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Healthy Snacks for Kids

healthy kids lunchbox ideas

Children have tons of energy and often it can be a struggle finding healthy snacks for kids. They spend much of it running around, playing, and doing other physical activities. The little ones seem to have far more fuel in their little tanks than full-grown adults do, but even the most active kids need to replenish that lost energy through snacking.

Not All Snacks Are Created Equal

Snacking refers to eating small amounts of food multiple times throughout the day for the purpose of staying satiated and energized. When most people think about snacks, foods like pretzels, crackers, chips, candy bars, granola bars, nuts, and fruit often come to mind. While really any food would serve the purpose of providing calories and energy, not all snacks are created equal. Many popular snack choices are rather unhealthy for a number of different reasons.

Healthy Snacks vs. Unhealthy Snacks

Choosing the right snack for your kid isn’t always the easiest thing to do. Most children already know what they like and don’t like, so getting them to try something new and unusual can be a bit of a challenge. On top of that, most junk foods taste great, so it can be hard to steer your young ones away from them. However, there are many healthy snacks for kids on the market, and here’s what you should look at before making any purchase

Quality of Calories (Not Quantity)

The number of calories in any snack product will tell you how much energy it provides. Unfortunately, not all calories are the same. In unhealthy snacks, such as potato chips and candy bars, most of the calories come from trans fats (vegetable oils) and processed carbohydrates. Instead, for them to be healthy snacks for kids, they should be made of  quality macronutrients of protein, complex carbs, and good fats.

Sugar Content

Unhealthy snacks often contain way too much sugar. Anything sweet, from cookies to fruit juices, are going to be full of it. What’s even worse is that the processed carbohydrate content is high too, which makes this double trouble and plays havoc on your kids blood sugar levels!

Protein Content

When it comes to kids’ health, protein plays a very important role. Proteins aid in muscle building and recovery, and getting plenty of them is essential for young children since they are rather active. If you want your children to grow up strong, have them snacking on foods high in protein.

Artificial Flavouring & Additives

Common junk foods are highly processed and contain all kinds of unhealthy chemicals. Preservatives, food colouring, artificial sweeteners and more do more harm than good for a growing child. As natural as possible is the way to go.

Nutritional Benefits

Ideal children’s snacks should be packed full of vitamins and minerals that promote growth and good health. Anything low in nutritional content should be overlooked.

If you’re looking for a healthy and delicious snack that your kid will love to gobble up, Monkey Bites by 180 Nutrition is an excellent pick. Made entirely from whole, natural ingredients, these little power bars are high in protein and good fats. Your kids will stay full and fit with Monkey Bites.

Click here for lots of quick and easy healthy recipes

The lowdown on protein supplements

The dietary supplement market has grown rapidly over the past 10 years, creating new products to help improve athletic performance and the boost the effectiveness of regular exercise.

Some of the most popular dietary supplements are protein supplements. There are thousands of different protein supplements on the market today. But knowing why, how much, when and which protein supplement to use is often overlooked. Below are some frequently asked questions when it comes to supplementing protein.

How is protein used during exercise?

While carbohydrates are the main energy source for the body, protein plays an important role in exercise. Protein is used to create, sustain and repair muscle cells. The metabolism of protein during exercise is affected by many factors, including age, gender, type of exercise, intensity and duration.

So how much protein do I need?

According to the American Dietetic Association, the daily protein recommendation for a healthy adult is 0.36 grams per pound of body weight. So, for example, a 150-pound adult would need about 54 grams of protein a day, which can be met by eating 6 ounces of chicken. For endurance athletes, the daily protein recommendation increases to 0.55-0.64 grams/pound because of the increased protein turnover during exercise. The protein recommendation is also increased for strength-training athletes (0.55-0.77 grams/pound). This additional protein is needed, along with adequate energy intake from carbohydrates, to sustain muscle stores and support muscle growth. These protein recommendations can be met through diet alone by consuming foods high in protein, such as lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, soy, milk and dairy products like yogurt and cheese.

When should I consider using a protein supplement?

While adequate protein intake can be achieved from whole foods, there are some benefits to using protein supplements. Protein supplements are a convenient way to ensure that you meet your protein needs. These are especially useful when you don’t have time to go home and prepare a meal after a workout or if you have trouble eating before an early morning trip to the gym.

Read the full article here.

For a natural supplement choose 180 Superfood.

Learn more about protein supplements

The dietary supplement market has grown rapidly over the past 10 years, creating new products to help improve athletic performance and the boost the effectiveness of regular exercise.

Some of the most popular dietary supplements are protein supplements. There are thousands of different protein supplements on the market today. But knowing why, how much, when and which protein supplement to use is often overlooked. Below are some frequently asked questions when it comes to supplementing protein.

How is protein used during exercise?

While carbohydrates are the main energy source for the body, protein plays an important role in exercise. Protein is used to create, sustain and repair muscle cells. The metabolism of protein during exercise is affected by many factors, including age, gender, type of exercise, intensity and duration.

So how much protein do I need?

According to the American Dietetic Association, the daily protein recommendation for a healthy adult is 0.36 grams per pound of body weight. So, for example, a 150-pound adult would need about 54 grams of protein a day, which can be met by eating 6 ounces of chicken. For endurance athletes, the daily protein recommendation increases to 0.55-0.64 grams/pound because of the increased protein turnover during exercise. The protein recommendation is also increased for strength-training athletes (0.55-0.77 grams/pound). This additional protein is needed, along with adequate energy intake from carbohydrates, to sustain muscle stores and support muscle growth. These protein recommendations can be met through diet alone by consuming foods high in protein, such as lean meats, fish, poultry, eggs, soy, milk and dairy products like yogurt and cheese.

When should I consider using a protein supplement?

While adequate protein intake can be achieved from whole foods, there are some benefits to using protein supplements. Protein supplements are a convenient way to ensure that you meet your protein needs. These are especially useful when you don’t have time to go home and prepare a meal after a workout or if you have trouble eating before an early morning trip to the gym.

How do I know which protein supplement to choose?

As far as deciding between whey, soy or individual amino acid supplements, it is important to get protein from a variety of sources. Also, a person using a single amino acid supplement may lack other essential amino acids, which can increase the risk for deficiency. In addition, certain individual amino acids, such as serine and proline, can have adverse effects on your health. Keep in mind that health claims posted on labels are not tested for validity, and under the Food and Drug Administration’s guidelines, it is the manufacturer that’s responsible for ensuring that a dietary supplement is safe before it is marketed.. According to the National Collegiate Athletic Association, protein supplements run the risk of being contaminated with substances that are banned by the association. A few of these substances include dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), human growth hormone (HGH), ephedrine and androstenedione. For a complete list of banned substances, visit www.ncaa.org/drugtesting.

Read the full article here.

For an alternative to chemically enhanced supplements try 180 Superfood.

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She embarked on a journey to look for ways and means to overcome the cancer herself naturally. More

The power of protein: How to turn yourself from zero to hero.

The Power of Protein

By Guy Lawrence

If somebody asked you why do we need protein? In my line of work, it seems the common stigma is to eat copious amounts after workouts, and if your surname is not “gym”, why worry. But believe it or not there’s a bit more to it than that.

Protein is an important component of every cell in the body. For example, your hair and nails are mostly made of protein. More