Get The Edge, it’s a seven day program. I think from memory that the physical health section was on day four and I’d gloss over it because it just was nowhere, you know, where I was at right at that point.

[00:06:00] But then when I was working at The Footy Show, I realized very quickly I’d come home, it’d be three or four in the morning, I’d get into bed, I’d smell of cigarettes and it was too late or too early to have a shower depending on what time of the day I thought it was. I’d hop into bed, my new girlfriend by my side, stinking like cigarettes and beer and a day of work. And she was like, “This is disgusting,” and I was like you probably have a point. And I realized I’d been wanting to quit smoking for yonks. I probably attempted to quit 58 times and I realized pretty quickly if I was gonna marry this girl, I was madly in love, if I was gonna marry Sarah, have children with Sarah, I had to make a shift in my health and so, to cut a long story short, I realize that my three cigarette a day smoking habit was not just three cigarettes a day, because that was always my rationale, it’s only three a day.

[00:07:00] But I realized as a sports lover, if I use numbers, three a day was a thousand a year, was ten thousand a decade, and that’s what made me shift the smoking habit to obliterate it. And then I gradually shifted my habits and I realized that sports media, you know, working big hours, yes earning good money but I wasn’t going to see my wife and kids if I was going to ascend up that corporate ladder and I made a conscious choice, I didn’t know how I was gonna do it but I did make a choice back in 2007 that I would leave sports media. I still love sport but I would leave working in the sports media and transition over to health and wellness personal growth.

Guy

And that’s amazing mate, and how did you make the transition? Because I’ve no doubt there will be people listening to this today going, “I’m yearning for something else. I feel trapped. I’m in a corporate job. I’m doing something like this,” and when you look out of that it can just be overwhelming. You just go oh my God, that’s so far away, I’m gonna keep doing it for another year, do you know what I mean? And then, and then you never change.

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Marcus

My answer doesn’t have any great headlines. It’s not sexy in any stretch. The truth is it took about seven years. So, we came back from Europe. We’d been living overseas. We started our own chiropractic and wellness center. I thought I’d be a health coach in there, but I realized very quickly that a business needed me in other areas, so I did a lot of I suppose business management which was great, you know. I talk to you Guy a lot about just, you know, what it takes to run a business and I probably cut my teeth in the chiropractic world but that allowed me then to create a lot of contacts and networks in the health and wellness profession.

[00:08:30] And then it was in 2010 I had my real epiphany moment. We had our chiropractic center for two or three years. I read a book by John Robbins who was the heir to the throne of the Baskin-Robbins Ice Cream Corporation, and he wrote a book called Healthy at 100. On the second page of this book, there was a study done by the Yale School of Public Health and they asked 600 people over the course of 20 years, “As you age, you become less useful, agree or disagree? As you age you become more of a burden, agree or disagree? As you age you realize your best years are behind you, agree or disagree? As you age, you realize you’re over the hill, agree or disagree?” And what this study found was that the people that agreed with these statements, that as they age they become less useful, more of a burden, their best years are behind them, died on average seven and a half years earlier than people that had an empowered view of aging.

[00:09:00] And what blew my mind here was that they didn’t measure exercise or diet or relationship status or economic wealth or the air that they breathed or their genes. It was purely the power of a belief, and at the time we’d been running the business for two or three years. I realized every single person that came in with an excuse pretty much had an age related excuse. I’m too old to start chiropractic care, I’m too old to start exercising, I’m too old to change my diet, I’m too old to travel the world, I’m too old to trace my family history.

[00:09:30] There was so many age related excuses, and I realized then that I’d been barking up the wrong tree. I’d been a vegan for three or four years, hardcore vegan, thought that being a vegan was the secret to longevity or was the fountain of youth. Realized very quickly that I had been barking up the wrong tree and decided at that point that I was going to spread this message, you know. This was the big epiphany. It was like I’m gonna help people realize that the best of their life is in front of them and not behind them.

[00:10:30] I didn’t really know how I was gonna do it, but then that’s when I started the 100 Not Out Podcast with Damo. I thought that we would probably find that the vegans were the healthiest people, and Damo thought he would probably find that the carnivorous people were the healthiest people. But then we realized very quickly, like within about 6 episodes, that our dietary focus was very much … It was just factually incorrect, it was anecdotally incorrect, it became scientifically incorrect that nutrition was the number one ingredient to a great long life. And then my business took probably three or four years, the Exceptional Life Blueprint didn’t kick off till 2014. And so again, you can probably see that it was a very slow transition, which I think is important for people that are curious and they want to leave their job or change their profession. I think the decision can happen quickly, but the reality of it can take a long time.

Guy

Yes.

Stu

[00:11:00] Brilliant, brilliant. So you mention the key word there which was longevity. And I want to touch a little bit more on that because longevity is one of those words. Everybody wants longevity and we all hear stories about peoples nans who live to 95 and you know, 102, and we say well what’s their secret? Well it was sherry and a cigarette at the end of the day and right, I’m gonna start smoking and have a sherry. But in your research and study and obsession, passion, tell me more about longevity. What have you learnt and what is the blueprint do you think for us to get there?

Marcus

[00:11:30] Ah, great question Stu. I think that the key is most of us are going to experience longevity, just not the type of longevity that we want. So really we know that, you know, most people are living between 10 and 15 years of low-quality life to finish off their life. You know, dementia is on average an eight year process. Many people spend a good decade on five, 10, 13 medications.

