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How the Law of Attraction Works; The Scientific Explanation

The above video is 4:22 minutes long.

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Guy: Do you remember the movie The Secret? Ever since that movie came out people were talking about creating their reality and attracting riches beyond their wildest dreams! All a bit woo woo?

Well who better person to ask than a neuroscientist and psychologist who studies brain function and how it interacts with the world. In other words, he shares with us how our thoughts and subconscious beliefs play a big role in the quality of our experience of life! 

Dr Jeffrey Fannin

 

Our special guest today is Dr Jeffrey Fannin. He holds a Ph.D. in Psychology, an MBA and a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communications. He is the founder and executive director for the Center for Cognitive Enhancement and Thought Genius, LLC.

Dr. Fannin has extensive experience training the brain for optimal brain performance working with head trauma, stroke, chronic pain, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD), anxiety disorders, depression, trauma recovery. His research and experience also extends into high performance training, such as: personal achievement, performance brainmapping for sports, enhancing leadership skills through brainwave entrainment; improving brain function and to enhance mental and emotional dexterity and personal transformation.

Full Interview: Tapping into the Law of Attraction, Subconscious Beliefs & Maximising Brain Power

Audio Version:

In This Episode:

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  • Where to start if you struggle with meditation
  • How we create our daily reality with our thoughts
  • How to calm down anxiety and mind chatter
  • How to create energy coherence throughout the body to feel energised
  • What brain mapping over 3000 advanced meditators over the last 3 years has taught him
  • And much much more…

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Full Transcript

Hey, this is Guy Lawrence of 180 Nutrition and welcome to today’s health sessions. We have an awesome guest for you today and his name is Dr. Jeffrey Fannin. Now, he’s the founder and executive director for the Center of Cognitive Enhancement and Thought Genius. Now, he’s also an international authority and speaker in the field of neuroscience research. In a nutshell, he’s a brain expert and understands the brain, how it operates. He has extensive experience training the brain essentially for optimal brain performance and he’s been doing this for 17 years.

It’s a podcast you’re going to have to hang on to your hats to a little bit and if it was the first time we had a brain expert on. Now, in a nutshell, he’s been working with people from such as like head traumas, attention deficit disorders, ADD, ADHD, anxiety disorders, depression, trauma recovery. He’s then worked on the other end of the scale for high performance training such as personal achievement, personal performance, brain mapping for sports, enhancing leadership skills and all this is through brain entrainment.

I have to say this is a podcast that goes in every direction totally and this one I’m definitely going to listen to again just to fully understand everything that was spoken about today. All I say is just keep an open mind and just absorb it and see how you go. There’s a lot of practical advice in there too.

Just to give a bit of background, I first met Dr. Fannin. I actually had a brain mapping consultation with him. I was fortunate enough to be in a Dr. Joe Dispenza workshop now a few months ago and if you’re not familiar who Dr. Joe Dispenza is, we actually interviewed him on the podcast a few months ago as well. I highly recommend you check that out because it’s going to be quite a correlation into today’s episode. Essentially, we went to basically a meditation boot camp, if you like, for four and a half days and they brought a team of scientists [00:02:00] in and measured the activity of the brain and the coherence and what was going on within the body. That was Dr. Fannin’s role so I got to know him them and then I’d have consultations since. It’s just been blowing me away with the information I’ve learned from it and now I’m just trying to bring it back in and apply it to my daily life because that’s what we want to do. You want to try and be the best version of yourself and move forward with that.

If ever you’re wondering why we think negative thoughts, why we can be in a state of anxiety half the time, why do we do the things we do even though we don’t want to be doing them and we have bad habits and all sorts and all sorts and react to situations when we don’t necessarily want to, then Dr. Jeff Fannin is going to certainly explain a lot of that today.

Strap yourself in and enjoy. All right, let’s go ahead to Dr. Jeff Fannin.

Hi, this is Guy Lawrence. I’m joined with Stuart Cooke as always. Hi Stuart.

Stu:                  Hello mate.

Guy:                  And our fanstastic guest today is Dr. Jeffrey Fannin. Jeffrey, welcome to the show.

Jeff:                  Hi, it’s a pleasure to be here. Thank you so much for having me on.

Guy:                  It’s greatly appreciated. Now you’re actually our first brain specialist so I think you need to go easy on us a little bit today, okay?

Jeff:                  I’ll try and do that, yeah.

Guy:                  It does get me thinking, if you sat in an airplane next to a complete stranger and they asked you what you did for a living, how would you answer that?

Jeff:                  That happens to me more frequently than you think. We might be at a dinner party or on an airplane or something like that and it always gets around to what do you do. I used to answer that in a variety of ways and I’ve tried to simplify it. Now I explain to people I’m a neuroscientist. Then they get this deer in the headlights look, just like oh my good, this guy’s reading my brain. Then they want to know more about that and so we ensue with that conversation. What does [00:04:00] that mean exactly?

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We measure brainwave activity and we do that through brain mapping. We do an EEG, electroencephalogram, and then we will convert that into a quantitative EEG which means that we look at all these little heads and the colors on there tells us what’s going on in the brain. With these consults that I do everyday for people all around the world that have been to one of Dr. Joe Dispenza’s events and we do brain mapping on them and then I can do an interpretation. We use a GoToMeeting like what we’re doing on Skype here. I bring up their brain map and I can show them here’s what’s working for you, here’s what’s not working for you.

We even have a lot of signatures from people who are highly intuitive and I’ll show them that signature and ask them a question, do you think that you’re intuitive and the stories I get after that are just amazing. Well, yeah, it comes out in this way and that way and so I’ll show them the pattern of here’s the part that is what we call clairsentient or you know things about people but you don’t know how you know it. Then I’ll show them the signature on the other side of the brain of this is when people are able to interpret other people’s emotional states and you can do that quite readily. Then they’ll have a lot of stories about that.

Everybody has that ability. The question is do people tend to cultivate that and so with these meditators that we work with all around the world, the one thing that I’m finding that’s really fascinating to me is when we look at their brain map that there are these markers. There’s about 12 markers and we see a great deal in consistency. Over the last three years that we’ve measured them [00:06:00] at these events, probably close to 3,000 people, and talking with them we see the same kinds of signatures. Some are more defined than other but these people have the same markers and those markers really are the starting point where the magic begins to happen for a lot of these people.

We measure people who have actually inter-dimensional experiences. They have beings that visit them during these events. We have a lot of people who have been able to do healing. We’ve got a lot of stories in Dr. Joe’s book You Are the Placebo: Making Your Mind Matter and a bunch of brain cases in there where people have gotten rid of brain tumors, people who have lessened the effects of Parkinson’s disease or Hashimoto’s disease. Over the years, we hear a lot of that going on.

Guy:                  To pull it back a bit from that just to get a bit of background on what you do. I know you’ve been doing this a long time. I think it’s about 17 years.

Jeff:                  Yeah, over 17 years now.

Guy:                  We’re always interested to find out a little bit about the journey because I knew you used to be a pilot. Is that correct?

Jeff:                  That’s true. In fact my keen ambition for a long time was to be an astronaut. At one time I had an appointment to the US Air Force Academy. My cousin was a former governor and senator of Arizona where I live. I didn’t live in Arizona at that time but my grades were good enough to capture an appointment to the Air Force Academy. Then the Vietnam War is [00:08:00] pretty heavy during that time. I didn’t know if I really wanted to be in the military. I want to be an astronaut. That was pretty clear from the time I was about nine or ten years old. I wrote letters to the Mercury astronauts back then. They actually sent me letters back. Their secretaries probably signed them but I cherish them and had a little scrapbook with their pictures and followed all the Mercury stuff.

When it got to the point of having to decide whether I was going to go into the Air Force Academy I didn’t know if I really wanted to have a career in the military. I ended up … They had a banquet where we got a chance to talk to a lot of the cadets and whatnot there. They explained what goes on. I got some bad advice from my father. He was on a submarine during World War II and he wanted me to go in the navy. I didn’t really want to be in service at all but decided that I was going to opt out of going to the academy. Then I went the long way around and became a pilot and used to fly tours of Grand Canyon, Lake Tahoe, Monument Valley, fire attack to the forest service, doing all of that. Then got my self to the airlines from that job and was with US Air and flying the tours and stuff like that.

Then I came around to getting a career in the airlines and got on with US Air and stayed there for a few years. I was based in Los Angeles, at LAX, living in Phoenix. Some people commute an hour to work in their car. I would go to the airport, get up the cockpit and the jump seat and commute an hour to work that [00:10:00] way. When they started having layoffs in the early ‘90s and my seniority number was in the middle of the stack so the first layoff that dropped me to the bottom of the stack and that was no fun because then I’d have to almost everyday go over to LAX and sit in the pilot lounge for several days in case they needed another crew and then you’d have to go out. It was just skuzzy that way.

Then they had another layoff and that dropped me out of the system. At that point I knew it’d be at least two or three years with the way the airline industry was going there in the ‘90s before I could get back in. At that time I decided I really want to follow more of this brain activity. A lot of guys that I would fly with, they said, I love flying with you because it’s like going to a Tony Robbins seminar in the cockpit because we’d talk about all this stuff that I was so passionate about and learning. That’s when I went back and got my PhD in psychology and then decided to go down this track and learned about brain mapping. After I got my PhD and started working with people and doing counseling and I decided there’s a lot of these people, they don’t really want to get well so I’m going to work with high performance with authors, professional athletes, people like that.

That was good and they’re a real quirky bunch. They want to do it but they don’t want to anybody to know they’re doing it.

Guy:                  Like it’s a secret weapon or something.

Jeff:                  Yeah, exactly. That’s exactly the way. If I’ve got an edge I don’t want you to know that I got an edge which is really interesting point of view. Anyway, from there I learned more about brain mapping and that really flipped my switch because the more [00:12:00] I learned about it the more I found out that there was to know and went down that road and then eventually met up with Dr. Dispenza. When we first got together it’s really a funny story of how we did get together. That I was speaking at an event of another friend of mind, Greg Reid, that does Secret Knock. He would bring me in periodically, still does, to do what I call brain magic from the stage.

We would put somebody’s brain live up on a big screen and I would show how they change subconscious belief patterns instantly and be able to show a whole bunch of different things. We would always have fun with that. While I was doing one of these, afterwards Doug caught my attention. He said, hey, come here. I need to talk to you. We started talking about the brain and what it does. Somehow we got on a subject of people that I wanted to meet and I said I have two people on the top of my list. One is Gregg Braden and the other is Dr. Joe Dispenza. I really want to meet these guys. He says, well I do work with Dr. Joe. He says, maybe we could get together on a Skype call or something. That sounded a lot to me like have your people call my people and we’ll do lunch kind of thing but it actually happened.

We got together and talked and Joe invited me up to the Seattle area. He was having a training with a bunch of his instructors. We started doing brain maps on all of them and I’m sitting there telling him all about these things that I could see on the screen. Then later that night when we’re having dinner, he said I’d been looking for somebody like you for three years.

I left out a piece of the story that’s really quite amusing here. That at the time I was actually reading Dr. Joe’s book, the Breaking the Habit of Being [00:14:00] Yourself and just mesmerized by the book. I had given Doug some of the papers that we had published from work that we had done at West Point which is another amusing thing that here I would have gone to the Air Force Academy and done that. Then I end up roundabout getting involved with a research team of Arizona State University and going to West Point and teaching them how to use their brains.

