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How the Law of Attraction Works; The Scientific Explanation

The above video is 4:22 minutes long.

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Guy: Do you remember the movie The Secret? Ever since that movie came out people were talking about creating their reality and attracting riches beyond their wildest dreams! All a bit woo woo?

Well who better person to ask than a neuroscientist and psychologist who studies brain function and how it interacts with the world. In other words, he shares with us how our thoughts and subconscious beliefs play a big role in the quality of our experience of life! 

Dr Jeffrey Fannin

 

Our special guest today is Dr Jeffrey Fannin. He holds a Ph.D. in Psychology, an MBA and a Bachelor of Science degree in Mass Communications. He is the founder and executive director for the Center for Cognitive Enhancement and Thought Genius, LLC.

Dr. Fannin has extensive experience training the brain for optimal brain performance working with head trauma, stroke, chronic pain, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD), anxiety disorders, depression, trauma recovery. His research and experience also extends into high performance training, such as: personal achievement, performance brainmapping for sports, enhancing leadership skills through brainwave entrainment; improving brain function and to enhance mental and emotional dexterity and personal transformation.

Full Interview: Tapping into the Law of Attraction, Subconscious Beliefs & Maximising Brain Power

Audio Version:

In This Episode:

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  • Where to start if you struggle with meditation
  • How we create our daily reality with our thoughts
  • How to calm down anxiety and mind chatter
  • How to create energy coherence throughout the body to feel energised
  • What brain mapping over 3000 advanced meditators over the last 3 years has taught him
  • And much much more…

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Full Transcript

Hey, this is Guy Lawrence of 180 Nutrition and welcome to today’s health sessions. We have an awesome guest for you today and his name is Dr. Jeffrey Fannin. Now, he’s the founder and executive director for the Center of Cognitive Enhancement and Thought Genius. Now, he’s also an international authority and speaker in the field of neuroscience research. In a nutshell, he’s a brain expert and understands the brain, how it operates. He has extensive experience training the brain essentially for optimal brain performance and he’s been doing this for 17 years.

It’s a podcast you’re going to have to hang on to your hats to a little bit and if it was the first time we had a brain expert on. Now, in a nutshell, he’s been working with people from such as like head traumas, attention deficit disorders, ADD, ADHD, anxiety disorders, depression, trauma recovery. He’s then worked on the other end of the scale for high performance training such as personal achievement, personal performance, brain mapping for sports, enhancing leadership skills and all this is through brain entrainment.

I have to say this is a podcast that goes in every direction totally and this one I’m definitely going to listen to again just to fully understand everything that was spoken about today. All I say is just keep an open mind and just absorb it and see how you go. There’s a lot of practical advice in there too.

Just to give a bit of background, I first met Dr. Fannin. I actually had a brain mapping consultation with him. I was fortunate enough to be in a Dr. Joe Dispenza workshop now a few months ago and if you’re not familiar who Dr. Joe Dispenza is, we actually interviewed him on the podcast a few months ago as well. I highly recommend you check that out because it’s going to be quite a correlation into today’s episode. Essentially, we went to basically a meditation boot camp, if you like, for four and a half days and they brought a team of scientists [00:02:00] in and measured the activity of the brain and the coherence and what was going on within the body. That was Dr. Fannin’s role so I got to know him them and then I’d have consultations since. It’s just been blowing me away with the information I’ve learned from it and now I’m just trying to bring it back in and apply it to my daily life because that’s what we want to do. You want to try and be the best version of yourself and move forward with that.

If ever you’re wondering why we think negative thoughts, why we can be in a state of anxiety half the time, why do we do the things we do even though we don’t want to be doing them and we have bad habits and all sorts and all sorts and react to situations when we don’t necessarily want to, then Dr. Jeff Fannin is going to certainly explain a lot of that today.

Strap yourself in and enjoy. All right, let’s go ahead to Dr. Jeff Fannin.

Hi, this is Guy Lawrence. I’m joined with Stuart Cooke as always. Hi Stuart.

Stu:                  Hello mate.

Guy:                  And our fanstastic guest today is Dr. Jeffrey Fannin. Jeffrey, welcome to the show.

Jeff:                  Hi, it’s a pleasure to be here. Thank you so much for having me on.

Guy:                  It’s greatly appreciated. Now you’re actually our first brain specialist so I think you need to go easy on us a little bit today, okay?

Jeff:                  I’ll try and do that, yeah.