[00:12:00] The highest incidence of suicide is in people are 85, and you can kinda get it, that their quality of life is so poor, they might be so lonely that they just don’t see a reason for being. A lot of people are worried about youth suicide, really the challenge more is in people that have longevity but they don’t have quality of life to go with that longevity. And that’s why I’m massive on the fact that we can’t just put all of our eggs into one basket, we can’t be vegan and think that that’s going to be the answer to our longevity, we can’t be paleo but hate our jobs, be in a terrible relationship, not move our body, have no money and have no real sense of self.

[00:12:30] The key I suppose is this blueprint for longevity, for me it’s a recipe with eight ingredients but the, like any recipe, the order in which the ingredients are applied is everything and I feel that a lot of us in society have been indoctrinated by either the mass media, or our family, or our teachers or society. We’ve got that order incredibly wrong, and so I suppose my passion is to help people realign that order of longevity, with a great long quality of life, not just a great quantity of life.

Stu

Brilliant, brilliant.

Guy

Yeah, got it. Go on Stu.

Stu

Well I was just gonna say, didn’t you go like, your retreats take you to blue zones around the world where you do get to study in depth how these people that are living extraordinarily long and happy lives.

Marcus

Yeah.

Stu

So what have you uncovered there in terms of, well, you know, are they Mediterranean diet aficionados or are they paleo or are they, you know, what are they doing that we’re not?

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Marcus

[00:14:00]
I think, I think … So we went to a Greek island called Ikaria in 2016, we’re going back there in 2018. We probably picked Ikaria because one, it’s a Greek island and you know, Melbourne, Melbourne in Australia has the second highest Greek population in all of the world. Like, Melbourne is the second most populace Greek city I think, it goes Athens and then it goes Melbourne, if you know what I mean, like. So I say that because I think as Australian, or people in Australian culture can associate with Greece.

[00:14:30] The other blue zones are Sardinia in Italy, which we’re also planning to go to. But Okinawa in Japan, Loma Linda in California which is a Seventh-Day Adventist, vegetarian diet culture, and then, Nicoya in Costa Rica. They all have different diets. This is the thing for me which is just paramount, and this is coming from, again, an ex-vegan, is that, you know, the Ikarians are largely Mediterranean, as are the Sardinians. They both drink wine. But then the Okinawans, they have fish but they don’t have much other meat. They have a lot of vegetables but not much fruit. They have rice which is very anti-paleo. But then you go over to say, Loma Linda in California, you know, they’re having soy protein, and they’re having a vegetarian diet which again, goes against some of the major trends that we see in the nutrition world. And then in Costa Rica, you know, corn is one of their staples.

[00:15:30] So then my whole view on it is we can’t just label things as right or wrong. The whole thing with going to Ikaria, for people, was to smash any preconceived ideas that they had about what it took to live a great and long life. So in Ikaria, they eat bread probably every day. The big thing in Ikaria that we wanted people to kind of get, and this was the biggest take away, was just the quality time and the social time. So, socializing and moving are the two big, I think, things that people have let go of in the fast paced world. So we’re now too busy to exercise, and too busy to socialize. Which is, which really in brutality is an excuse. It’s not the truth; it’s a lie. To say that we don’t have time to socialize is actually saying we just have got other priorities that we feel are more important and more consequential in our life than if we were to socialize.

[00:16:30] And so, the big thing for going Ikaria was we engaged with the community, with the elders, so that the people coming with us could realize how important socializing was. But also we’d go to festivals where we’d dance and we’d move, and we’d go on long walks, and during those long walks we’d have great deep and meaningful chat. So we’re moving our bodies, we’re socializing, we’re kinda having spiritual experiences and talking about, you know, deep and meaningful conversations. Other little things like ordering a coffee, but waiting for 20 minutes for that coffee to arrive, only because the waiter or waitress is engaging with you and wanting to learn about you and actually forget to go and put your order in for the coffee.

[00:17:00] Whereas, we live in say a capital city or a place where we expect a coffee in like three minutes. Seeing people unsettled by that was actually really important. The important process for them to go through, to go okay, what’s more important here? My coffee in three minutes or real human connection and a great conversation with a stranger. And is a stranger a friend you haven’t met yet, or is a stranger stranger-danger? These are all of the shifts in philosophy and again, you can tell why I’m saying an hour is not as easy at it sounds to have this podcast because we could talk about this forever but, these are the elements which seem small but I think make a massive difference in not just the quantity of our life, but in the quality of our life whilst we experience it.

Guy

[00:17:30] Do you think as well Marcus, that people are not even experiencing it now, people are coming into this world and I think about the younger generation, you know, that are growing up with Facebook, they’re growing up with social media, you know, and there’s a complete disconnect there. It’s a bit like, you know, I’ve met people that have never had sugar out of their diets, you know.

Marcus

Well, and they’re stressed out. Oh you mean they’ve never had sugar out of their diets?

Guy

Out of their diet no, they’ve never had it out of their diet. Never experienced it like, before, and it’s almost could be getting the same with this, you know, this social aspect that you’re talking about, because-

Marcus

[00:19:00] Well yeah. Yeah, you’re right about the younger generation in terms of what they’re being born into, but I think on say the social side of things … And again, I say this as someone who is [inaudible 00:18:04]. My mum is very social, again, I’m a journalist by profession, I’m very wordsmithy, very communicative, high value of communication. But, I think the challenge that a lot of the younger generation are having is now they’ve lost the art of socializing. But it’s not just the younger generation. It’s even people, I mean I’m 35, Guy you’re 21, Stu is 17, people have lost the art of communication, even in their adult years. Because it’s become socially acceptable not to socialize. So even manners, you know, hellos and thank yous and have a great day and just being nice to people has become almost a luxury item in society. And I don’t say that to be coy. I mean it’s brutally sad to a point, you know. Particularly when you go to the big cities, you know. getting niceties out of people is really … Go on a train and try and have a really special conversation with someone. Go on a train at about 5:30 and see if you can really engage. That’s harder then it’s ever been.