Guy:                  Wow, that’s quite a journey.

Jeff:                  Anyway, back to the story. Dr. Joe went to Doug and he was reading some of these papers that we published. He says, I don’t care what you have to do. Get me an appointment with this guy. I was doing the same thing. I went to Doug and I said Doug, you got to get me an appointment with him. This book is fascinating. Here we were both trying to connect then we connected and I went up to Seattle. From there he was getting ready to do one of his advanced meditative events here in Arizona so we hooked up with that. We didn’t even know whether we could measure anything. We just thought, hey, let’s get it a try so we did and we thought we measured something. Then the next event we did another one, we found more and more and more and so this thing has evolved to the point where it’s not uncommon for us to have 650 people in the room and I was brain mapping about 350 of those people during a five-day event.

Stu:                  You’ve spoken about the brain mapping and all of the analysis and the reporting that you would undergo while you’re doing that. Is that neurofeedback? Is that how you’d term …

Jeff:                  No, that’s very different. The brain mapping, you’re just measuring what’s going on in the brain under different conditions. Neurofeedback is when we are training the brain. Let’s suppose that we [00:16:00] see a very high elevation at some point in the brain. Let’s say it’s in the back of the brain, we see a lot of beta. That’s usually a pattern that’s consistent with anxiety. If we want to reduce that anxiety, we will set up a protocol to train the brain. We put the electrodes on the head and now with a lot of stuff we do, we put the cap on the head like we’re doing the brain mapping but we’re doing the brain training where we can train 5700 variables all at once.

You have to understand one of the basic elements of the brain. We have our thinking cortex, or the thinking part of our brain, it processes information at 40 bits per second. When you look at the subcortex, the subcortical region of the brain, it can process 40 million bits per second.

Guy:                  When you say subcortex, is that like the subconsciousness?

Jeff:                  That’s right, yeah. You can think of it that way. It can process a lot of information that we are not aware of. When we’re training the brain, let’s imagine that my finger here is like a thermometer of information going up and down. We have all of that high beta in the back of the brain that is consistent with the anxiety. We would then put a threshold on that so that would be where that tops out kind of like right there. Then if we want the brain to produce more of whatever it is, every time it goes above the threshold we’ll give it a reward. Every time it stays, if we wanted to produce less, every time it stays below that, then we’ll give the reward. The question is, what is the reward?

We can give it sound, ding, ding, ding, ding, ding kind of thing. There’s a part of the brain called the nucleus accumbens and that’s how we learn everything. If this then this. That’s how we learned. Night follows day. Our brain [00:18:00] is very simplistic in that process. When the brain is producing these frequencies and we give it this reward, ding, ding, ding, ding, every time it stays below the threshold, the brain goes oh, okay, I’m going to do that and so it does it over and over and over and over and over again. That’s called operant conditioning.

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What that does in the brain is it causes new dendrites to form and new neural pathways developed. That’s what is rewiring the brain. It’s the same thing as when you create a habit. They say it takes 21 days to create a habit. It takes 21 days for those neural pathways to entropy or to stop working.

Stu:                  Nowadays, we’re living in a society where we got signals coming from everywhere. We’ve got internet and mobile phone and constant chatter in our brains and a lot of us becoming more anxious and you’ve probably heard the term monkey mind, this endlessly chattering of the mind, never shuts off. How can we use your strategies to tackle this?

Because I know that sleep, for instance, can be an issue for people where their brains just don’t shut off and also mood, things like that. What can you do?

Jeff:                  Let’s talk about the two separate issues there. Let’s talk about the sleep first because that affects a lot of people. I think first of all, we’re … Let me put the sleep aside and lay some groundwork here. I think what happens with a lot of people, like you say we live in a society now where a lot of information is coming at us. Everybody’s got all kinds of gadgets that they use. Our brain is now evolving to a new element.

What happens is with all of that information that’s coming to us, we haven’t learned how to manage that information and so that’s why my [00:20:00] book coming out is called Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Me Hostage. That’s also the name of my radio show that I have recently.

The point being is as our brains are evolving to a new element, getting into the sleep issue for sure here. When we see a lot of activity in the front part of the brain, in what we call delta. The brain is producing a lot of frequencies all the time. Delta, theta, alpha, beta, a lot of people have heard those but they are faster in frequency. For example, when delta is the dominant factor that’s when you’re asleep. Here you are trying to get to sleep and you have all these beta or delta activity in the front, that’s when people’s sleep is disrupted. Their brain, that monkey mind in the brain so there you have busy mind, tossing and turning, they can’t shut some of that stuff off.

With the brain training or the neurofeedback that we use, we train the neurons to stop doing that and move towards normal and then they sleep better or they get rid of restless legs syndrome, stuff like that.

Stu:                  Is that a lengthy process of training or is it something that you can do quite quickly?

Jeff:                  The answer to that is yes. It depends on what modality that …

Stu:                  All of the above.

Jeff:                  Yeah. It’s like is it nature or is it nurture and scientifically, we know the answer to that is yes. It is both nature and nurture. To answer specifically your question, how long does it take, if we’re using neurofeedback only, then we find that it’s usually a four to five month process so when we’re working with sleep issues or attention deficit disorder or anxiety depression.

Neurofeedback has been around basically since the ‘60s [00:22:00] in working with that and now we’re coming into an era of energy-medicine integration and so we’re working a lot with stuff like that. Some of the research that we have been doing recently and seeing elements of the brain change very quickly. Meditation is another thing that people are able to change these elements to their brain.

I’ll give you an example of some of the things that we have done just in the way of research. We would find people … I had a person that we did an experiment with. She had a lot of that beta in the back of the brain, a lot of anxiety and stuff like that. We did a 30-day process with this person. Had her meditate for roughly 30 minutes a day doing … She would average that. Some days were longer meditation, some days were shorter, but as an average 30 minutes every day for 30 days and then we asked her to use what’s called a focused intention. She would at some point in her meditate … Well let me back up a little bit.

There is a process that Dr. Joe teaches about pulling energy up through the energy centers of the body, what we would call the chakras if you will. You pull this energy with this breathing technique up through your body and hold the energy there and then the energy is able to do things in your body. She would do maybe five or six of those breathing techniques before she started her meditation. Then at some point in her meditation she would use the intention. She would visualize the red areas in the back of her brain and we had her, just give her brain very simple instructions and that’s the intention. I would prefer the red to be green.

I didn’t say, okay, [00:24:00] I want to nucleus accumbens to do this and go in through the chiasm. It didn’t have to do that. Very simple instruction, I prefer the red to be green. We brain mapped her in 30 days later, after she had done that done that for 30 days and guess what, the red is green and her anxiety was reduced.

Stu:                  Do you … Sorry, guy, just one quickie. Do you support your techniques with any nutritional or supplements during this process?

Jeff:                  Absolutely. Nutrition is so vital in all of this. We’re starting to see where people are enhancing their internal capabilities. Let me come back to that particular issue but I need to lay some more groundwork. Guy looks like he’s going to explode if we don’t let him ask the question in.

Guy:                  The only point I was going to raise was, there’s a lot of people who might be suffering anxiety or monkey mind, can’t switch off. Actually to get them to sit down for even five minutes to just be still is a massive task. Because then the [crosstalk 00:25:16]

Jeff:                  That’s what I’m going to share with you, some other information. We just finished doing a six month-long project with a group called access consciousness. If people aren’t familiar with that, go google that and you’ll see that for 20 plus years they’ve been out there working with people in order to do a process called the bars.

Now I have never heard of this process called the bars. Again, I was doing my thing at Greg Reid and the Secret Knock and when I showed up and they are big fans of this and so Greg’s wife, Allen said, “Oh, oh you’re here. We got to connect you up with Gary and Dane and you’ve got [00:26:00] to do this brain map on the bars.” It’s like, “Okay, all right, yeah, that’s good, fine. I’ll do it.”

I’d never heard of that and so we did the brain maps on a few people that were having their bars run and then I was supposed to speak about it at 8:00 the next morning. Well, that’s kind of a dangerous proposition. Measuring something you’ve never measured before and then you’re going to get up on stage in front of 300 people and you’re going to talk about it, you know, when I’ve never heard of this thing.

By the time I get back to the hotel after dinner and stuff it was kind of late and I was tired. I need my full brain faculties to do that. We processed it and by 3 in the morning, I’m looking at this stuff and my jaw is just dropping. I’m going, whoa, brains of my world don’t do this. There is something up here. That’s when I measured it in a whole bunch of different ways, then got up and talked about it. I was just so excited. There’s a YouTube of me out there talking about that, that’s really amazing. From that we decided to do this full out, full blown study at a very high level and we’ve just gotten that.

This bars process they use acupressure so they put their fingers on the head and the acupressure causes the energy in the brain to begin to move and flow. Everybody has areas that get blocked but the energy is not flowing and that’s what slows down some of these process. Now as we look at energy medicine and energy healing and energy psychology, that’s the kind of stuff that we’re dealing with, we found that people’s energy align a great deal and some of these elements that we would see in their brain maps would disappear like in an hour and a half. [00:28:00] Now explain that to me.

When you’re talking about energy, that’s what’s going on in the brain. There’s a graphic that I use in a lot of my lectures and it’s called the thalamic gate. At the top of the thalamus and the brain is a little almond shaped thing right in the center of the brain and it regulates a lot of the frequencies that go on in our brain, in our body. At the top of the thalamus there’s a set of what’s called reticular cells. These reticular cells, a function of that is to allow cells to bind to the top of the thalamus so that other cells can then, like axonal columnar cells can develop out of that through the cortex up through from a subcortex into the thinking part of the brain and it comes out right here, the top center of our head which is basically the crown chakra.

What tends to happen here is that we look at energy in the field, in the morphogenetic field, the collective unconscious, whatever you want to call it. We call that oscillation. That energy is vibrating. We live in a vibrational universe and we are vibrational beings. This energy then comes down through the crown chakra, through the thalamic gate, gets into the thalamus and then it begins to resonate. That’s the energy in the cells of our body so there’s communication that goes on. When people have energy that is not flowing or that is blocked, that’s where we find that disease occurs. All disease is nothing more than disregulated energy. When you line the energy and the brain knows how to regulate itself then you get that regulation flowing then these conditions that we see, why is it that people that come to these events … one guy had a brain tumor and he’d been to two events and then he went [00:30:00] to have his brain scanned again at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

When they came back in to give him the results, they said we can find no trace of the tumor and they said, come back in a couple more intervals and they still couldn’t find it. Why people get rid of the affects of Parkinson’s disease? We’ve seen brain elements change to help brain injury. I worked with professional athletes, football players in particular, that have brain injuries and we’re seeing some amazing changes on that. We’re moving into a new era where it’s going to change the way we understand healing in the world.

Stu:                  I just had a thought that occurred to me when you were speaking about the energy and how it moves from the top of the head all the way down to the different states of the body. Can we disrupt that energy flow with modern day devices? For instance …

Jeff:                  Yes, actually that does happen. I was doing some work with a physicist, Yury Kronn, and we were looking at cellphone emissions. The interesting thing about the cellphone industry is that you have usually three or four transmitters in the phone and they only have to report the lowest emission from any four of those so the other three could be very high.