Guy:                  It does get me thinking, if you sat in an airplane next to a complete stranger and they asked you what you did for a living, how would you answer that?

Jeff:                  That happens to me more frequently than you think. We might be at a dinner party or on an airplane or something like that and it always gets around to what do you do. I used to answer that in a variety of ways and I’ve tried to simplify it. Now I explain to people I’m a neuroscientist. Then they get this deer in the headlights look, just like oh my good, this guy’s reading my brain. Then they want to know more about that and so we ensue with that conversation. What does [00:04:00] that mean exactly?

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We measure brainwave activity and we do that through brain mapping. We do an EEG, electroencephalogram, and then we will convert that into a quantitative EEG which means that we look at all these little heads and the colors on there tells us what’s going on in the brain. With these consults that I do everyday for people all around the world that have been to one of Dr. Joe Dispenza’s events and we do brain mapping on them and then I can do an interpretation. We use a GoToMeeting like what we’re doing on Skype here. I bring up their brain map and I can show them here’s what’s working for you, here’s what’s not working for you.

We even have a lot of signatures from people who are highly intuitive and I’ll show them that signature and ask them a question, do you think that you’re intuitive and the stories I get after that are just amazing. Well, yeah, it comes out in this way and that way and so I’ll show them the pattern of here’s the part that is what we call clairsentient or you know things about people but you don’t know how you know it. Then I’ll show them the signature on the other side of the brain of this is when people are able to interpret other people’s emotional states and you can do that quite readily. Then they’ll have a lot of stories about that.

Everybody has that ability. The question is do people tend to cultivate that and so with these meditators that we work with all around the world, the one thing that I’m finding that’s really fascinating to me is when we look at their brain map that there are these markers. There’s about 12 markers and we see a great deal in consistency. Over the last three years that we’ve measured them [00:06:00] at these events, probably close to 3,000 people, and talking with them we see the same kinds of signatures. Some are more defined than other but these people have the same markers and those markers really are the starting point where the magic begins to happen for a lot of these people.

We measure people who have actually inter-dimensional experiences. They have beings that visit them during these events. We have a lot of people who have been able to do healing. We’ve got a lot of stories in Dr. Joe’s book You Are the Placebo: Making Your Mind Matter and a bunch of brain cases in there where people have gotten rid of brain tumors, people who have lessened the effects of Parkinson’s disease or Hashimoto’s disease. Over the years, we hear a lot of that going on.

Guy:                  To pull it back a bit from that just to get a bit of background on what you do. I know you’ve been doing this a long time. I think it’s about 17 years.

Jeff:                  Yeah, over 17 years now.

Guy:                  We’re always interested to find out a little bit about the journey because I knew you used to be a pilot. Is that correct?

Jeff:                  That’s true. In fact my keen ambition for a long time was to be an astronaut. At one time I had an appointment to the US Air Force Academy. My cousin was a former governor and senator of Arizona where I live. I didn’t live in Arizona at that time but my grades were good enough to capture an appointment to the Air Force Academy. Then the Vietnam War is [00:08:00] pretty heavy during that time. I didn’t know if I really wanted to be in the military. I want to be an astronaut. That was pretty clear from the time I was about nine or ten years old. I wrote letters to the Mercury astronauts back then. They actually sent me letters back. Their secretaries probably signed them but I cherish them and had a little scrapbook with their pictures and followed all the Mercury stuff.

When it got to the point of having to decide whether I was going to go into the Air Force Academy I didn’t know if I really wanted to have a career in the military. I ended up … They had a banquet where we got a chance to talk to a lot of the cadets and whatnot there. They explained what goes on. I got some bad advice from my father. He was on a submarine during World War II and he wanted me to go in the navy. I didn’t really want to be in service at all but decided that I was going to opt out of going to the academy. Then I went the long way around and became a pilot and used to fly tours of Grand Canyon, Lake Tahoe, Monument Valley, fire attack to the forest service, doing all of that. Then got my self to the airlines from that job and was with US Air and flying the tours and stuff like that.

Then I came around to getting a career in the airlines and got on with US Air and stayed there for a few years. I was based in Los Angeles, at LAX, living in Phoenix. Some people commute an hour to work in their car. I would go to the airport, get up the cockpit and the jump seat and commute an hour to work that [00:10:00] way. When they started having layoffs in the early ‘90s and my seniority number was in the middle of the stack so the first layoff that dropped me to the bottom of the stack and that was no fun because then I’d have to almost everyday go over to LAX and sit in the pilot lounge for several days in case they needed another crew and then you’d have to go out. It was just skuzzy that way.