Stu

[00:20:00] I think that the impetus is always there, but we’re living in a society right now where we’re dialed into our devices and this insular world. That yeah we have; we’ve lost the art of virtually communicating because I was having a chat to my 11 year old daughter yesterday. And I was asking her about school and how you’re getting on, she said yeah look, some of the kids are nice, some of the kids aren’t that nice, you know. Nobody really talks and greets me and I said to her, I said why don’t you try being the first? And she said well what do you mean? And I said look, be the first. Be the first person to smile at somebody, all right. Be the first person to say hi because I bet that the more you do that, the more people will then want to respond and that’s how it works. Because people want to talk and they want to be friendly and they want to communicate but we just kind of shut down in this social media world where we’re insular now, and so she goes oh, I’m going try that.

And that’s kind of the way I [inaudible 00:20:13] too. If I see somebody on the street, I say hi, or like I’ll smile, and you do often find that that’s the catalyst then, to then steamroll the communication and you’re half way there.

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Marcus

[00:20:30] And that is, that is so awesome that you said that Stu. That is a great dad moment. That’s on the highlights reel for you and for all parents I reckon. Teaching our children to be leaders in their social lives because my corny one liner is that socializing is energizing, but socializing also requires leadership. It has to come from us. We can’t expect, unfortunately or fortunately, it doesn’t matter but these days we just cannot expect humanity to come to us with hellos and nice to meet yous and what you been up to today and let’s get to know each other and we could become friends. It just doesn’t, it doesn’t, we have to make the call.

[00:21:30] Even if it’s a friend we haven’t spoken to in four years, we can’t expect them to call us. We’re the one that has to make the call and whether it’s in the playground, or in the work place, or at a family function and you can’t remember your uncles name because you haven’t seen him for five years. We have to be the ones to go up and go, oh my gosh, I’m so sorry, I’ve had a mind blank, can you just fill me in with your name. And then, that 30 seconds of awkwardness can be replaced with 10, 15 minutes of quality conversation and potentially not just a highlight of your day but a a real turning point in the quality of communications. I’m so glad you said that Stu, because that is a very, it’s an exceptional mindset, not many people have it but it’s, I think in these days, more important than ever. In business, in family, in school, in community, wherever it is, it’s the leadership of socializing which is massive.

Stu

Brilliant. Well, look mate, my work is clearly done then so I’m going. I’m out of here.

Marcus

You’re done mate. You’re done. We can wrap this up now.

Guy

#bethechange That’s what I’m thinking.

Marcus

Exactly.

Stu

Absolutely.

Guy

I wanted to spin it back a little bit about Jeanne Calment. I’m assuming you interviewed her, Marcus. Is that correct?

Marcus

No. She died in 1997, Jeanne Calment.

Guy

Oh, okay.

Marcus

[00:23:00] Not fortunate enough. The oldest person we’ve interviewed is 107 now, still alive. Dexter Kruger, a farmer from Roma in Queensland. We interviewed Ruth Frith who was 104 when she passed, but I think she was 103 or 102 when we interviewed Ruth. Yeah, Jeanne Calment, this is the interesting thing, 122 years, 164 days, French woman. Smoked for 95 years. Drank port wine every night and ate a kilo of chocolate every week. My question as a curious journalist is why doesn’t the oldest human being on record ever to live a paleo, raw, vegan, gluten free, kombucha drinking, yogi who meditates every day and writes in a gratitude journal?

Stu

Are you sure she was alive? She wasn’t just perfectly preserved?

Marcus

[00:23:30] I think cryotherapy may have been enhanced yeah when she was going. I think it’s very humbling. I think it’s very humbling as a human being to see and whenever I share this at talks people are like, “Ah!” I’m always very clear to say don’t go out and buy a packet of B & H Extra Mild on the way home. Don’t go and get a bottle of wine. Don’t get a block of chocolate. The key is to live the life that you were born to live on your terms and to know within your heart what is on your terms, not in your head.

[00:24:30] I mean Jeanne Calment had a very challenging life. She lost her husband. She lost her only child. She went through major stress, but her mindset, and this is a common element, the spirit people with great long lives that actually have quality of life, I mean Jeanne Calment was riding her bike on her 100th birthday. She recorded a musical album in her 100s. I think she was 117 when she recorded her first album. She was fencing age 85. These people that live great, long lives they’re not just sitting in a chair. She was mentally cognizant up until almost the day she passed away. She was blind. This is the thing about quality of life, she was blind for a large chunk of those final years and was going deaf as well but still sharp as a tack up here. I know you’ve interviewed Dr. John Hart a couple of times on the podcast and I think what he says and what Professor Michael Woodward says is really important, that 42% of all dementia would be prevented if we moved regularly. We are not physically sufficiently active. Dementia is the worst thing that most people could say they could die of these dies.

[00:25:30] You look at people like Jeanne Calment, yes she smoked. Yes, she ate chocolate and drank wine, but she moved her body regularly. She lived her life on her own terms. Life purpose is ingredient number one, in my research, to an exceptional life, and movement is ingredient number two and then social life is ingredient number three. She had all of those things, which allowed a great long life. They don’t necessarily give you a great quality of life. That’s where food and relationships and growth and wealth can help along the way, but her spirit, her life purpose, her movement and her social life were all second to none. I think that’s why, this is my suggestion anyway, you can’t prove it, but I believe that’s why she lived the great long life that she did.