He has developed a process where he can infuse subtle energy into like a sticker and we measure this subtle energy in a lot of different components. When you look at subtle energy and what is subtle energy, it is the energy that is really … that commands of the universe. When you see these pictures of a galaxy [00:32:00] and the galaxy is spinning, what makes the galaxy move? It’s subtle energy. The universe is made up of total subtle energy.

One little demonstration that I do all the time is, and it’s sitting on the corner of my desk, is a Tesla globe where you put your fingers on that and you get all these sparks that are going on in there. If I take a CFL light bulb and I hold it away from the globe where the energy is, that light bulb with light up. What causes that to light up? It is subtle energy and so we are part of that energy field. You and I are connected through quantum entanglement. We are part of each other and so it’s that. I’ve always wondered how when you watch a flock of birds or a school of fish and they’re all going along and now all of a sudden they change direction. How do they do that?

Is it the lead fish goes I’m turning left now and shoosh, off they go? No, it is the vibration in the field. Now let me add something to that and that is, how do we create our own reality because that’s all part of this? Again, in a lot of my lectures I talk about your thoughts. If you have a thought whether it’s a wanted thought or an unwanted thought, it doesn’t matter, the principle is the same. If you have a thought and you hold that thought for 17 seconds and that thought has a vibration energy to it, the law of attraction says that other energy that is like that will be attracted to it. Thoughts begin to come in. If I’m having a negative thought, an unwanted thought and I keep thinking about it, that’s … I’ll give you an illustration here in a second but if you hold that for 17 seconds, 17 more seconds, 17, you get to 68 [00:34:00] seconds. It now has amassed enough energy through a principle that’s called constructive interference that amassed enough energy that it can now affect particle matter. That is how we create our own reality.

Whatever your intention, whatever you’re putting out there, let’s say for example, I’m driving down the highway and I’m in this energy field of content and happiness and love and joy and feeling good and some knucklehead cuts me off. Now I’m vibrating angry energy and I’ve dropped down here. If I’m holding that energy for 68 seconds and I go back to the office and I’m telling the people here, this guy cut me off and I got so angry, he doesn’t even belong on the road.

Now I’ve held it for several hours and I go home and my wife’s fixing dinner and she says, could you go to the store and pick up a few items for me? It’s like, yeah, okay, it gives me more time to think about this knucklehead. I go to the store, get three items and I pick up the three items and go up to the register. Now I’ve been doing this, vibrating this for several hours and I get up to the cash register and there’s a guy in front of me in the express line that has 38 items. Coincidence, not hardly. That’s the energy that I have attracted to myself and I start attracting and we start living these patterns over and over again depending on what we think about if we just understand the principle, if I start changing my thought patterns I will change what happens to me.

You talk to people who maybe have an intention, they want more money and so they’re thinking consciously, I want more money, I want more money, I want more money. They’re putting that in the field and maybe they have a subconscious belief that says you don’t deserve more money. That’s what actually being broadcast in the field and their energy is not lined up so they’re not attracting [00:36:00] the things that they actually desire. Then there are those people who can line that up and it’s like wow, their life is magic, and it’s because they had learned how to manage this energy, not only physiologically in their body but through the thought processes and how to interact with the universal field. That makes sense to you?

Guy:                  It does. That’s like the scientific version of [crosstalk 00:36:24] … Go on, Stu.

Stu:                  If I was to sum that up, would it be we really should try and think happy thoughts?

Jeff:                  In a perfect world that would be great but that’s not what really happens. Seventy-five percent of our thoughts are negative. I don’t know if you knew that or not but …

Guy:                  We’ve got a question right here because I read somewhere that we have over 50,000 thoughts a day.

Jeff:                  Well, it’s actually higher than that. It’s more like 600,000. It’s more like what you have consciously aware of.

Guy:                  Wow, and then the majority are repetitive and negative.

Jeff:                  Yeah and they’re playing all the time and they’re in your subconscious so how do those get there? A belief is nothing more than a thought that you have over and over again. As you keep having those thoughts, that becomes ingrained or implanted in your subconscious and those are the things … If you want to know what’s on your subsconscious mind, look at your behavior. If it’s like, whoa, I have this behavior I don’t like. Well, that’s probably what your subconscious is about.

Now we have a device, I sent it to the other room, but it’s a headband that when you put it on, it has four electrodes, two in the front and then two behind your ears. All you have to do is think about something and it will let you know what your subconscious perception of that is and also what your emotions are, whether you have positive or [00:38:00] negative emotion.

We use this a lot with a program that we’re doing with Midwestern University Medical University and working with veterans that have PTSD and traumatic brain injury, also first responders and professional athletes that have injury. We can help them see what that is and you can literally use this to help train your brain.

Are you familiar with Mind Movies? Have you ever heard of Mind Movies?

Guy:                  I’ve heard of it.

Jeff:                  Natalie Ledwell is one of the founders of Mind Movies and it’s like vision boards on steroids. When we set somebody up with one of these, we also set them up with a subscription to the Mind Movies so you can have your own pictures, sayings, your own video and create a mind movie so that like when I meditate I will watch my mind movie before I go into meditation and then after I come out.

We’ve got some scientific brain maps of people one of the first times that we encountered this. We do like … some of the people we measured at Dr. Joe’s events, we’ll do pre and post so before the event begins and then we measure them again afterwards and look at the changes in their brain. We’re doing one of these pre and post readings with this gal and seeing the EEG going all over the place just like oh-oh, what’s wrong with that. It must be a bad electrode or what. I’m fiddling with stuff and then afterwards, I got her out in the outside of the room there and asked her, I said, “Tell me about what was happening there,” and she says, “Oh, I was just thinking about my mind movie.”

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She wasn’t actually watching it, she was thinking about it and it was so real to her she was having that [00:40:00] experience while we were mapping her brain. Now we have literally thousands of those where we have measured people going through that process and so there’s a great deal of power and energy in the brain that happens when you are focusing on this. If a person wants to begin to train their brain, that’s why we now have these tools.

Another one that we’re working on is this guy right here. It’s a 16-channel that will allow people to do brain mapping and brain training from their smartphone, their tablet, or their computer anywhere in the world.

Stu:                  If I wanted to do that at home and let’s just say I ordered a rogue kit off the internet, could I potentially do more harm than good?

Jeff:                  Yeah.

Stu:                  I’m sitting there and I’m putting this thing on and all of a sudden, I wet my pants, I don’t know why.

Jeff:                  Or you start quacking like a duck. That could be a little unnerving. Anything that you can train you can untrain and that’s what we call neuroplasticy in the brain. With the training that we teach the brain, I mean you can train yourself with bad habits. You know anybody that has bad habits? Yeah, we all know people. How did they get the bad habits? They train themselves. Can they train themselves out of a bad habit?

Yeah. I don’t know that you would get to the point of putting one of these on and wetting your pants. Here’s what happens when we’re working with that. We create what’s called a protocol or a set of instructions of what we want the brain to do. Maybe this is improving memory or improving your sleep or something like that. There’s a set of instructions that we create for the [00:42:00] brain.

When you put one of these devices on and then you select the brain training side of the application, it’s then going to go into a learning mode. You select learning mode. Imagine that there is cube in a tunnel and it’s suspended in space and what you want that cube to do is you want it to rotate counterclockwise. That’s the event that we want to have happen. You put it in learning mode and you’re thinking about rotate counterclockwise, rotate counterclockwise, and then you could set up neutral where it’s not doing anything.

Then you go into … It takes about eight seconds for your brain to learn that. It records the brain patterns of what you’re doing and then when you select the training mode and you start thinking about, I want that cube to rotate so you’re focusing on the cube and all of a sudden it will start to rotate counterclockwise and then you can control it, go neutral and it will stop.

Now I want it to rotate the other way or I want it to go in and out of the tunnel or I want it to disappear. You can create all of those conditions. We have the ability now to measure things in the brain and put them into a practical application. That’s where we are in the technological field of learning how to train our brains where you can begin to understand, what are some of the subconscious patterns that I’m feeding my brain? How can I train it to do higher and better things? How can I create a better reality for myself? How can I sleep better? How can … you know?

Going back to your question about nutrition, if you’re feeding your body really crappie stuff, guess what you’re going to get? A bunch of blockages and it’s going to cause the cells to react in a certain way. Eating healthy, having good [00:44:00] supplements, there is good food and then there is not so good food. You don’t want to live on a diet of, pardon the commercial here, you don’t want to live on a diet of Twinkies, probably not going to help you. You need a little more protein than just those carbs there or the sugar, so having that balanced nutrition is going to make a big difference.

Much of what we were thought about nutrition, when I was growing up the pyramid and the food groups and all of that, we didn’t know any better and so …

Stu:                  No, we didn’t. We like to use the power of our brain in this company at least and we turn that pyramid by just sheer thought upside down, so all the good stuff’s at the top and all the bad stuff’s at the bottom.

Just thinking about, if I’m at home right now, we’ve got our listeners out there and they just want to be, they want to be the best person of themselves or the best version of themselves should I say. I’ve listened to what you said about the subconscious mind and the ability that we can have to change these thoughts and try and become happier. What can I do at home? Almost like a hack or practical tools that I can apply perhaps everyday without having access to machinery, services and the like. Is there anything that I can do? You touched on meditation before.

Jeff:                  Meditation is one of the best things that you can do and there’s a lot of different ways to meditate out there. Some may get you a little further along. I think since we worked with thousands of advanced meditators over the last three years, we’re beginning to understand more about that. There’s a process called [00:46:00] mindfulness and there’s some book out there about mindfulness and if you can start to live present in the moment, that’s one of the best things that you can do. Also, be aware of your thoughts.

Am I getting caught up in these thought loops or can I break that pattern and say, no, I don’t want to be thinking about that because I know what the effect of that is going to have so I’m going to think more about … and let me give you some additional information here. We talked earlier about the negative thoughts and it’s important that people understand that the contrast in the world is very important, the yin and the yang kind of thing.

When we have negative thoughts, that’s really helping us because we understand what it is we don’t want which then allows us to put our emphasis or our focus on what we do want but you’ve got to have the contrast in order to do that. The contrast gives us focus and if people understand that basic principle then when you start having these thoughts about what you don’t want in your life then step back and say, okay, if that’s what I don’t want, then what is it I do want?  Oh, this is what I do want.

Then you start putting that energy into that and that’s what’s going to be begin to materialize in the world.

Stu:                  I understand.

Guy:                  The first thing is for you to be aware.

Jeff:                  You don’t need a gadget to do that.

Guy:                  Nearly every person I speak to though, Jeff, and if meditation comes up in the topic, nearly every person I speak to are pretty much having struggle with it.

Jeff:                  They don’t know how to meditate.

Guy:                  And to sit down for even, like you said, five minutes. What would your tip be for that? Even just to go this is what you need to do for five minutes a day to start, whatever.

Jeff:                  It’s like training a dog. You want the dog to sit and stay. In the very first part, you have to teach the dog to sit, right? Put your butt down on the [00:48:00] floor here and then it’s like stay and then you walk a little ways away. Sit, stay, and then after doing that again and again and again and again, the dog finally gets the idea of sit and stay.

Your brain is no different than that. You get into a meditation and you get all of this stuff going on and it’s like teaching your brain, sit, stay. No, we don’t do that. Quiet, quiet, and if you could only hold it for five seconds, great then the next time hold it for 10 seconds, 20 seconds, a minute and that’s how people build up their ability and at the same time trying to understand, okay, that business in my brain, all of that information that’s going on, I want that to be quiet.