Then they had another layoff and that dropped me out of the system. At that point I knew it’d be at least two or three years with the way the airline industry was going there in the ‘90s before I could get back in. At that time I decided I really want to follow more of this brain activity. A lot of guys that I would fly with, they said, I love flying with you because it’s like going to a Tony Robbins seminar in the cockpit because we’d talk about all this stuff that I was so passionate about and learning. That’s when I went back and got my PhD in psychology and then decided to go down this track and learned about brain mapping. After I got my PhD and started working with people and doing counseling and I decided there’s a lot of these people, they don’t really want to get well so I’m going to work with high performance with authors, professional athletes, people like that.

That was good and they’re a real quirky bunch. They want to do it but they don’t want to anybody to know they’re doing it.

Guy:                  Like it’s a secret weapon or something.

Jeff:                  Yeah, exactly. That’s exactly the way. If I’ve got an edge I don’t want you to know that I got an edge which is really interesting point of view. Anyway, from there I learned more about brain mapping and that really flipped my switch because the more [00:12:00] I learned about it the more I found out that there was to know and went down that road and then eventually met up with Dr. Dispenza. When we first got together it’s really a funny story of how we did get together. That I was speaking at an event of another friend of mind, Greg Reid, that does Secret Knock. He would bring me in periodically, still does, to do what I call brain magic from the stage.

We would put somebody’s brain live up on a big screen and I would show how they change subconscious belief patterns instantly and be able to show a whole bunch of different things. We would always have fun with that. While I was doing one of these, afterwards Doug caught my attention. He said, hey, come here. I need to talk to you. We started talking about the brain and what it does. Somehow we got on a subject of people that I wanted to meet and I said I have two people on the top of my list. One is Gregg Braden and the other is Dr. Joe Dispenza. I really want to meet these guys. He says, well I do work with Dr. Joe. He says, maybe we could get together on a Skype call or something. That sounded a lot to me like have your people call my people and we’ll do lunch kind of thing but it actually happened.

We got together and talked and Joe invited me up to the Seattle area. He was having a training with a bunch of his instructors. We started doing brain maps on all of them and I’m sitting there telling him all about these things that I could see on the screen. Then later that night when we’re having dinner, he said I’d been looking for somebody like you for three years.

I left out a piece of the story that’s really quite amusing here. That at the time I was actually reading Dr. Joe’s book, the Breaking the Habit of Being [00:14:00] Yourself and just mesmerized by the book. I had given Doug some of the papers that we had published from work that we had done at West Point which is another amusing thing that here I would have gone to the Air Force Academy and done that. Then I end up roundabout getting involved with a research team of Arizona State University and going to West Point and teaching them how to use their brains.

Guy:                  Wow, that’s quite a journey.

Jeff:                  Anyway, back to the story. Dr. Joe went to Doug and he was reading some of these papers that we published. He says, I don’t care what you have to do. Get me an appointment with this guy. I was doing the same thing. I went to Doug and I said Doug, you got to get me an appointment with him. This book is fascinating. Here we were both trying to connect then we connected and I went up to Seattle. From there he was getting ready to do one of his advanced meditative events here in Arizona so we hooked up with that. We didn’t even know whether we could measure anything. We just thought, hey, let’s get it a try so we did and we thought we measured something. Then the next event we did another one, we found more and more and more and so this thing has evolved to the point where it’s not uncommon for us to have 650 people in the room and I was brain mapping about 350 of those people during a five-day event.

Stu:                  You’ve spoken about the brain mapping and all of the analysis and the reporting that you would undergo while you’re doing that. Is that neurofeedback? Is that how you’d term …

Jeff:                  No, that’s very different. The brain mapping, you’re just measuring what’s going on in the brain under different conditions. Neurofeedback is when we are training the brain. Let’s suppose that we [00:16:00] see a very high elevation at some point in the brain. Let’s say it’s in the back of the brain, we see a lot of beta. That’s usually a pattern that’s consistent with anxiety. If we want to reduce that anxiety, we will set up a protocol to train the brain. We put the electrodes on the head and now with a lot of stuff we do, we put the cap on the head like we’re doing the brain mapping but we’re doing the brain training where we can train 5700 variables all at once.

You have to understand one of the basic elements of the brain. We have our thinking cortex, or the thinking part of our brain, it processes information at 40 bits per second. When you look at the subcortex, the subcortical region of the brain, it can process 40 million bits per second.