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Guy

[00:26:00] Marcus, what would you say … The word purpose came up a couple of times right? This was a question I was going to ask later on in the show but for a lot of people we often hear about we should be aligned to our purpose and go forth and do that, but then you’ve got … Everyone’s drinking simultaneously. I’m watching it.

Stu

Not everyone, Guy.

Guy

[inaudible 00:26:08] You need to be watching the video version to even understand what the hell’s going on. Anyway. Purpose. What happens if you can’t find your purpose or I’m sure, because you’re a coach and you have people going, “I don’t know what my purpose is. I can’t even get out of bed in the morning.”

Marcus

That is a wonderful question, and I’m so glad you asked it because in my … This is my answer but the answer does not come from me. It comes from probably Wayne Dyer and Bob Proctor and then probably Earl Nightingale. It comes from people down a generation. The one liner is, “It’s not so much what you do in your life it’s how you do it.” This was probably shown even more succinctly when we went to the Greek island of Ikaria. They don’t have a lot of money in Ikaria, but the way they live their life, how they live their life is what gives them their great quality of life. Whether you’re a farmer, a cleaner, you run a restaurant, you’re an accountant, you run a nutrition company, you’re a podcaster, it doesn’t matter what you do. It’s how you do it.

[00:27:30] Then people go, “Well, what do you mean how you do it?” I’m a big fan of the four cardinal traits, which I first learnt from Wayne Dyer but he first learnt them from Lao-Tzu in the Tao Te Ching and Lao-Tzu probably got them from someone else, but being honest, being kind, being respectful and being of service. If you can be kind, honest, respectful and of service it doesn’t really matter what you’re doing in your nine to five. If you can rock up to the office, let’s say you’re an accountant and you’re kind of sick of it, but if you can rock up and be kind to your fellow staff members, if you can be respectful of them and respect their differences and not nag them for having a Vegemite sandwich when you’re having a chicken salad because didn’t you know you should be having a grain free diet because our paleo ancestors were grain free and that leads [inaudible 00:27:57].

[00:28:30] If you can just engage and be kind with people, respect their differences, be of service and help people if they have a question and they need some help or if you see an old lady or an old man or a parent, a single parent with three kids crossing the road and having challenges, if you can just do that then my view is that your life will improve in its own fulfillment exponentially just by your being, not so much in your doing. So many people go, “What am I meant to do with my life?” I go, “Well, who are you meant to be? Who are you here to be?” I think our personality is probably more important than what we do because you hear the one liners all the time. People won’t remember so much what you do it’s how you made them feel. It’s the relationships that we cultivate. This is probably for me the biggest challenge I have with some of the greatest legacies every lived.

[00:29:30] There are people like Steve Jobs and Kerry Packer that did incredible things, but to be brutally honest I think they were deficient in the being side of their lives. In their relationships they were mediocre. I know that sounds brutal, and that’s not being gossipy. You learn enough about their lives to realize that they did incredible things and we are all so grateful for their legacy but because of the fact that they weren’t being, they weren’t putting as much time into their being not only were the consequences premature death but it also impacted not only themselves but other people around them. I think it’s really important on a life purpose level that we don’t just focus on the do. Because when you come home from night if you’ve been doing what you love all day but you come home from night and you’re a prick to your husband or your wife or your kids and you don’t answer your parents’ calls and you don’t chat to your mates, I don’t really care what you do. You’re just not being a cool human being. That’s a bigger point, in my view.

Guy

Good answer. Do you think from that will come more your purpose as well?

Marcus

[00:30:00] Yeah. The clues are in your being. When you’re being kind, respectful, honest or just whatever it is in your personality then the bigger ideas come. You have more awakenings. The courage comes to jump a bridge that you didn’t want to. My view is when you be in that certain way then the answers and the clues come in. But if you’re being down and despondent and angry and pessimistic and negative and cynical and all of those things which don’t bring the best out in you then it’s really harder to be inspired and courageous and make the big shifts in everything else.

[00:31:00] I’m a massive believer that the being is more important than the doing and the being allows the doing to come more organically rather than trying to force it. Because of social media people are trying to force their life purpose. “I want to do what 180 does. I want to start a superfood protein powder company and have this incredible impact on the world and all the rest of it.” You know what? They don’t really want to do it. They just see what you guys do and they think that will be cool. But you know Guy you and I have spoken about the emotional and the challenges on your personality and just the soul challenges you have in a business and they’re not on Facebook. They’re just not on the Channel 9 news. They’re not in the local paper. It’s really hard to find the challenges of the soul, the being side of life. Everyone sees the doing, but it’s the being that is number one. As you can tell, I do feel quite strongly about [crosstalk 00:31:17].

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Guy

I love it, Marcus.

 

Stu

Tell us what you really think, Marcus.

Marcus

Hold back. Hold back.

Guy

You mentioned Steve Jobs, right?

Marcus

Yeah.

Guy

Not that I wanted to Steve Jobs bash because I read his autobiography and I got so much from it to be honest with you.

Marcus

Absolutely. Me too.

Guy

But I’ve heard you mention about the Steve Jobs syndrome and you’ve talked about that. What lessons … Can you explain a little bit around that and what lessons have you learned from that for others to share?

Marcus

[00:32:00] Yeah, absolutely. Look, I call Steve Jobs syndrome, it could be anyone. It could be my grandfather syndrome. It is that we put too many eggs into one basket. In Steve Jobs’ case it was he sacrificed relationships in his life at the expense of Apple success. Essentially on a values level he was I reckon a lot like many men, or many male energies that were like, “My gift to the world and my self esteem is built up in what I do particularly between the hours of nine to five,” or if you’re a real workaholic it might be from 6:00 am until 10:00 pm at night.