Give your brain simple instructions, I would prefer when I’m in this meditation so you’re getting down and you’re actually cycling between theta and alpha. Theta is a very creative state, alpha is what we call sensorial rest where you are alert, that you are aware of what’s going on. We teach people how to cycle between theta and alpha. As they do that over and over and over again, new dendrites form, new pathways develop and that’s then what fires. People can do that at home if they’re willing to put in the work. Some people say I can’t do it. Yeah, you got decades of your brain running wild so wild dog, horse, wild brain, same thing.

Guy:                  Is there an optimum time to do it?

Jeff:                  I’m sorry?

Guy:                  Is there an optimum time to do it like get up first thing in the morning or it doesn’t matter what time if you want to just …

Jeff:                  It doesn’t matter. You do it multiple times a day, the morning … I prefer to do mine in the morning because I’m better. When I get 9, [00:50:00] 10:00 at night, I’m like a NiCad battery, I just kind of and I’d sleep. Yeah, I’m done. I usually will get up 3:34 in the morning and meditate for two hours. I never could do that before.

My brain, talking about all this beta in the back of the brain, my brain was like that. I didn’t even know what quiet was until I trained that out of my brain and now I have the ability to be quiet for long periods of time and be able to experience the value of connecting with the universe to find out what I want to find out.

Stu:                  You mentioned, you touched before on supplementation to help your brain state. Would you recommend any particular supplementation?

Jeff:                  There’s the two key factors that will help, are melatonin and serotonin. You take a little bit of melatonin at night, that can help and the one thing that I think messes people up when they’re dealing with that is they think more is better. It’s like, well, I’m not getting the effect I want. Three milligrams is about the max you want to take, less is better.

If you’re still awake after 30 minutes, you’re not getting drowsy, then take a little bit less, take half of that and that will help. Serotonin should be taken in the day, that’s what’s going to help you perform better as you go along. You want antioxidants, fish oil and stuff like that. Paying attention to what your body needs. Now some people really should go to their physician and have their blood drawn and look, see if they have any deficiency in zinc or some of the minerals because this is about bringing [00:52:00] your body and your nutrition into alignment so that that’s the way you live everyday and staying in balances.

This is all about staying in balance about not only the energy in your body but help the cells of your body by eating right and exercising. It doesn’t take a lot.

Stu:                  That’s right. If you’re talking about drawing blood as well and looking for deficiencies, it might be worthy to run a hormone panel on your blood as well because your hormones are going to participate.

Jeff:                  Absolutely. You can have all kinds of things that are out of balance and so if people recognize, the key here is to get both my body, my brain aligned with energy so that I can interact with the energy field around me. Everybody has the ability for intuition and that’s one of the things we see in the brain mapping, people who are highly intuitive because they do exactly that. They care about their nutrition, they care about the bodies, they do what they need to do to sleep well, to meditate, to stay in balance, they know when they’re out of balance, what to do to get back in balance, how to get grounded, there’s all of those kinds of things.

Stu:                  Got it. To you what strategies do you personally implement yourself to stay on top of brain health?

Jeff:                  I eat a lot of Twinkies and chocolate.

Stu:                  Perfect, we’ll stop there.

Jeff:                  No. Actually, I listen to my body and it will tell me what it is that I need and so a lot of it is just some education, basic education, of nutrition and things like that. Now I’m getting older, I just turned 65 [00:54:00] this year and so testosterone tends to be an element. I take a supplement that I get at Costco that deals with testosterone supplementation so I’m not dragging myself around all day feeling tired and lethargic. That really helps and it also has a lot of the B vitamins, B6, B12, be healthy. That’s in there as well.

Those kinds of things are really helpful and at different stages of life you might need different things or different conditions depending on how far out of balance you are. I’m not on any kind of medication. The only thing I take are these supplements and they work well for me. Other supplements people might need but it’s about being aware. If you’re not aware of those things, go to a naturopath and have them give you some instruction on it.

Stu:                  Excellent.

Guy:                  Do you ever get stressed these days, Jeff?

Jeff:                  Everybody gets stressed and it’s not a question of whether you’re going to get stressed or not. It’s a question of what do you do about it when it does happen. What happens in your brain is when you get into a stressful mode, your brain starts to produce more cortisol and then your memory, you think your memory is going and stuff like that and it’s all … Again, it’s when I experience stress it’s usually because I’m not grounded so I know the process I need to do and I can do it within a matter of three or four minutes, go through this process, get grounded and then I can get back.

Some people don’t believe in this but I do because I experience it quite a lot with people that I work with that there are what I call energy vampires out there. If my energy is [00:56:00] up here and the vibration of that energy is love, contentment, joy, bliss, all of that and that’s where I live in that range, there are people who come in that are down here in the worry, anger, fear stuff, and they like to draw off that energy of people who are in that higher energy level.

Guy:                  They complain all the time.

Jeff:                  Yeah. If you’re around that for a while you feel depleted or that person leaves you and you go, wow, they just sucked the life right out of me. Well, yeah, exactly. You have to know how to get one that’s beginning to happen to you, how to get grounded, how to pull the energy in, how to coalesce the energy, not only from outside of us in the field but pull it up through the body and you can do that in a matter of a few minutes and you’re right back on and you’re charged.

Stu:                  We’ve spoken a lot about nutrition and strategies to improve the mindset, what about exercise? Because I have heard that exercise can be perhaps one of the greatest strategies when tackling depression for instance.

Jeff:                  Yeah. When you do that … Talking specifically about depression, very often in the front of the brain we’ll see a lot of alpha and that’s what we call familial depression. When you’re walking and that causes the endorphins to kick in, and up here in the left front part of the brain, that’s where our pleasure centers are so, even just walking, exercising, walking in a treadmill, whatever it is, it will get endorphins to fire and you’ll start to feel good.

Stu:                  Right, so really, get moving.

Jeff:                  Yeah. Get moving, get out there, get … It affects, the muscles get stronger, you’re able to … That is [00:58:00] very, very important. Again, we’re talking about balance. You can over exercise. For me to go out and train like some of the professional athletes that we work with, that’s not a good idea for me. For them, that works great because their body is in a fine tuned mechanism and just the littlest changes in their exercise can have big consequences in their performance, in their ability.

For me, if I don’t do anything, well, I’m just asking for trouble because the energy is not going to get regulated. I’m not going to get that flow of energy in my body and so it’s knowing really what exercise is going to do good for you and what you’re going to be good at. What you enjoy. I love to play racquetball. I don’t do much of that anymore just because I don’t have time. It’s not because I don’t love it but I’m very busy in the things that we do but I can get out and walk and so I do that.

Stu:                  Perfect. Excellent.

Guy:                  Yeah. Wow. I guess the take home message for today’s podcast is listening to your inner self, isn’t it and creating balance within the body to have the harmony and not be influenced by external factors.

Stu:                  Start small as well. Many of us have, we got busy lives, we got busy minds as a consequence of that but if, like you said, we can just take perhaps just five minutes out of our day just to try and quiet down the monkey in the mind. Spend a little bit of time working ourselves.

Guy:                  I like the dog analogy, that’s great.

Jeff:                  Yea and a lot of it is get some education. Find out what this is. If you want to know how to do that, start with mindfulness. Watch some of the videos that are out there and get some books, there are plenty of them, to know how to be present in the moment when you’re washing dishes or when you’re [01:00:00] at work, whatever it is that you’re doing. That will make a huge difference in helping train your mind day after day.

It’s like you can’t go do one pushup and say, okay, well, I’m fit now, I don’t have to do that again. It’s got to become a lifestyle. It’s going to be how much do you want to be in balance or do you like letting your brain run you instead of you running your brain. You create the reality that you want, so if you don’t like your life, then my advice is look at what you’re doing and how you’re doing it because you’re the one that’s creating it.

The only person that’s responsible for the life that you don’t like is you.

Guy:                  Yeah. That would be hard to hear for a lot of people, I reckon.

Jeff:                  It is. It was hard for me to learn that concept and then say, whoa, I’m the one responsible for that. No way. Those people think that life is happening to them rather than them creating it. We are creators. We are here to create, to learn how to create and when you begin to understand all of the universal laws and components that go along with that that we’ve talked about in this podcast, then you start to change your reality and life starts to get better, things start showing up.

I love to play this game with the universe when I go out somewhere and if my energy is aligned, I want that parking space so just as I’m puling in, somebody is pulling out or the space closes the door is empty. You probably all had that kind of experience. What if you could do that with intention? What if you could do that all the time? What if you could create all of the things that you want to attract whether it’s the love of your life or you want to attract more things? This is about learning how to command the laws of the universe. If [01:02:00] that’s what you want to do then that’s why you’re here.

Guy:                  Fantastic. I love the parking spot too. I often try that and it does work.

Stu:                  You’ve got a motor bike, Guy. It’s easier for you. You might think that you’re commanding this parking spot but there are just more little spots that bikes can slip into.

Guy:                  Rock star parking.

Stu:                  You’re cheating yourself.

Guy:                  I’m fully aware of the time, Jeff. We’re coming to the end of the show but we ask a question with every guest and that is, what’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Jeff:                  The best piece of advice that I was ever given was I’ve had a mindset, a thought of the way that I was raised and the way a lot of people are raised is, you got to do more. I would take my boat down to the stream, not literally, this is figuratively, and put it in there and start paddling up stream, thinking harder and faster was the way to get where I wanted to go when really the best advice that I got was just stop paddling. Go with the flow.

I don’t have to turn my boat around. It will turn itself around and then I start going with the flow of the energy and that was the best advice that I ever received and really started me thinking about how I’m living my life.

Guy:                  Fantastic.

Stu:                  I like it, makes sense. Go with the flow.

Jeff:                  Go with the flow.

Guy:                  Yeah. Struggle is not there. If anyone is listening to this and they want to find out more about what you do, Jeff, where would be the best place to go?

Jeff:                  Website, we have a lot of information there, thoughtgenius.com. That’s a good place. I have a book coming out real soon. Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Hostage. You can go to the Voice America channel. I’m on the empowerment channel on voiceamerica.com and my radio show is the same name. There’s a bunch of this kind of information shows [01:04:00] out there, it’s free. All you have to do is log on there. You could get an app from the app store for Voice America and listen.

They have a bunch of channels on wellness and health and finance and I just happen to be on the empowerment channel with Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Me Hostage.

Guy:                  Fantastic. We’re linked to all the show notes anyway when we put this up in the new year. Awesome. Thank you so much for your time today. That was absolutely fascinating. I’m definitely going to relisten to this and take that information again.

Jeff:                  Thanks for having me on. You guys are awesome. I really appreciate it.

Stu:                  No problems. I really appreciate your time and hopefully, we’ll connect with you in the future.

Jeff:                  Absolutely. I’m happy to do this anytime with you guys, you’re fun.

Guy:                  Thanks, Jeff. Cheers.

Stu:                  Thank you very much.

Jeff:                  Bye-bye.

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Professor Grant Schofield: Why Counting Calories Does Not Work

The video above is 03:07 long. Use your time wisely ;)

Unless you’ve had your head under a rock recently, you probably know that Saturated Fat has been getting a lot of good press.

If you want to learn why eating saturated fat is good for you, the best foods for exercise and why The Heart Foundation is not the way forward, then this episode is for you.