Guy:                  When you say subcortex, is that like the subconsciousness?

Jeff:                  That’s right, yeah. You can think of it that way. It can process a lot of information that we are not aware of. When we’re training the brain, let’s imagine that my finger here is like a thermometer of information going up and down. We have all of that high beta in the back of the brain that is consistent with the anxiety. We would then put a threshold on that so that would be where that tops out kind of like right there. Then if we want the brain to produce more of whatever it is, every time it goes above the threshold we’ll give it a reward. Every time it stays, if we wanted to produce less, every time it stays below that, then we’ll give the reward. The question is, what is the reward?

We can give it sound, ding, ding, ding, ding, ding kind of thing. There’s a part of the brain called the nucleus accumbens and that’s how we learn everything. If this then this. That’s how we learned. Night follows day. Our brain [00:18:00] is very simplistic in that process. When the brain is producing these frequencies and we give it this reward, ding, ding, ding, ding, every time it stays below the threshold, the brain goes oh, okay, I’m going to do that and so it does it over and over and over and over and over again. That’s called operant conditioning.

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What that does in the brain is it causes new dendrites to form and new neural pathways developed. That’s what is rewiring the brain. It’s the same thing as when you create a habit. They say it takes 21 days to create a habit. It takes 21 days for those neural pathways to entropy or to stop working.

Stu:                  Nowadays, we’re living in a society where we got signals coming from everywhere. We’ve got internet and mobile phone and constant chatter in our brains and a lot of us becoming more anxious and you’ve probably heard the term monkey mind, this endlessly chattering of the mind, never shuts off. How can we use your strategies to tackle this?

Because I know that sleep, for instance, can be an issue for people where their brains just don’t shut off and also mood, things like that. What can you do?

Jeff:                  Let’s talk about the two separate issues there. Let’s talk about the sleep first because that affects a lot of people. I think first of all, we’re … Let me put the sleep aside and lay some groundwork here. I think what happens with a lot of people, like you say we live in a society now where a lot of information is coming at us. Everybody’s got all kinds of gadgets that they use. Our brain is now evolving to a new element.

What happens is with all of that information that’s coming to us, we haven’t learned how to manage that information and so that’s why my [00:20:00] book coming out is called Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Me Hostage. That’s also the name of my radio show that I have recently.

The point being is as our brains are evolving to a new element, getting into the sleep issue for sure here. When we see a lot of activity in the front part of the brain, in what we call delta. The brain is producing a lot of frequencies all the time. Delta, theta, alpha, beta, a lot of people have heard those but they are faster in frequency. For example, when delta is the dominant factor that’s when you’re asleep. Here you are trying to get to sleep and you have all these beta or delta activity in the front, that’s when people’s sleep is disrupted. Their brain, that monkey mind in the brain so there you have busy mind, tossing and turning, they can’t shut some of that stuff off.

With the brain training or the neurofeedback that we use, we train the neurons to stop doing that and move towards normal and then they sleep better or they get rid of restless legs syndrome, stuff like that.

Stu:                  Is that a lengthy process of training or is it something that you can do quite quickly?

Jeff:                  The answer to that is yes. It depends on what modality that …

Stu:                  All of the above.

Jeff:                  Yeah. It’s like is it nature or is it nurture and scientifically, we know the answer to that is yes. It is both nature and nurture. To answer specifically your question, how long does it take, if we’re using neurofeedback only, then we find that it’s usually a four to five month process so when we’re working with sleep issues or attention deficit disorder or anxiety depression.

Neurofeedback has been around basically since the ‘60s [00:22:00] in working with that and now we’re coming into an era of energy-medicine integration and so we’re working a lot with stuff like that. Some of the research that we have been doing recently and seeing elements of the brain change very quickly. Meditation is another thing that people are able to change these elements to their brain.

I’ll give you an example of some of the things that we have done just in the way of research. We would find people … I had a person that we did an experiment with. She had a lot of that beta in the back of the brain, a lot of anxiety and stuff like that. We did a 30-day process with this person. Had her meditate for roughly 30 minutes a day doing … She would average that. Some days were longer meditation, some days were shorter, but as an average 30 minutes every day for 30 days and then we asked her to use what’s called a focused intention. She would at some point in her meditate … Well let me back up a little bit.