[00:33:00] Just to give an example, not talking through Steve Jobs. I’ll talk through my dad. My mum and dad split up when I was 10. My dad was shocked. He did not know why. He said, “I go to work. What else do you want?” My mum’s behavior was really showing that, “Well, I want a relationship. I want you to have more of a relationship with your kids. I want more family time. I want more communication.” My dad grew up in the world where your work is what you do and your work is your self esteem so my dad learnt the hard way that well there are other areas of life that actually need to be watered. We have other plants in our garden not just our life purpose or our career.

[00:33:30] My dad lost his marriage. He had to drive out of the driveway, which I can’t even fathom what that would be like for the last time at the family home which he’d built with the beautiful pool and the beautiful garden and all of the things. He had to reverse out of that, leave the house to his now ex-wife, go and sleep on a single mattress in his mum’s home and what was it all for? What was it all for? I have a great relationship with my dad. He’s my best mate. I love him to bits. The poignancy of his lesson has been replicated millions of times over by people like Steve Jobs. He didn’t have a great relationship, his first daughter he almost did not want to acknowledge that he was her dad. That’s in the books so we’re not talking out of school here.

[00:35:00] Steve Jobs was adopted so he had major challenges and if you speak to enough people who were adopted it’s very challenging to engage with people when you’re adopted because the belief often is if I engage and get really close to you then you’re going to desert me and I don’t want to go through that pain again. If you speak to enough adopted people, it would probably be one of the hardest personal growth challenges I reckon to be adopted and to get healing with the relationship with your parents, with your adopted parents and with yourself. Steve Jobs never got to that point, and that affected a lot of his relationships in his adult life and because of that, you look at enough studies and it’s brutal and it’s disconcerting because of its brutality but the high percentage of people, we’re talking over 91% of people that have a strained and cold or a tolerant relationship at best with their mum or their dad will suffer from a high end medical crisis in their middle age. I don’t say that to be morbid. I say that more as a wake up call. If you don’t have a warm and friendly or a loving relationship with your mum or your dad I would highly recommend that you go through one of the hardest personal growth exercises and that is the art of forgiveness.

[00:36:00] The reason why it’s so hard is because you pretty much have to forgive every day. Because you can forgive someone for doing something to you and then they call you the next day and they’re a prick to you again and you have to forgive them all over again. Forgiveness is hard work, right? You look at the consequences and again I know we can’t scientifically prove it with a needle in your arm and a blood test but the amount, the correlation between poor relationships with our parents and the level of our health in our midlife it’s disastrously alarming. That’s why again I think this is very deep and meaningful for a podcast interview, but it is some of the most important work, particularly when we can say glean from the lessons that people like Steve Jobs, my dad and many other people listening who would have had the same experiences with their parents. They’re wonderful lessons to learn. The question is are we applying those lessons?

Guy

Yeah, spot on mate. Here’s a question that popped into my head. Steve Jobs, right? If he was more, I don’t know if this is the right term, a complete being as opposed to this one sided, dimension of success, do you think he would have achieved the same success?

Marcus

[00:37:00] This is a great question. This is one I’ve been pondering because I had the same question asked of me yesterday and it was the first time it had been asked of me and now this the second time [crosstalk 00:36:32] in two days. This is a very personal belief because it’s something that I, it’s almost what I rationalize with myself all the time. I have a one liner in my business and it is, “I have plenty of time to become a millionaire,” and I remind myself that because I could work, I work about probably 40 hours a week in my business. I spend so much time with my family. I could work 80 hours a week in my business, but the results would be disastrous for my family. Young kids, relationship with my wife would go to the bottom of the basement if I doubled my business, in terms of time spent.

[00:38:00] I believe, to answer your question, Apple still would have been the success it is today it may have just taken five or 10 years longer for it to occur. When you become a more rounded, in my view, exceptional, when you live a more exceptional life consciously things might slow down, results might slow down, but you’ve got more momentum in other areas of your life. You don’t have this great career but terribly relationship and awesome diet but no time to exercise and no time to socialize. You don’t have the volatility. You might have, I call it a slower pace of life, but a more fulfilling life. You make time for friends. You make time to socialize. You have a cup of tea with your wife at night. You say no to emails or no to nighttime meetings. You end up having those meetings the next day so it means things get done a day later.

[00:38:30] The spinoff is that the speed of life is slower and that’s hard because life is so quick. It’s a conscious choice to go you know what I’m going to finish work particularly for people who seem to have no kids, I’m going to finish work at 6 o’clock and I’m going to invite friends over for a dinner party at 7:30, which means I must leave work at 6:00. So I’m not going to spend an hour or two doing emails or low quality tasks at night. I’m going to go home. I’m going to cook dinner. It’s going to take me 45 minutes. I’m going to buy a bottle of wine on the way home to share with my loving friends, and I’m going to socialize from 7:30 until 10 o’clock that night. I’ll be in bed by 10:30, get up at 5:30, 6:00 in the morning to exercise, still start work at 8:00 or 9:00. It’s a slower way, but I do think it’s a more fulfilling way.

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Guy

Yeah, no, great. Great. I’m trying to figure out what Stu’s face was for [inaudible 00:38:51] all right I’ll just keep going.

Stu

Hold on. Hold on. How many questions do you want to ask before you give me a go? How many? Seriously?

Marcus

[inaudible 00:39:04], Guy. You’ve been [crosstalk 00:39:06].

Stu

What’s going on here? What’s going on?

Guy

As long as it’s a good question, mate, then fire away. Otherwise, you know …

Marcus

All of Stu’s questions have been awesome, Guy.

Stu

Thank you.

Marcus

I’m loving Stu’s questions.