Full Interview: Fat, Calories, Exercise & The Heart Foundation

This is the full interview with Professor Grant Schofield. Professor of Public Health (Auckland University of Technology) and director of the university’s Human Potential Centre (HPC) located at the Millennium Campus in Auckland, New Zealand.

downloaditunesIn this episode we talk about:-

  • Clearing up the confusion regarding saturated fat [003:05]
  • The South Pacific Islands study. Why one got sick & one remained healthy[006:25]
  • Why the Australian Heart Foundation have got it wrong [010:30]
  • What fats should we be really eat [016:17]
  • What we should really be eating for sport & exercise [023:10]
  • and much more…

Follow Grant Schofield on his: 

You can view all Health Session episodes here.

Recommended reading:

Buck Up: The Real Bloke’s Guide to Getting Healthy and Living Longer by Wayne Shelford & Grant Schofield

Did you enjoy the interview with Professor Grant Schofield? Do you eat saturated fat? Do you exercise with a fat adapted diet? Would love to hear your thoughts in the Facebook comments section below… Guy


Grant Schofield Transcripit

Welcome to the 180 Nutrition Health Sessions podcast. In each episode, we cut to the chase as we hang out with real people with real results.

Stuart Cooke: You’re not missing much, mate.

Grant Schofield: It’s kind of like a football with a bum underneath.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah. That describes my face quite well. OK.

Guy Lawrence: All right. Let’s start. I’m Guy Lawrence. I’m with Stuart Cooke, of course. And out special guest today is no other than Grant Schofield. Grant thanks for joining us, mate. We really appreciate it.

Grant Schofield: Likewise.

Guy Lawrence: I don’t know if you knew, but you’re actually our first New Zealander to come on the podcast show as well.

Grant Schofield: I’m honored.

Guy Lawrence: It’s a good thing. It’s a good thing.

Grant Schofield: You should be saying “kia ora,” Guy. Kia ora.

Guy Lawrence: I was looking at your blog just now, Grant, and on the About You section as well, and I figured there was a lot for me to remember there, so I thought the best person to explain a little bit about yourself would be you. If you could just tell the audience a little bit about yourself and why we’re excited to have you on the show.

Grant Schofield: Well, I find myself, now, talking about nutrition, but I never had any intention of getting into the field of nutrition, or, as a matter of fact, to keep your eye on what foods. But I originally trained, actually, as a psychologist. I’m pretty much XXleaguedXX well with psychologists, and that’s sort of a compilation of marginal intelligence and XXunknownXX that will generate XXunknownXX I read two-thirds of the XXunknownXX combination.

But I ended up in public health in the end, around obesity and especially exercise, and a lot of my recent work I’ve based it around; I’ve really spent my whole career around the conventional wisdom of it’s energy-in, energy-out. And if I can just get these moving more, it would be great.

Now, exercise and moving is good for people. But, as a solution to weight, it fundamentally misunderstands the metabolics of it all. And so, more recently, I think I’ve made some mistakes. I’m quoting Albert Einstein, if I understand this early Albert Einstein quote, which was: “Make things as simple as possible, but no simpler.” And I think in obesity, research and chronic disease research especially, the nutrition side, we are kind of simplified to the point of doing half. And we need to rethink that.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Fair enough. And it’s amazing, because, like, especially with saturated fat is now the hot topic in the news at the moment. The ABC Catalyst have just screened two shows about it, along with statin as well, and obviously there’s a lot of people out there that are a bit confused, a bit miffed, as well, with the whole message and what to do.

I mean, is that something you’ve always believed, like saturated fat isn’t healthful, or is that something you’ve been led…

Grant Schofield: Well, no, I looked at it in my early days as a professional triathlete, I would say I wasn’t an especially good professional triathlete. I went into being a professor and ended up better.

But part of what, for me, made me as fast as I could was I could never understand why I was; I was about 87 kilos, which for the professional athlete is hopeless. And I was training up to 30 hours a week and I just couldn’t keep my weight down. I was eating exactly; I had a dietician, I was eating exactly what I was told to, a sort of high-carbohydrate, mainly heart-healthy diet. Keep away from the fat, especially the saturated fat. I was telling people that myself.

And, I’d start to go, and I think most people in the nutrition that exists outside of the ivory towers now understands that it’s true, and there seems to be a parallel universe going on in nutrition where the public and most of the people in practice have figured it out, and the powers that be are in some sort of denial about what’s going on. So, saturated fat, I think, completely vilified.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, fair enough. Because the one thing I want to especially raise as well, because, you know, with yourself being a professor and your background of knowledge as well, it must be hard for even just the average person to think any differently, because that’s what we’ve been taught our whole lives, you know.

And the message out there is so confusing at the moment. And, you know, it’s the same for myself. Until I lived and breathed it and actually started investigating deeper and deeper, then you don’t; you know, what would be your message to someone that is sitting on the fence about this.

Grant Schofield: That you just, I think if you’re sitting on the fence and you’re trying to decide about this same thing, there’s plenty of resources out there and this “n equals 1.” We hear a lot about this n equals 1. It’s self-experimentation. But that’s exactly how I got into this. That’s how I’ve managed to coax everyone I know into this way of doing things is just try it for a few weeks and see what happens. And if it doesn’t turn out, well, that’s short-term. You’re not gonna keel over. You can re-evaluate after that and when people do that, of course they see that the science was wrong. It had to be. Because you do the opposite of what everyone recommends and the exact opposite of what they said happens happens, so it’s sort of “Opposite Day,” really.

Guy Lawrence: It’s still; it’s incredible that it’s come to this. Like, it blows me away.

Stuart Cooke: It is crazy. I had also read a little bit about a study in the South Pacific as well. I was reading about that. I wondered if you could elaborate on that for us?

Grant Schofield: That’s just, we’d been doing this diabetes prevention work in the South Pacific islands and, you know, there’s a lot of South Pacific island countries, and there’s quite a lot of them. And if you wanted to; the Pacific, the South Pacific islands have probably suffered some of the worst obesity and chronic disease of anywhere around the world, but it’s not uniform across those islands. And I think it’s interesting.

You go to the best of them, which would be something like Southern Vanuatu, and these are islands; I mean, what actually happened in the end is an air force pilot called John Frum from the States turned up in World War II and started one of these cargo cults around the islands, sort of the beginning of a religion, and it’s interesting. They noticed that he did no actual work or anything that was XXunknownXX. He marched around and raised American flags and eventually got upon a funny box and stuff arrived and, “Hey, that sounds good.”

But he had one religious message which I think actually pans out to be a good one, which was something like: “Look, white guys are gonna turn up here. Don’t trust them.” And so what you’ve seen in these islands is really XXall-outXX development. So, there’s still a traditional subsistence living, and, really, a complete absence of chronic disease. So, there’s big, strong, healthy men and women and vibrant kids.

And the thing is, you look at the food supply and, you know, it’s eating whole plants and animals, but it’s very high in saturated fat from the coconut products. So, it’s probably about 60 percent of calories by saturated fat, with no chronic disease.

If you go to the other end, the worst of the Pacific are these countries like XXKiribatiXX and Tuvalu, which are all quite small coral atolls that; XXKiribatiXX, the main island is Tarawa, it’s only a metre by sea level, except for the large piles of rubbish which sort of go beyond that. And irregardless of this, the kids are all malnourished. And so, on a calories-in, calories-out, we think Mum and Dad must be eating all the food. Which isn’t the case. The kids aren’t getting the fat and protein. They’re malnourished. The adults are metabolically disregulated and diabetic.

We tested the; I was just showing the diabetes team how to test for fasting blood glucose, and 10 out of 10 had a fasting blood glucose above 10 millimoles, which is; five is acceptable. That’s the prevention team is completely uncontrolled diabetes, and it’s running about 70 percent in the population.

And you try and, you walk around there with your XXmanual guideXX, “Look, if you could just move a bit more,” that’s not relevant. “And just eat a bit less and cut down your saturated fat,” you know. It’s so ridiculous that you wouldn’t even; it would come out of your mouth when you see the food supply, which is instant noodles, rice, sugar, and flour.

So, it becomes very obvious that there’s a metabolic problem with these simple carbohydrates. We’ve done XXit with thisXX, so.

Guy Lawrence: That’s amazing. And that’s what the Heart Foundation, they’ve got the tick of approval on half the products that you just mentioned.

Grant Schofield: That’s right. It really becomes obvious at that point that, at least in that situation, that’s not the problem. Fat’s not the problem, at least.

Stuart Cooke: It’s interesting. I’m just going to mix a few of these questions around a little bit, Guy.

Guy Lawrence: Knock yourself out, man.

Stuart Cooke: So, over here, you know, obviously, the Australian Heart Foundation recommends a low fat, high-carb diet. And how similar is it over in NZed?

Grant Schofield: Yeah, well, I just think it’s; what actually happened this week was sort of a perfect storm, really, of the British Medical Journal paper on saturated fat, the ABC shoes in Australia attracting a lot of attention in New Zealand, and we had a two-page feature article on low-carb, high-fat in the national newspaper, all within two days of each other. So it was a perfect storm as far as I was concerned.

It did a few things. First of all, it attracted a media release from some of the big, old professors of nutrition here undersigned by the head of virtually every health agency in the country about the dangers that this posed, and, sort of, meant to calm the masses.

It was all sort of ridiculous. But also, the Heart Foundation was about to release its new food XXpictures that weekXX, so they’ve put a hold on that until the masses control themselves.

But I think I have moved to more of a Mediterranean-style diet. I started to move away from the whole grains. And I think sometimes the reasons you go to the heart foundations and diabetes and feel like you’re not moving, there’s a lot of forces there that push them around. There’s food and food companies. There’s government. There’s scientists from all walks.

They are moving. They haven’t got to the saturated fat thing. So, you know, I think rather than turning into a fight, you know, when you become enemies it’s hard to have a productive and fruitful conversation.

So, we’re trying. … So, I’m happy now. Just keep moving.

Guy Lawrence: Hey, I hear the Swedish government recently turned their laws around with saturated fat. Have you heard anything about that?

Grant Schofield: Yeah, well, that’s; they did quite a big review because there’s; Sweden is relatively progressive. They’ve also had a longer history of that complaint around the delivery of low-carb, high-fat medicine, which was upheld, thankfully. So, I think they have probably moved ahead.

Look, I think the evidence says that eating a diet that’s low of dietary carbohydrates and higher in fat, as long it’s not all processed food, it’s likely to be highly healthy. XXThere’s random controls. It’s fine on all of them; carrying the metabolic ??? went wellXX.

People then seemed to object to the idea that there’s not long-term health data when we’ve had people on these diets for 50 years. It’s true we haven’t done those studies, but, equally, there’s; we are talking about the sort of foods that humans have eaten for 99 percent of the time they’ve been on the planet.

And, you know, humans, contrary to popular belief, didn’t die at age 30. The XXnormal age of death was probably somewhere near the 70sXX. So, on the basis of pure scientific common sense, I’ve begun with this approach to start with.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, you only have to look at the overweight statistics, you know, here in Australia, and the same with chronic disease as well. It’s not getting better.

Stuart Cooke: Something’s going wrong.

Grant Schofield: I guess the other approach, way of approaching it, is to go, well, in public health we talk about these health inequalities, that different things affect people differentially, and we get really concerned about that. But we don’t make the healthy get healthier and the sick get sicker. And why take on that as well, you know, a high-carbohydrate, low-fat, whole-food diet can work for some people. There’s evidence of that. But I think it works for the most insulin-sensitive of us, the people least prone to chronic disease.