There is a process that Dr. Joe teaches about pulling energy up through the energy centers of the body, what we would call the chakras if you will. You pull this energy with this breathing technique up through your body and hold the energy there and then the energy is able to do things in your body. She would do maybe five or six of those breathing techniques before she started her meditation. Then at some point in her meditation she would use the intention. She would visualize the red areas in the back of her brain and we had her, just give her brain very simple instructions and that’s the intention. I would prefer the red to be green.

I didn’t say, okay, [00:24:00] I want to nucleus accumbens to do this and go in through the chiasm. It didn’t have to do that. Very simple instruction, I prefer the red to be green. We brain mapped her in 30 days later, after she had done that done that for 30 days and guess what, the red is green and her anxiety was reduced.

Stu:                  Do you … Sorry, guy, just one quickie. Do you support your techniques with any nutritional or supplements during this process?

Jeff:                  Absolutely. Nutrition is so vital in all of this. We’re starting to see where people are enhancing their internal capabilities. Let me come back to that particular issue but I need to lay some more groundwork. Guy looks like he’s going to explode if we don’t let him ask the question in.

Guy:                  The only point I was going to raise was, there’s a lot of people who might be suffering anxiety or monkey mind, can’t switch off. Actually to get them to sit down for even five minutes to just be still is a massive task. Because then the [crosstalk 00:25:16]

Jeff:                  That’s what I’m going to share with you, some other information. We just finished doing a six month-long project with a group called access consciousness. If people aren’t familiar with that, go google that and you’ll see that for 20 plus years they’ve been out there working with people in order to do a process called the bars.

Now I have never heard of this process called the bars. Again, I was doing my thing at Greg Reid and the Secret Knock and when I showed up and they are big fans of this and so Greg’s wife, Allen said, “Oh, oh you’re here. We got to connect you up with Gary and Dane and you’ve got [00:26:00] to do this brain map on the bars.” It’s like, “Okay, all right, yeah, that’s good, fine. I’ll do it.”

I’d never heard of that and so we did the brain maps on a few people that were having their bars run and then I was supposed to speak about it at 8:00 the next morning. Well, that’s kind of a dangerous proposition. Measuring something you’ve never measured before and then you’re going to get up on stage in front of 300 people and you’re going to talk about it, you know, when I’ve never heard of this thing.

By the time I get back to the hotel after dinner and stuff it was kind of late and I was tired. I need my full brain faculties to do that. We processed it and by 3 in the morning, I’m looking at this stuff and my jaw is just dropping. I’m going, whoa, brains of my world don’t do this. There is something up here. That’s when I measured it in a whole bunch of different ways, then got up and talked about it. I was just so excited. There’s a YouTube of me out there talking about that, that’s really amazing. From that we decided to do this full out, full blown study at a very high level and we’ve just gotten that.

This bars process they use acupressure so they put their fingers on the head and the acupressure causes the energy in the brain to begin to move and flow. Everybody has areas that get blocked but the energy is not flowing and that’s what slows down some of these process. Now as we look at energy medicine and energy healing and energy psychology, that’s the kind of stuff that we’re dealing with, we found that people’s energy align a great deal and some of these elements that we would see in their brain maps would disappear like in an hour and a half. [00:28:00] Now explain that to me.

When you’re talking about energy, that’s what’s going on in the brain. There’s a graphic that I use in a lot of my lectures and it’s called the thalamic gate. At the top of the thalamus and the brain is a little almond shaped thing right in the center of the brain and it regulates a lot of the frequencies that go on in our brain, in our body. At the top of the thalamus there’s a set of what’s called reticular cells. These reticular cells, a function of that is to allow cells to bind to the top of the thalamus so that other cells can then, like axonal columnar cells can develop out of that through the cortex up through from a subcortex into the thinking part of the brain and it comes out right here, the top center of our head which is basically the crown chakra.

What tends to happen here is that we look at energy in the field, in the morphogenetic field, the collective unconscious, whatever you want to call it. We call that oscillation. That energy is vibrating. We live in a vibrational universe and we are vibrational beings. This energy then comes down through the crown chakra, through the thalamic gate, gets into the thalamus and then it begins to resonate. That’s the energy in the cells of our body so there’s communication that goes on. When people have energy that is not flowing or that is blocked, that’s where we find that disease occurs. All disease is nothing more than disregulated energy. When you line the energy and the brain knows how to regulate itself then you get that regulation flowing then these conditions that we see, why is it that people that come to these events … one guy had a brain tumor and he’d been to two events and then he went [00:30:00] to have his brain scanned again at the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

When they came back in to give him the results, they said we can find no trace of the tumor and they said, come back in a couple more intervals and they still couldn’t find it. Why people get rid of the affects of Parkinson’s disease? We’ve seen brain elements change to help brain injury. I worked with professional athletes, football players in particular, that have brain injuries and we’re seeing some amazing changes on that. We’re moving into a new era where it’s going to change the way we understand healing in the world.