Stu

[00:39:30] Well, I just wanted to say that you sound like you have created like a blueprint then for life because it sounds like yes you understand where we need to spend more time and perhaps where we need to dial back on the importance of relationships, social interaction and the other elements which are exercise and nutrition, things like that. I know that you run the Exceptional Life Blueprint and I wanted just for you to share what that is with our listeners, please.

Marcus

[00:40:30] Yeah, yeah, sure. You’re spot on. It’s very clear after boundless books, which you see behind me and podcasts interviews and living life I think is the best personal growth course in itself, just the consequences of living life are massive. I mentioned that there’s a blueprint or a recipe of eight ingredients, but it’s the order in which they go in. I mentioned the first three earlier. Life purpose, doing what you love and loving what you do, but being who you love and loving who you are and then movement being ingredient number two. Is movement a lifestyle chore is it a lifestyle choice? Mediocre behavior is a chore. They’re doing it because they have to or they should, not because they want to. Socializing, are you making time? As you mentioned earlier, Stuart, requires leadership. So, are you making time to socialize or do you have a mantra that you’re too busy?

[00:41:00] They’re the great ingredients for quantity of life but then we have what’s called quality of life accelerators. That’s where nutrition comes into it. When you eat well [inaudible 00:40:49] seasonal, local organic whole foods most of the time [inaudible 00:40:53] stressful but most of the time that adds a great quality to your life. You can work better. You’re a better parent. You’ve got more energy. You’re recovering from exercises better. Then love and relationships. When your love and relationships are better Christmas Days are awesome. Family birthdays are awesome. Coming home from work is awesome. Leaving home in the morning is awesome. When you’ve got enriching love and relationships life is just got way more quality to it.

[00:41:30] Then we go to growth. Ingredient number six is growth. We’re working up like a mountain here, like a triangle. The bases are the foundational principals, but when we learn what we love to learn, again, not what we should learn but when we apply what we learn, when we go from passive learning to active learning we truly get to improve the quality of our lives. Not just learning French on a podcast series but actually speaking French, going from passive learning to active learning, that improves the quality of our life.

[00:42:00] Then our wealth, spending less than we earn and investing the difference. Everything in our life, from an experience perspective costs money. You want to go travel the world, you want to go trace your family history, you want to take your wife on a 10 year wedding anniversary she’ll never forget, you want to buy your kids presents, go out to concerts, watch movies and all the rest of it, you’ve got to spend less than you earn and ideally invest the difference but most people in Australia, the average now … I’ve just been doing a bunch of talks for a real estate company and the numbers are 151% of our income is being spent. Australians spend $151 dollars for every $100 dollars earned. [crosstalk 00:42:21] mediocre behavior. The exception is to spend less than we earn and invest the difference.

[00:43:00] I feel very strongly about this because as you mentioned earlier, or we were talking about earlier just the lessons of life, when Sara and I got married in 2008 we also started our business and we returned from overseas. We very quickly racked up $55,000 in credit card debt. It happened so quickly, all these once in a lifetime things like getting married and starting a business and over capitalizing on the business and all the rest of it. Then one day we just realized holy moly how did we build a hole that big? Then we had to really apply, not just learn, but apply financial principals to get ourselves back into a positive cash position and so now still to this day we don’t have credit cards. I still run off cash. I can always look myself in the mirror and say I’m spending less than I earn and investing the difference. I think that’s a major thing. Credit is so easy these days. Cash is still king.

[00:44:00] There are the seven ingredients and then I put a big circle around that triangle and put spirit, soul and faith on that circle. Because if we don’t put our spirit, soul and faith into those seven ingredients of life it’s just intellectual knowledge. We do it because we should not because we truly feel it. You’re right. I feel very strongly about this because I see it in my own life. If I don’t pay attention to it. I’ve studied it in other people’s lives whether it’s Steve Jobs or Kerry Packer or the people that are doing it successfully. Again, the consequences are disastrous and that’s why for me it is my business, it is my message because it’s great accountability. I don’t want to suffer what my dad experienced. I don’t want to lose my family and my marriage at the sake of my career. Turning this whole blueprint into a message and and a business is the best accountability I could ask for.

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Guy

Of course.

Stu

Brilliant. That is absolutely brilliant and so applicable to probably everybody that’s listening to this podcast right now.

Guy

Totally.

Marcus

[00:44:30] Yeah, well if anyone wants to know more I’ve done a heap of videos series in the past that explains it in more detail. They can have an hour explained in a digital format, which we can just put in the show notes if you’re happy to.

Guy

Yeah, 100%, mate.

Marcus

We can just get an hour of ELB.

Stu

Yes, yeah. Yes, please. Absolutely.

Marcus

[00:45:00] My big thing after a podcast, and I know you guys have done hundreds and it gets a big thing as a listener, not sure what you guys think but when you listen to so many podcasts but the big thing is what do we apply after we listen. Do we just get out of the car and go to work and live the day or do we then go and apply what we listened to. I do think, I love podcasts. I do think they’re a great opportunity to learn, but the challenge of podcasts, it’s in the passive learning realm. I think all of us as podcasters want people to actively apply what they learn on the episodes that they listen to.

Guy

Yeah.

Stu

Definitely, yeah.

Guy

That’s a big difference.

Stu

Absolutely right.

Guy

I’ve actually slowed down the amount of books I’m reading because I just read and then throw it to one side and go that was great, but actually not apply anything within it.

Marcus

Yeah, and it’s easy to do isn’t it?

Guy

Oh, my gosh.

Marcus

It’s an easy trap to fall into.