And, for the people who are least insulin-sensitive, most easily metabolically disregulated. And they tend to also be our poorest in this country XX??? PacificXX people. It may do harm. And that’s another thing to consider.

Guy Lawrence: Absolutely. Do you think the Heart Foundation will ever change their minds about this? You know, will they accept it or…

Grant Schofield: You know, and I think people come in and say, “Hey, you were right. Let’s change their minds.” I think they move more slowly than that. I think; people can ask me about government guidelines and Heart Foundation guidelines. Look, if this changed overnight, would it change the world? I don’t think it would. I think what will change the world is the fact that the world has changed electronically, that things like this, these podcast and the intelligent blogger and the open access of science, I think that the people will change this through pure experimentation and common sense.

I already see that the movement for low-carbohydrate and healthy, whole-food eating will come from the people, not from the government or the Heart Foundation. So, that will take time as well. But the world’s different.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Yeah. That’s a good point. I’d like to clear up a bit of confusion as well around the topic of fats, because with this message getting out there, I know some people who think they’ll be able to look at potato chips and go, “Oh, there’s fat content in it; it’s quite high,” then it’s gonna be OK to eat that? You know?

And I see this, you know, and I’m, like, “Jesus.”

Grant Schofield: It has consequences.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Yeah. So, I’d love if you could just sort of, you know, what fats should people be eating, what fats should people be avoiding, how can they simplify it?

Grant Schofield: Well, I think there’s two levels of that. The first is that you’ve made a good point: that you eat a diet low in fat, or high in fat and low in dietary carbohydrates, that’s fine, and I think as long as the fats are fats that have come from foods that have existed naturally on the planet: animal saturated fats, those in plants, avocados, nuts, seeds, those sorts of things.

As soon as you start to muck with them and turn them into these industry seed-type oils, these Omega-6 and transfats, then I’d just be avoiding those altogether. In our house, we have butter, we have coconut oil, and we have olive oil. That’s what we have as added fats. And then it’s the XXcuringXX of some sort of plant or animal. That’s what I’d go with.

I guess the second point that you’ve made, which is probably more important, is if you combine fat with processed carbohydrates, then you’re on the standard industrial food diet and, as we, know, that’s got a really nasty ending.

And so they have been including high-protein, high this, high that, but I really think you can classify diets into three categories in terms of macronutrients. A low-fat diet, which, by definition will be high-carbohydrate, even if you over-consume protein, that will be turned into glucose anyway through the liver. At the other end, you’ve got a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet. And in the middle you’ve got the standard industrial diet, which is high in both. So, that’s the choice. So, I think we should be going for the one lowest in carbohydrates.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah. It’s interesting. I guess I hope that when people realize that they need to make the shift to a diet higher in fats, then they don’t presume that all of the bottles of sunflower oils on the shelves with the Healthy Heart Foundation tick is the go-to fat. Because they’ve got beautiful pictures of, you know, smiling people and healthy hearts on there.

Grant Schofield: Yeah, I mean, it’s sort of; forget the glycemic index, the GI factor, and go for the HI, the Human Interference factor. If you can tell it was alive very recently, eat it.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, no, it’s a good point. Do you think this dietary approach is recommended for everybody, or perhaps more specific to those seeking weight loss?

Grant Schofield: Ah, well, I mean, it can be effective for weight loss, but I think, you know, weight loss is usually a symptom of metabolic dysfunction. If you’re insulin-resistant, if you’re lethargic, if you’re low on energy, getting afternoon crashes, I think this is a fantastic way to go.

I mean, frankly, I don’t have a weight problem but one of the main reasons I keep on a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet is the cumulative and energy benefits, and I think anyone who does this sort of thing will attest to that. You’re not falling off a glucose cliff every three hours, so you’ve just got this constant energy, you can miss meals, you can have a flexibility in choosing your eating, and all of sudden you can deal with this much better.

XXI hear all that stuff about ????; it’s just not ???XX Metabolics drive behind it.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, it’s huge. Because once you’re metabolically changing, you’re fat-adapted. Because I eat a high-fat diet. If I eat carbs, it knocks me out. It’s as simple as that. I don’t feel great. I mean, I have some, but I’ve very conscious of what ones I eat, but my appetite is; my energy, mood, appetite is just fantastic.

And the other thing that I notice as well is that I don’t crave the other foods, the sweet stuff and everything else, you know, Once I adapted to this way of eating, I kind of look through them foods, you know? And it’s almost like I want people to just eat like this for a couple of weeks just to understand that feeling, you know? Because some people, if they’ve been on sugar all their lives, they’re not even gonna know what it feels like.

Grant Schofield: Well, I’d like to get the academics who criticize us or the practitioners who criticize us, just to try this as an approach. For goodness sake, just try things and example the physiology on yourself. Like, it’s not; it’s like being in the personal training business and telling people how to do pushups. Or, say, “Go do pushups,” and you’ve never done one. I mean, it would be laughable. You’d be laughed at XXat the gym? Like a chump?XX

Stuart Cooke: Guy mentioned fat-adapted. How far do we need to go to actually reap the benefits of a high-fat diet? Do we need to go as far as ketosis?

Grant Schofield: You know, that’s something I think we still need to do more research on. I don’t know the answer to that. I’ve experimented with myself and others that are getting into their fat-adapted state by doing it on a gradual basis and just gradually reducing their carbohydrates. The trouble with that method is, you can end up in a bit of a gray zone of actually not fully adapting. And your brain’s still dependent mostly on glucose, but you haven’t got it quite good enough, and it can be a nasty little state to be in. But I, my personal opinion, there’s not much science on this, is that if you’re going to get fat-adapted, get very strict and drop your carbohydrates right down to the ketosis, 50 grams a day, top level, for a few weeks, get fully fat-adapted, and just see how you feel while introducing carbs again after that.

My view is that you really need to force that real XXfrustation?XX of substrate, especially ketones and b-hydroxybutyrate, to run the brain and other organs, modern humans don’t do that. So that can be difficult. But that’s my view. I don’t know what you guys’ view on it is.

Stuart Cooke: Well, I guess it’s a tricky one. And everybody, you know, we’re all built in a very different way, you know, metabolically as well. Some people are more attuned to just straight into ketosis, whereas others, you know, can take much longer.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Like, I’m 25 kilos heavier than Stu, right? And he eats twice as much food as me, easily. And, you know, his metabolism doesn’t turn off at all, ever. It’s incredible.

Stuart Cooke: Actually, I’ve got to eat now, Guy.

Yeah, no, it’s good.

I just thought we’d move into exercise now. And I know Guy’s got a question for you about…

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, I’m keen on this because, again, with exercise, you know, I think a lot of people can get confused with what they should be eating, especially around intensive exercise and endurance exercise. And I know you yourself have worked with a triathlete and an Iron Man. I’d love to hear your thoughts on the science, a little bit, behind all that.

Grant Schofield: Yeah, I think it’s very interesting. I mean, I’ve of course spent an entire career telling my people to supplement with carbohydrates and use those as they exercise all the time. We’ve done some work on a group of triathletes, mainly, actually.

I’ll just give you a case study as a nice example of the one elite Iron Man competitor that we’ve worked with. So, he was, first of all, he was 85 or so kilos. He was a bit shorter than me. And that was a limiting factor in his Iron Man performance. So, we put him on a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet for 12 weeks leading into Iron Man New Zealand last year.

First of all, he ripped down to 78 with no problems, 78 kilos, and was in the best shape of his life. But I think much more interestingly was how his fuel utilization changed across some different power outputs.

So, we were, probably, the easiest way to describe the way we measured his performance using breath-by-breath gas analysis, is we were calling this the metabolic efficiency point. What power could you produce when you were using 50 per cent of your fuel as carbs and 50 per cent of the fuel as fat, you know, just from your body. And we think that mix is about what you need to complete an Iron Man triathlon at the best possible speed. And you can go slower for an Iron Man and use more fat, or you can go faster but you won’t get there because you haven’t got enough carbohydrate on board or you XXunknownXX. So, about 50’s probably about right.

So, when we brought him into the 12-week phase, he was already pretty fit and he was a high-ish carbohydrate diet. He was at 50 per cent fat, 50 per cent carbohydrate utilization. He could push 130 watts, which will get you on the Iron Man very, very slowly. And, after 12 weeks, he switched that metabolic efficiency point to 330 watts, which will get you around, in this case, first place in the age group race that he was in.

Guy Lawrence: That’s over double.

Grant Schofield: What’s that?

Guy Lawrence: That’s over double.

Grant Schofield: More than double. Triple.

Guy Lawrence: Almost triple, yeah.

Grant Schofield: So, his maximal output hasn’t changed, but the point where he could, which he could sustain for a long time, using a lot of fat, had massively increased. So, that sort of change in fuel utilization is massive.

Now, unfortunately, what happened in that race, because everybody goes, “How did he do in the end?” well, he was first off the bike. He didn’t actually complete the race, not because he ran out of fuel, but he hit a XXnoise interferenceXX I’d been telling him XXnoise interferenceXX phase. I’m telling him, look, as you’re ditching the carbs, you must et more salt, especially if you’re feeling lightheaded, your kidney will be XXdealing sodium or potassiumXX. And what he needed was a couple of teaspoons a day.

And I hadn’t realized this, but in the month leading up to the race, I mean, he’s getting cramps every time he didn’t a flip-turn on the XXpoleXX. So, he really had a sodium problem that we never got on top of. He subsequently got on top of it and is doing very well.

But, you know, that’s just, I think, a good example. He got his weight down. Didn’t restrict his food intake. Trained and felt good. Felt he recovered better in the sense that he’s producing much less glycolysis, XXto offset the burdenXX carbs does to your body. And was a happy camper, really.

Stuart Cooke: What would he be eating during the event?

Grant Schofield: Well, that’s XXanother thingXX. We don’t give him “no carbs” during the event. These XXcreteXX cycle that burns carbohydrates reasonably fast, so we probably have the amount of carbohydrate. He had a gel an hour. He probably was doing two or three when he was carb-dependent, which acted XXas a kickstop, quite a lot of salty cashewsXX. And, yeah, that was better. So, you know…

And, you know, bacon and eggs for breakfast. Didn’t do anything else.

Guy Lawrence: And he wouldn’t have been carb-loading before the race.

Grant Schofield: No, no, no.

Guy Lawrence: Absolutely.

Stuart Cooke: So, what about the weekend warriors out there?

Grant Schofield: XXIt’s man-hours as well andXX I think a lot about that and do quite a lot of reading and thinking and research in that area. And I really think that you need to consider the difference between high performance and the health costs of that, and why you’re doing the event. So, my view is if you stop to think about easy movement and training that was mostly fueled by fat-burning, and then a middle zone that’s mostly fueled by; that’s hard-ish training that’s mostly fueled by carbohydrate, and then a very, very hard zone, which you could maintain sort of a XXminuteXX of, then I’ve really spend most of my time in that middle cardio zone. And I really agree with the Mark Sisson approach, which is it’s a chronic cardio type thing.