Stu:                  I just had a thought that occurred to me when you were speaking about the energy and how it moves from the top of the head all the way down to the different states of the body. Can we disrupt that energy flow with modern day devices? For instance …

Jeff:                  Yes, actually that does happen. I was doing some work with a physicist, Yury Kronn, and we were looking at cellphone emissions. The interesting thing about the cellphone industry is that you have usually three or four transmitters in the phone and they only have to report the lowest emission from any four of those so the other three could be very high.

He has developed a process where he can infuse subtle energy into like a sticker and we measure this subtle energy in a lot of different components. When you look at subtle energy and what is subtle energy, it is the energy that is really … that commands of the universe. When you see these pictures of a galaxy [00:32:00] and the galaxy is spinning, what makes the galaxy move? It’s subtle energy. The universe is made up of total subtle energy.

One little demonstration that I do all the time is, and it’s sitting on the corner of my desk, is a Tesla globe where you put your fingers on that and you get all these sparks that are going on in there. If I take a CFL light bulb and I hold it away from the globe where the energy is, that light bulb with light up. What causes that to light up? It is subtle energy and so we are part of that energy field. You and I are connected through quantum entanglement. We are part of each other and so it’s that. I’ve always wondered how when you watch a flock of birds or a school of fish and they’re all going along and now all of a sudden they change direction. How do they do that?

Is it the lead fish goes I’m turning left now and shoosh, off they go? No, it is the vibration in the field. Now let me add something to that and that is, how do we create our own reality because that’s all part of this? Again, in a lot of my lectures I talk about your thoughts. If you have a thought whether it’s a wanted thought or an unwanted thought, it doesn’t matter, the principle is the same. If you have a thought and you hold that thought for 17 seconds and that thought has a vibration energy to it, the law of attraction says that other energy that is like that will be attracted to it. Thoughts begin to come in. If I’m having a negative thought, an unwanted thought and I keep thinking about it, that’s … I’ll give you an illustration here in a second but if you hold that for 17 seconds, 17 more seconds, 17, you get to 68 [00:34:00] seconds. It now has amassed enough energy through a principle that’s called constructive interference that amassed enough energy that it can now affect particle matter. That is how we create our own reality.

Whatever your intention, whatever you’re putting out there, let’s say for example, I’m driving down the highway and I’m in this energy field of content and happiness and love and joy and feeling good and some knucklehead cuts me off. Now I’m vibrating angry energy and I’ve dropped down here. If I’m holding that energy for 68 seconds and I go back to the office and I’m telling the people here, this guy cut me off and I got so angry, he doesn’t even belong on the road.

Now I’ve held it for several hours and I go home and my wife’s fixing dinner and she says, could you go to the store and pick up a few items for me? It’s like, yeah, okay, it gives me more time to think about this knucklehead. I go to the store, get three items and I pick up the three items and go up to the register. Now I’ve been doing this, vibrating this for several hours and I get up to the cash register and there’s a guy in front of me in the express line that has 38 items. Coincidence, not hardly. That’s the energy that I have attracted to myself and I start attracting and we start living these patterns over and over again depending on what we think about if we just understand the principle, if I start changing my thought patterns I will change what happens to me.

You talk to people who maybe have an intention, they want more money and so they’re thinking consciously, I want more money, I want more money, I want more money. They’re putting that in the field and maybe they have a subconscious belief that says you don’t deserve more money. That’s what actually being broadcast in the field and their energy is not lined up so they’re not attracting [00:36:00] the things that they actually desire. Then there are those people who can line that up and it’s like wow, their life is magic, and it’s because they had learned how to manage this energy, not only physiologically in their body but through the thought processes and how to interact with the universal field. That makes sense to you?

Guy:                  It does. That’s like the scientific version of [crosstalk 00:36:24] … Go on, Stu.

Stu:                  If I was to sum that up, would it be we really should try and think happy thoughts?

Jeff:                  In a perfect world that would be great but that’s not what really happens. Seventy-five percent of our thoughts are negative. I don’t know if you knew that or not but …

Guy:                  We’ve got a question right here because I read somewhere that we have over 50,000 thoughts a day.