Guy

Yeah, 100%. Just for the listeners, I love to do this. We’ve covered a broad range of stuff today no doubt. Everything you’re saying is making absolute sense. Now I want to take it back to that person listening to this. He’s sitting there and he is overwhelmed, doesn’t know where to start. What three tips could you give him right now to even give him a sniff that he’s creating change for the better? What would you say to that person?

Marcus

Okay, I’m a massive fan of a 24 hour action step. I generally say if you can do what’s called the exceptional eight. It’s one 24 hour step in each of those eight areas of life. They don’t have to be big. It could be giving your wife a kiss and a hug at the end of the day’s work or the start of the day because you realize in the business of life you just haven’t done a kiss and a hug. It’s amazing how many clients I speak to, I go, “Are you religiously giving each other a kiss and a hug when you come home from work?” And they’re like, “Uh, no.” It’s like all right, that’s all it is. That’s all you homework. It’s 30 seconds or five minutes and it might lead to five hours, you never know, but it’s just a kiss and a hug. That’s one step.

[00:47:00] It could be in life purpose. It might be you know what you might not love what you’re doing right now, but you might acknowledge that you’re not being the greatest person when you go to work. A lot of people that don’t love their work don’t bring the best version of themselves to work. My 24 hour action step on life purpose is well just go and be kind, go and be respectful. Be honest. Help people. I don’t care how much you don’t like your work. Be those four human traits in your personality and you will have a more fulfilling day.

[00:47:30] Movement could be five minutes of yoga, could be walking, depending on where you’re out. I’m all about progress, not perfection. That’s the big thing. You asked for three things. I’d probably recommend just eight small steps. If that’s too many just make it life purpose, movement and social life because they are the fundamentals of a great life. Engage with humanity. Move your body. Do what you love, love what you do or be who you love and love who you are.

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Guy

Brilliant.

Stu

Excellent. Excellent. [crosstalk 00:47:40]

Guy

Spot on. Yeah. Marcus, could I ask the next question, Stu? Is that cool?

Marcus

[crosstalk 00:47:48]

Stu

You’ve got a green light for that. Go for it.

Guy

Okay.

Stu

Here it comes. This is the question. Drum roll. Seriously, this is going to blow you away.

Guy

This questions, on one of the other guests, I can’t remember who it was, he basically said, “Huh, what do you mean? I don’t understand.” I thought, “Oh shit.” Maybe I need to rephrase it, but we’ll see how you go Marcus. Because we ask it on every show. You’ve probably answered it but what are your non negotiables to be the best version of yourself?

Marcus

Personally or for the listeners?

Guy

For you.

Marcus

For me. Like I said I used to get up at 4:00 in the morning, meditate, do gratitude, a bit of yoga, go for a jog, come home, make a green smoothie and then start my day. I did it for about three weeks and I was so tired and fed up with my morning routine that I realized very quickly that I didn’t have to do what everyone was telling me what to do. This was back in about 2008 or 9 I reckon. Now, if I exercise in the morning and Guy you know this, and Stu I’m not sure if you know this, if I don’t move in the morning for at least half an hour Guy Lawrence gets 50 bucks of my cold hard cash because I know … He hasn’t got a cent yet and ideally he will never get a cent. It’s a Monday to Friday commitment because I know if I move in the morning I’m in the best frame of mind to be a great dad, a great husband, a great entrepreneur, whatever it is. I’m just the best version of me.

[00:50:00] It doesn’t matter so much if I meditate or if I write in my gratitude journal or what type of juice I have or if I have sour kraut or not. That doesn’t matter so much. For me it is moving in the morning. That’s one thing and it’s very easy to measure, did I kick butt at it or not. So many people are like I was feeling a bit down so I got my essential oil and then I sniffed that and then I got this tincture and then I got a juice and a smoothie and I went and got a superfood latte and then I got this special herb and then I got this and I got that. I’m like jeez it’s really hard to win for you isn’t it? You’ve got to 75 things in order to feel good. If we can just have one thing it’s just such an easy game. So for me, to answer your question, the best start to my day is movement.

Stu

Just expand a little bit on the movement. When you say movement are just moving out of bed [inaudible 00:50:17] around the house? What are you doing?

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Marcus

For half an hour and then as I tick the box. This morning it was Tapout. Are you guys familiar with Tapout? It’s like a home workout, functional fitness. It was Muay Thai this morning.

Stu

Oh, really okay.

Marcus

[00:51:00] Did a bit of Muay Thai just in the backyard. I didn’t beat anyone up. Some mornings it’s a jog. It’s either flexibility, anaerobic or aerobic. Obviously three types of exercise and it’s a bit intuitive. It’s more like what do I feel. If I’m traveling I’ll do a lot of jogs because I get to see the great outdoors and I feel like it’s good for the heart and the body and good to get a sweat up if I’m in big cities and detoxify. Sometimes I feel, if I’m not feeling strong I’ll do some anaerobic, you know just more muscle work. My flexibility is my biggest weakness. Really I’d probably be wise to just to yoga every day for 90 days just to ramp that up. Particularly if I’m mentally drained I’ll do half an hour, 40 minutes of yoga. I don’t have too many rules because I see too many people who go to crossfit every day and then they end up with an injury. I’m like well maybe it might have been nice just to go for a jog.

Stu

Yeah.

Marcus

Or do some yoga. That’s just where I sit.

Stu

[00:52:00] I think it’s really important to take away as many barriers as you possibly can. For instance, I have a swim bag and I like to do lots of ocean swimming. In my swim bag I’ve got my goggles, I’ve got a towel, I’ve got my swimmers and I don’t have to look around the house to do, “Oh, where’s my towel. Oh, where’s my swimmers?” All that kind of stuff. I just go right I’m going swimming, pick up the bag, go. Just do it. Don’t create these barriers because especially in the morning if you’ve got even the tiniest little barrier you could just go forget it.