But the science is really, like, you’ve been in glycogen. You’re glycating tissues and creating glycating end products, you’re creating oxygen stress, XXunknownXX oxygen spaces. That has an immune cost and an inflammatory cost and an XXunknown systemsXX cost. And I don’t think that’s worth it. I don’t think you need to do that. The trouble with XXexcluding all that stuff inXX training, it’s actually quite good for your overall speed. So, you don’t get those threshold-type workouts. So, I would spend most of my time in an easier training zone burning fat. You get 99 per cent of the aerobic benefits, and the final 1 per cent you need to be really fast without any of the oxygen stress. And then I’ve spent a little bit of time with this very hard, sort of, sprinting. And, for me, I might do, say, 10 times one minute on the track running, one-minute rest. The rest of it 20-minute workouts.

Guy Lawrence: So, if you were a test subject who was not influenced by any beliefs or anything, and he said he wanted the ultimate optimum health exercise program. So, you know, I’m assuming most people exercise to feel good in their health, right? And then you’ve got the high-end athletes, of course, that are wanting achievement. What would the typical week look like? What would you include?

Grant Schofield: Well, I think it should be a mix of easy and hard exercise, but I also think that the demands of that exercise should change quite a lot. And that sort of falls under the theory of hormesis, which means that we should suffer stress and then that the stress should be mild enough that we can adapt to it, but not too mild. And I think when you start to just do something like one sport, like running and swimming or cycling or, you know, you don’t; then you get into a stage where you’re not providing stress to a whole lot of the body but providing too much stress to another part. So, you know, that’s the opposite; that promotes fragility and not resilience.

So, you know, my week now is I’ll start, return from work, I would; I’d walk the dog, I might run the dog, I might sprint the dog. He always beats me but it’s always fun.

Stuart Cooke: Just change your food. Change his food. It will be fine.

Grant Schofield: Yeah, exactly. I might run up some steps. I might go to the gym. You know? I’ll never be there more than 20 minutes and then my whole body sort of exercises. I might do that on a tree down at the beach. Whatever. XXI’m a terrible thinkerXX. But I’ll even, I’ve sort of copied one of those Australian guys. I’ve been watching this sort of XXzooXX stuff where, you know, it’s a very short exercise. Are you familiar with that?

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, good natural movement; that kind of stuff.

Grant Schofield: Yeah. I mean, we’ll be on the XX??XX, transition into a sprinting back-and-forth and people are sort of looking at you like you’re crazy, but who cares?

Stuart Cooke: Now, that’s right. What are your thoughts on CrossFit? How does that fall into the lifestyle?

Grant Schofield: I’ve done CrossFit. I quite like it. I don’t think it’s particularly safe, at least the ones I’ve been to. I mean, you tend to go so hard that it’s very hard to keep a form that isn’t gonna do some damage. Or at least that’s what I’ve found, because I’m like, “I’m gonna beat that guy.” And if you’re a little less competitive maybe. It doesn’t really work for me, at least.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely. I think it all comes down to the trainers in the actual gym themselves, if they’re onto it, it’s a pretty safe place to be. But if they’re not, then, yeah, absolutely.

Grant Schofield: XXI’ve only been to one spot.XX

Guy Lawrence: OK. I’d love to touch on as well, calorie counting. Because you mentioned it earlier. Especially with exercise as well, and weight loss. Everyone seems obsessed with counting calories. What are your thoughts on that? I’d love to hear a professor’s thoughts on counting calories.

Grant Schofield: Well, I mean, at one level, you can’t defeat the law of thermodynamics, that if more energy goes in than out, or vice-versa, then something will happen to that system.

But the behavioural aspects of that are hormonally regulated, and the partitioning of those calories are hormonally regulated. So, really, it becomes stupid to be thinking about the calories.

My view is sort of three-fold. One is that under metabolically well-regulated conditions, humans will self-regulate both energy in and energy out. When they become metabolically disregulated, through any of the mechanisms that make you insulin-resistant, be it high sugar, high trans Omega-6 fats, a lack of sleep, too much stress, too much exercise, too little of exercise, smoking, XXpollution?XX, whatever it is, then all bets are off. You won’t behaviourally control your nutritional calories.

Stuart Cooke: I heard a great analogy of the kitchen sink, when the, you know, the tubes and the pipes are clean, you can fill up; you just keep the tap running and it will just flow. But the moment the pipes become blocked, that’s when you start to get issues.

Grant Schofield: Yeah, that’s what Jonathan Baylor and those guys are saying, XXeating stuff differentlyXX, and I really like that. I think it’s dead right.

And the compelling thing is also this study last year in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Ebbeling and Ludwig and Co. And it’s just massively convincing. When they get a whole bunch of people to lose weight using the same strategy, once they’ve lost, basically, between 10 and 15 percent of their body weight, they randomize them to different types of isocaloric diets.

And this was a hugely expensive, massive study. It’s a metabolic XXwork?XX study. People come and stay there. They get measured very carefully in terms of their energy expenditure and they eat exactly what they’re supposed to and you just notice that on different diets, even with the same amount of calories, energy in and energy out aren’t the same. So, when you feed people a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, they down-regulate their energy out. When you feed them a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet, then they up-regulate their energy up. So, the difference is really 300 calories, which is XX????XX

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, it’s interesting, because last year I did a little self-experiment when we were with family at holiday, and I ate around 6,000 calories at day for two weeks. Yeah. It was a real affair of it. I struggled to move for about an hour after each meal. And, just to see what would happen. And at the end of the holiday, I’d lost a kilo and a half.

Grant Schofield: So, you were eating a high-fat, carbohydrate-restricted diet?

Stuart Cooke: I was eating pretty clean. Lots and lots of meat and veggies. You know, carbs were few and far between. But, boy, I was piling it in. And it just didn’t work for me. I thought I’d beat the system, but it beat me.

Probably, people go online and Google Sam Feltham, the UK, he says 5,000 calories high-fat and 5,000 calories high-carb.

Grant Schofield: I can imagine the outcome.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, it’s not pleasant on the high-carb.

Grant Schofield: No, absolutely not. But it’s good to do these things. I would imagine, because we’re talking about the fact that everyone’s different, and, you know, we metabolise things in a different way, I wonder what would happen if you did that, Guy, and put yourself on a…

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely.

Guy Lawrence: I’ve done a high-fat, high-calorie diet. And I continue to; my weight remained stable the whole time. I did it for four weeks. Going back a couple of years ago now, but I was drinking gallons of coconut cream, coconut fats, eggs, and absolutely cranking it up. But the one thing I did was keep my carb intake under a hundred grams a day. And I was cycling probably 20Ks a day at the time and lifting weights, because I was working as a personal trainer in the city. And my strength continued to increase and my body fat remained stable.

Grant Schofield: It really refutes the whole notion, doesn’t it, of calories-in, calories-out.

Guy Lawrence: Absolutely. I, personally, I think if somebody wants to count something, count the carbs, not the calories. And actually make the food count that goes in your mouth. You know, eat nutrient-dense food, not deprive yourself of it.

Grant Schofield: In a lot of criticisms, people say to me, “You’re talking about a diet, asking people to stick to it.” It’s not very hard. I mean, you can eat as much as you want. The food’s really yummy. And I’m not seeing the downside to this.

Stuart Cooke: No. That’s right. There is no downside.

Guy Lawrence: If we decided to undertake this change tomorrow, for our own health, and, I guess, general awareness, what kind of testing would you recommend that we underwent, thinking along the lines of things like glucose and cholesterol, et cetera?

Grant Schofield: Yeah, I mean, the things you can get from your local doctor, your lipid profile and HbA1c for glucose are all interesting. I mean, the problem is, of course, the typical general practitioner looks at him and goes, “Oh, no, your total cholesterol has gone up,” which it probably will. And so people need to go over the research about that, and I think, you know, as long as the HDL and triglyceride XXratio??XX holds up, triglycerides will probably go down. And the HbA1c, which is this long-term measure of your control of glucose in the blood will almost certainly go down.

I think those are good indicators. Blood XXglucose?XX as well is, of course, interesting. I would much rather do more complex tests, and I think the two that are most interesting to people that we haven’t got sorted yet, but I’d love to see more widely available, is there’s a way of; I mean, you can measure blood glucose through a finger prick. I’d love to be able to measure serum insulin using the same technique. Because I think it’s a really dynamic insulin response that matters. And it’s fabulous to track that.

And the second thing which we have available, and it just costs a lot of money, but I can’t see why someone can’t invent a portable unit that can plug into your iPhone or something is this breath-by-breath gas analysis. Because it really XXproxies?XX; insulin controls your ability to burn fat or carbohydrate as a fuel. When insulin’s raised, you won’t burn fat. You’ll only store it. When insulin is reduced, you’ll burn fat as your primary food source.

And it’s very easy to measure that through the expired contents of your breath. It would be fabulous if it was available. And that’s what we’re trying to do more with.

Stuart Cooke: That’s interesting. Yeah. I would certainly welcome that. It sounds like something for the future, for sure.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, it’s hard for people to get their mindset anywhere else, especially when, if they go to doctors and they get the conventional wisdom, like the whole system sort of funnels you in a certain direction and it’s very hard to step outside of that.

Grant Schofield: I look at my mother’s totals, she’s on a low-carb, high-fat diet, of course, at age 70, and her total cholesterol is too high and doctors told her to do the following: “Look, eat more whole grains for the next month, and if that doesn’t improve, we’ll put you on a lipid-lowering medication.”

Stuart Cooke: Oh, crikey.

Grant Schofield: We moved her in the end. It’s ridiculous.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, well, that’s right. I wonder if he asked her how she felt. “How do you feel?” “Well, I feel great!” Wonderful.

Grant Schofield: It was beyond… But, you know, the other thing sort of in that same thing as the Heart Foundation thing, I think it’s especially so in the U.S., but it certainly applies in Australia and New Zealand as well, is these guidelines that these guys are put under. “This is what you do for this.” You know, it’s literally malpractice not to prescribe a statin medication for high cholesterol. So, you do feel for these guys.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, no, absolutely. They’re just following the circuit, I think.

Guy Lawrence: I’m just going to ask what you eat every day. What is your typical daily diet?

Grant Schofield: So, what I had this morning, I just whipped up a sort of four-egg omelet fried in coconut oil made with whipping cream and I had some cheese on top. I would have actually preferred to put some more vegetables in there, but there weren’t any around this morning.

Last night for dinner we had pork ribs with a bit of a salad with XXoil in itXX. I was sort of picking through all the bones from the kids and stuff, because they only eat all the meat off the ribs so I sort of go through all the leftovers.

I was actually still a little bit hungry, so I ended up with some berries. Berries are pretty nutrient-dense, with some whipped cream and a bit of some almonds.

Guy Lawrence: Very nice.

Grant Schofield: And lunch I had sort of one of those high-fat salads, you know, put as many bits of vegetables as I could find lying around and then just added some cheese and nuts and meat.

Guy Lawrence: Fantastic.

Grant Schofield: It’s nice. I’m not hungry. I feel full of energy and I’m at a stable weight.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah. Lots of nutrients.

Guy Lawrence: Real food.

Grant Schofield: I just want to say, you can ask anyone who actually finds this controversial who’s watching it, especially in the science community, just kind of try this. See how you feel and make your own mind up. Don’t criticize people and go, “Well, I’m not sure about the long-term randomized control trials.” I mean, the basic physiology supports this way of eating and people feel great and operate well. So, you know, their well-being is better.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Fortunately for us, because we do what we do, we get to speak to many people like yourself, Grant, and, you know, there are so many great people out there speaking and living and breathing and doing this, you know. And it’s, like you say, just try it for a little period of time and see how you feel.