Jeff:                  Well, it’s actually higher than that. It’s more like 600,000. It’s more like what you have consciously aware of.

Guy:                  Wow, and then the majority are repetitive and negative.

Jeff:                  Yeah and they’re playing all the time and they’re in your subconscious so how do those get there? A belief is nothing more than a thought that you have over and over again. As you keep having those thoughts, that becomes ingrained or implanted in your subconscious and those are the things … If you want to know what’s on your subsconscious mind, look at your behavior. If it’s like, whoa, I have this behavior I don’t like. Well, that’s probably what your subconscious is about.

Now we have a device, I sent it to the other room, but it’s a headband that when you put it on, it has four electrodes, two in the front and then two behind your ears. All you have to do is think about something and it will let you know what your subconscious perception of that is and also what your emotions are, whether you have positive or [00:38:00] negative emotion.

We use this a lot with a program that we’re doing with Midwestern University Medical University and working with veterans that have PTSD and traumatic brain injury, also first responders and professional athletes that have injury. We can help them see what that is and you can literally use this to help train your brain.

Are you familiar with Mind Movies? Have you ever heard of Mind Movies?

Guy:                  I’ve heard of it.

Jeff:                  Natalie Ledwell is one of the founders of Mind Movies and it’s like vision boards on steroids. When we set somebody up with one of these, we also set them up with a subscription to the Mind Movies so you can have your own pictures, sayings, your own video and create a mind movie so that like when I meditate I will watch my mind movie before I go into meditation and then after I come out.

We’ve got some scientific brain maps of people one of the first times that we encountered this. We do like … some of the people we measured at Dr. Joe’s events, we’ll do pre and post so before the event begins and then we measure them again afterwards and look at the changes in their brain. We’re doing one of these pre and post readings with this gal and seeing the EEG going all over the place just like oh-oh, what’s wrong with that. It must be a bad electrode or what. I’m fiddling with stuff and then afterwards, I got her out in the outside of the room there and asked her, I said, “Tell me about what was happening there,” and she says, “Oh, I was just thinking about my mind movie.”

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She wasn’t actually watching it, she was thinking about it and it was so real to her she was having that [00:40:00] experience while we were mapping her brain. Now we have literally thousands of those where we have measured people going through that process and so there’s a great deal of power and energy in the brain that happens when you are focusing on this. If a person wants to begin to train their brain, that’s why we now have these tools.

Another one that we’re working on is this guy right here. It’s a 16-channel that will allow people to do brain mapping and brain training from their smartphone, their tablet, or their computer anywhere in the world.

Stu:                  If I wanted to do that at home and let’s just say I ordered a rogue kit off the internet, could I potentially do more harm than good?

Jeff:                  Yeah.

Stu:                  I’m sitting there and I’m putting this thing on and all of a sudden, I wet my pants, I don’t know why.

Jeff:                  Or you start quacking like a duck. That could be a little unnerving. Anything that you can train you can untrain and that’s what we call neuroplasticy in the brain. With the training that we teach the brain, I mean you can train yourself with bad habits. You know anybody that has bad habits? Yeah, we all know people. How did they get the bad habits? They train themselves. Can they train themselves out of a bad habit?

Yeah. I don’t know that you would get to the point of putting one of these on and wetting your pants. Here’s what happens when we’re working with that. We create what’s called a protocol or a set of instructions of what we want the brain to do. Maybe this is improving memory or improving your sleep or something like that. There’s a set of instructions that we create for the [00:42:00] brain.

When you put one of these devices on and then you select the brain training side of the application, it’s then going to go into a learning mode. You select learning mode. Imagine that there is cube in a tunnel and it’s suspended in space and what you want that cube to do is you want it to rotate counterclockwise. That’s the event that we want to have happen. You put it in learning mode and you’re thinking about rotate counterclockwise, rotate counterclockwise, and then you could set up neutral where it’s not doing anything.

Then you go into … It takes about eight seconds for your brain to learn that. It records the brain patterns of what you’re doing and then when you select the training mode and you start thinking about, I want that cube to rotate so you’re focusing on the cube and all of a sudden it will start to rotate counterclockwise and then you can control it, go neutral and it will stop.

Now I want it to rotate the other way or I want it to go in and out of the tunnel or I want it to disappear. You can create all of those conditions. We have the ability now to measure things in the brain and put them into a practical application. That’s where we are in the technological field of learning how to train our brains where you can begin to understand, what are some of the subconscious patterns that I’m feeding my brain? How can I train it to do higher and better things? How can I create a better reality for myself? How can I sleep better? How can … you know?