Marcus

[00:52:30] Stu, I know that you have kids as I do as well and this is what happens. If you don’t set it up as I did this morning, I walked out three doors. I walked out one door to find my shoes, one door to find my shorts and the other door to get out and exercise. The amount of time that takes with kids in the house they are little threats. They want to play with you. They want you to read them a story. They want you to make them a fruit bowl. If you don’t have that swimming bag or that exercise gear ready to go instead of it taking two minutes to get ready it takes you 10 and by that point they’ve got you and you have got to wrestle your way out.

Stu

Absolutely.

Marcus

I’m all for it, Stu. Make it easy. Easy and quick.

Stu

Perfect. That’s great. Look, I think we have covered so much and you are ultimately knowledgeable but I really respect from your coming from as well because you’re super passionate. For our listeners out there, where can we get more about you? Where can people go to find exactly what you’ve just told us?

Marcus

[00:53:30] Yeah, sure. A couple of things, I love in real life events. The Merrymaker Sisters as you both know, they’re very personable and we did a podcast interview recently and they put it up on social media as IRL interviews rock, in real life interviews. One way people can catch me is I am coming to Melbourne for an in real life, that is actually just a real life event in Melbourne at the Melbourne Convention Center June 3 and 4. That’s a two day event. Exceptional Life Blueprint Live, but online people can find me at marcuspearce.com.au or I’m at marcusdpearce, D for David on all the social medias, Insta, Facebook, Twitter and the like.

Stu

Brilliant.

Guy

Brilliant, Marcus.

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Stu

We will share those links across the universe.

Guy

Now Marcus-

Marcus

Thank you.

Guy

We were chatting before the show and to get people to take action you’re going to give away to one lucky listener a double pass to your live event in Melbourne. Is that correct?

Marcus

[00:54:30] I am. I am, Guy. I have great respect for your podcast. I’ve listened to so many of the interviews and really I must say as a fellow podcaster I have “stolen” a few of your guests. I’ve been so inspired [inaudible 00:54:30] by some of your guests that I have also interviewed them on 100 Not Out. Two of them in particular have been Mario Martinez and Dr. John Hart, but I truthfully say how inspired I am by the podcast. If I’m inspired by it I would like to think that a lot of your listeners are inspired by certain episodes and so ideally there’s a person that has been inspired by this episode that would love to come along to the event and I want to give everyone that opportunity. So there’s going to be a little competition.

[00:55:30] There will be a link in the show notes I think that will take people to how to enter. It’s only for listeners to the 180 podcast and again I love in real life events. It’s at the Melbourne Convention Exhibition Center so it’s a beautiful venue to get really deep and meaningful in helping people move from mediocre to magnificent in every area of life. We go through all eight ingredients. You create eight blueprints into your life so that you can truly again apply what we’ve been talking about today in your own life. Yeah, would love to have a couple of 180 fans there.

Guy

Yeah, brilliant.

Stu

Brilliant.

Guy

Thanks, Marcus. For the listeners listening to this all they need to do is come back to the web site 180nutrition.com.au and go to the search field, type in Marcus Pearce or Marcus. The first thing that’s going to come up is this podcast and then the link will be there on the show along with the transcription and everything else. It will be rocking. Marcus.

Marcus

Thanks guys.

Guy

No worries, and you are marcuspearce.com.au? Is that correct?

Marcus

That’s it. Yeah. All the stuff’s there and the easiest way to join the tribe so to speak and yeah it’s been awesome to chew the fat. We’ve probably gone over an hour I reckon. Surely we’ve gone over an hour on 180. [crosstalk 00:56:10]

Guy

We’re close.

Stu

I think we’re into our third hour. Easily.

Marcus

We could talk all day.

Stu

[00:56:30] Oh, yes. You bet. Absolutely right. It has been an absolute pleasure and we hope that we can connect with you at this level and a deeper level in the future as well because you’ve got a lot to offer. Really lovely.

Marcus

We’ve got to do an in real life just the three of us. I often see Guy in [Byron 00:56:35] because it’s a little bit closer but Stu we’ve got to get you down to cross the border and have an in real life trio.

Stu

I’m closer than Guy now. I’m living in Byron. I’m in Byron.

Marcus

Are you? I thought you were over the border.

Stu

No, I’m in Byron now.

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Marcus

There we go.

Stu

You’re literally just up the road aren’t you?

Marcus

Oh, there you go. If you can’t make it I’m just going to call Stu and say mate let’s catch up.

Stu

Absolutely. [crosstalk 00:57:01] Let’s do it. Absolutely. Yeah. I would love it. Guy, social secretary lock it in.

Marcus

Book it in.

Guy

Lock it in.

Stu

Brilliant, but yes we’re all local so got loads of ideas to share and would love to catch up for a mocha triple café tumeric latte or whatever it is.

Guy

Whatever it is in Byron [inaudible 00:57:23] at the moment.

Marcus

Don’t forget the beet root.

Stu

Yeah, beet root for about 15 bucks. I’d be up for that. Well, good.

Guy

Beautiful, gentlemen. Beautiful. Thank you so much and thank you, Marcus.

Marcus

Thank you.

Guy

Been a pleasure, dude, and you constantly inspire me every time I speak to you and you’ve just inspired a bunch of listeners today. That’s awesome. [crosstalk 00:57:46]

Marcus

Thanks guys. Thanks again for having me.

Guy

Good on you guys.

Stu

Thank you, buddy. Bye, bye.

Guy

Bye, bye.

 

 

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