Grant Schofield: And if they feel like rubbish, they can document that and if they want, they can go back and everyone’s happy.

Guy Lawrence: Absolutely. You mentioned berries. What would; I love asking this question: What are your thoughts on fruit?

Grant Schofield: I mean, I’ll eat fruit in smallish quantities. If you try and do a low-ish, a fairly low carbohydrate diet, it’s hard to have that much fruit and not take your carbs that high. But if you want to have grapes, go for it, I mean. I think it’s probably a good way to supplement, especially in some more intense exercise before or after that session.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, that’s when I generally do it. After training. Yeah, David Gillespie, we had him on the show a few weeks back, and he said treat it as nature’s dessert. And I thought that was…

Grant Schofield: Yeah, that’s probably it. He’s got a good point there. It’s fine. The other thing about fruit, of course, I mean, you know, just think about the history of humans. There have been fruit lying around to gather. It’s not essential for human survival, but it’s nice and it’s there and it’s; go for it.

Guy Lawrence: And I guess prior, you know, it was always seasonal, so you’d get what the season provided, but now, of course, we’ve got every season under the sun on offer.

Grant Schofield: Yeah. Well, I think that’s a very good point is probably one that I’ve been thinking more and more about scientifically and experimenting with is, and people do this sort of a week where they might have a pattern that actually changes quite a bit, so there will be generally quite low-carbohydrate and might have some periods of fasting. You know, go through some periods of actually eating a meal or two quite high in carbohydrate.

And I think there might be some merit in that in the sense that there’s two conditions there, which I think are both essential to human health. One’s the anabolic, which is rebuilding and growing cells. You know, that’s an inflammatory state and temporarily, that’s good. So, you do need that anabolic state, and I think insulin through dietary carbohydrates can provide that.

Equally, you also want that catabolic state where there isn’t any food, and the human cells don’t divide and they start to scavenge and repair and we get this production of the XXtrehalose???XX and these sorts of enzymes that start to clean up XXthe DNA endsXX and that sort of thing. So, I’ve been thinking a lot about, not so much a low-carb, high-fat way of eating the whole time, but perhaps cycling more in and out of what is more of a human condition. And, I mean, you don’t have to go by week or anything, but I think there might be some merit in that.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah. No, that’s right. Almost like a periodic system reboot.

Grant Schofield: Yeah. And I think the dangers, if you’re going low-carb all the time, that you start to down, I think there’s some evidence that you start to down-regulate some things, especially lectin, and it’s probably worth a bit of a reboot.

Guy Lawrence: That’s interesting. I’ve never thought about that.

Grant Schofield: XXThere’s not been a lot of science on thatXX, by the way. And probably won’t be for a long time because no one wants to fund this sort of stuff, but that’s another story.

Stuart Cooke: Of course.

Guy Lawrence: Any special requirements for children? I mean, many people think, “Well, children need their carbs because they’re so active.”

Grant Schofield: Right. I mean, my kids are, I’ve got three boys, they’re on a low-carb, high-fat diet, but they don’t know they are. They grew up with that and seem to be functioning all right. But the thing is, they’re not metabolically disregulated. They are fine. They eat carbs and they get dealt with. They come and go. And that’s fine. Then they have the occasional junk food party or something and I’m comfortable with that.

What I’m not comfortable with is, I saw a boy yesterday in a practice-type situation, and he’s 11, obese, and he is metabolically disregulated. He’s highly insulin-resistant. And he’s saying to me, “Well, I eat the same amount as my mates. I do the same XXliving regime?XX, and they’re skinny and I’m not.” And so he can’t deal with the dietary carbs in the same way and we have to rethink that.

And that’s an interesting thing. He’s been to a bunch of specialists who have sent him away, told him to eat less and move more. When nothing’s happened, they’ve told him that he must be stealing food and he must be too lazy. And he can’t help but get to tears. It’s disgusting.

And, to put that in context, these kids get bullied. I asked this young man, I said, “Look. Do you think about your weight?” And he’s, like, “Oh, I do.” “Much?” “Yeah, quite a bit. About 99.9 percent of the time.” And, you know, a tear comes to you. This 11-year-old boy. So, some kids will need to do something about their carbs. But the metabolically healthy ones, there’s more flexibility.

Stuart Cooke: That’s right. Yeah. Just get away with it, I guess.

Guy Lawrence: Very good. All right. I was just looking at the time. We’ve got a wrap-up question, Grant, that we ask everyone every time we’re on the air and it doesn’t have to be nutrition-related at all. But what’s the best single piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Grant Schofield: Well, it’s no so much advice as an insight. Look, I just clearly remember a day in my life where something clicked for me and I don’t know if people have had the same experience when they’re students at school, but I remember the teacher going, “Ah, yes, he’s very bright” (not referring to me, of course) “but he just doesn’t try.” And I remember that point going, that fundamentally misses the point, because achieving in life is nothing to do with being bright or smart. It’s to do with knowing how to try. And the myth that you don’t know how to try means that you’re stupid by definition.

So, I just remember the teacher saying that and me thinking, “That just doesn’t make any sense.” So, you know, my advice to, I had to speak to a high school XXclass?XX the other day, and what I’d like to see in my kids, it may not turn out this way, is that; I don’t know what the world’s gonna look like, I don’t know what job you’re gonna do, but whatever you do, you’d better be good at it. The only way to be good at it is to follow what you’re passionate about, work to your strengths, and know how to try.

If you don’t know how to try, good luck. It’s not gonna turn out well. But if you can, it will all work out.

Stuart Cooke: Just try. Yeah.

Guy Lawrence: Give it a go. Absolutely.

And us Aussies, if we want to know anymore about you, where’s the best place to go, Grant?

Grant Schofield: OK, so, my best place is my blog, which is ProfGrant.com.

Guy Lawrence: I’ll share that link anyway. I’ll get it out on the blog as well. And, yeah, I was checking it out today. There’s some cool stuff. How long have you been blogging for?

Grant Schofield: I’ve only been blogging for about six months. I just sort of thought I should; I was talking a lot and not putting it anywhere. I found it a thoroughly fulfilling experience, the interaction with people and the ability to actually get your thoughts down coherently. It’s a great deal of fun.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely. Absolutely.

Grant Schofield: And of course it gets hundreds of thousands of hits, which also surprises me.

Stuart Cooke: You’ll have to sell a range of t-shirts.

Grant Schofield: “All you’ve got to do is try.”

Guy Lawrence: Awesome, Grant. Well, look, we really appreciate your time today, and I’m sure a lot of people will get a lot out of this. That was fantastic.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely.

Guy Lawrence: That was really cool.

Grant Schofield: Thanks, guys. I appreciate it. I love talking about it.

Guy Lawrence: No worries. You’re welcome, mate. Thank you.

If you want to teach an old dog new tricks, apply the 10 : 20 : 70 ratio

Old_dog_new_tricksBy Eleasa Mullavey

“The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education”
Albert Einstein

Have you ever attended a course, workshop or conference and left completely inspired, however within a week fallen back into old habits – the new learning but a blip in the memory? Or maybe you have unsuccessfully tried to learn a new language? Or perhaps attempted to educate yourself with view to change your lifestyle, diet or exercise regime only to fall back to status quo? I can put my hand up for all of these – as I think many of us can. More

How to Create Zen Like Goals & Love the Process (not just the end result)

Be SMART

By Eleasa Mullavey

“Happiness grows less from the passive experience of desirable circumstances than from the involvement in valued activities and progress towards ones goals” David Myers & Ed Diener

People who set and pursue goals are more likely to succeed and experience positive emotions than people who do not. Plain and simple it’s the first step toward lasting change and greater fulfillment.

A goal can be seen as an explicit commitment that focuses our attention on the target. In doing so it opens us up to possibilities that may help us get there. It makes these possibilities relevant. Psychologists refer to this experience as throwing your backpack over the brick wall. It’s a leap of faith, a commitment to yourself and others of what you desire for your future.

So what are your health related goals? Do you have any? Have you written them down? Does anyone else know about them?

It you’ve answered NO to some or all of these questions, you’re not alone. Interestingly, most of us don’t set goals in any area of our life and even less of us write them down. Of those who set goals, the majority don’t know how to do it in a way that will increase motivation and chance of success.

So How do I set goals I can achieve?

I always tell my clients to make sure their goals are SMART:

Specific: Define exactly what you want to achieve. Rather than I’m going to exercise more, specify how much? When? What type of exercise?

Measurable: How are you going to measure your success? Make sure your goals are measurable so that you can objectively assess how well you are doing along the way. If you plan to increase the amount you exercise, specify how much time you plan on exercising in one session?  What intensity? Keep a record of this.

Attractive and Accountable: To make goals more attractive ask yourself why you want to achieve this goal? How can you make it more attractive? I always tell my clients to make sure goals are set with a positive reference. Something they are striving towards rather than trying to avoid- “to have enough energy to spend quality time with my children”, rather than “ to avoid a heart attack”. This will significantly increase your motivation.

To increase accountability, ask yourself who knows about my goal? As a coach, I hold my clients accountable. Make your friends, parents & colleagues your health coaches. Tell then what you are going to achieve and when. If you’re game, put it on facebook. On twitter. The more people you tell the greater the chance of success. One of my clients who is an author uses this strategy. She tells her readers when the next book is to be released before she has even started to write the book. How’s that for a way to get you moving?

Realistic: Whilst I wouldn’t mind fitting into size 6 jeans, given the fact that this has not been an option for me since I was 8 years old- its probably not a realistic goal. Nor a healthy one for that matter. So make sure your goals are realistic…. and healthy! Ask yourself if you can really achieve the goal? If it appears too hard, too big, too far in the future – break it down into smaller goals that can be realistically achieved.

Time-limited: Set specific start and finish dates. Let others know. If you have lofty goals, as most of us do, break them down into smaller goals. Success breeds success. One of my clients plans to run the Blackmore’s marathon next year. Problem is they don’t run and the overall goal has always been too overwhelming. So we have broken down the goal into smaller more achievable chunks. Instead of running 42kms next September, they are starting with something they feel they can achieve over the next month- walking/ jogging 3 times a week for 20 minutes.

Is pursuing a goal enough to make me feel happier? You bet!!

To make this point, I think I’ll tell you a story…. It’s from one of my favourite books- Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. In brief, the book describes a motorcycle mechanic who joins a group of elderly Zen monks on their climb to a Himalayan peak. The motorcycle mechanic, despite being the youngest and fittest was the only member of the group who struggled with the climb and gave up, whilst the elderly monks made it to the peak, almost effortlessly.

Why? You see, the motorcycle mechanic had focused solely on the destination, the Himalayan peak. On achievement of the goal. In doing so he became overwhelmed by what lay ahead, how far he still had to go. He lost his strength, his motivation to continue. The monks on the other hand also kept sight of the goal. However the difference between them and the motorcycle mechanic was they only used the Himalayan peak as a point of reference, to make sure they were still on the right track. For the monks reaching the peak of the mountain was not the most important part. It was knowing that they were heading in the right direction. This allowed them to enjoy each step along the way.

Whilst it is all good and well to set and achieve goals, make sure they do not become Gaols!! The real role of goal setting is to set us free so that we can enjoy the present, knowing we are heading in the right direction. Until next time. Keep striving!!

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