Going back to your question about nutrition, if you’re feeding your body really crappie stuff, guess what you’re going to get? A bunch of blockages and it’s going to cause the cells to react in a certain way. Eating healthy, having good [00:44:00] supplements, there is good food and then there is not so good food. You don’t want to live on a diet of, pardon the commercial here, you don’t want to live on a diet of Twinkies, probably not going to help you. You need a little more protein than just those carbs there or the sugar, so having that balanced nutrition is going to make a big difference.

Much of what we were thought about nutrition, when I was growing up the pyramid and the food groups and all of that, we didn’t know any better and so …

Stu:                  No, we didn’t. We like to use the power of our brain in this company at least and we turn that pyramid by just sheer thought upside down, so all the good stuff’s at the top and all the bad stuff’s at the bottom.

Just thinking about, if I’m at home right now, we’ve got our listeners out there and they just want to be, they want to be the best person of themselves or the best version of themselves should I say. I’ve listened to what you said about the subconscious mind and the ability that we can have to change these thoughts and try and become happier. What can I do at home? Almost like a hack or practical tools that I can apply perhaps everyday without having access to machinery, services and the like. Is there anything that I can do? You touched on meditation before.

Jeff:                  Meditation is one of the best things that you can do and there’s a lot of different ways to meditate out there. Some may get you a little further along. I think since we worked with thousands of advanced meditators over the last three years, we’re beginning to understand more about that. There’s a process called [00:46:00] mindfulness and there’s some book out there about mindfulness and if you can start to live present in the moment, that’s one of the best things that you can do. Also, be aware of your thoughts.

Am I getting caught up in these thought loops or can I break that pattern and say, no, I don’t want to be thinking about that because I know what the effect of that is going to have so I’m going to think more about … and let me give you some additional information here. We talked earlier about the negative thoughts and it’s important that people understand that the contrast in the world is very important, the yin and the yang kind of thing.

When we have negative thoughts, that’s really helping us because we understand what it is we don’t want which then allows us to put our emphasis or our focus on what we do want but you’ve got to have the contrast in order to do that. The contrast gives us focus and if people understand that basic principle then when you start having these thoughts about what you don’t want in your life then step back and say, okay, if that’s what I don’t want, then what is it I do want?  Oh, this is what I do want.

Then you start putting that energy into that and that’s what’s going to be begin to materialize in the world.

Stu:                  I understand.

Guy:                  The first thing is for you to be aware.

Jeff:                  You don’t need a gadget to do that.

Guy:                  Nearly every person I speak to though, Jeff, and if meditation comes up in the topic, nearly every person I speak to are pretty much having struggle with it.

Jeff:                  They don’t know how to meditate.

Guy:                  And to sit down for even, like you said, five minutes. What would your tip be for that? Even just to go this is what you need to do for five minutes a day to start, whatever.

Jeff:                  It’s like training a dog. You want the dog to sit and stay. In the very first part, you have to teach the dog to sit, right? Put your butt down on the [00:48:00] floor here and then it’s like stay and then you walk a little ways away. Sit, stay, and then after doing that again and again and again and again, the dog finally gets the idea of sit and stay.

Your brain is no different than that. You get into a meditation and you get all of this stuff going on and it’s like teaching your brain, sit, stay. No, we don’t do that. Quiet, quiet, and if you could only hold it for five seconds, great then the next time hold it for 10 seconds, 20 seconds, a minute and that’s how people build up their ability and at the same time trying to understand, okay, that business in my brain, all of that information that’s going on, I want that to be quiet.

Give your brain simple instructions, I would prefer when I’m in this meditation so you’re getting down and you’re actually cycling between theta and alpha. Theta is a very creative state, alpha is what we call sensorial rest where you are alert, that you are aware of what’s going on. We teach people how to cycle between theta and alpha. As they do that over and over and over again, new dendrites form, new pathways develop and that’s then what fires. People can do that at home if they’re willing to put in the work. Some people say I can’t do it. Yeah, you got decades of your brain running wild so wild dog, horse, wild brain, same thing.

Guy:                  Is there an optimum time to do it?

Jeff:                  I’m sorry?

Guy:                  Is there an optimum time to do it like get up first thing in the morning or it doesn’t matter what time if you want to just …

Jeff:                  It doesn’t matter. You do it multiple times a day, the morning … I prefer to do mine in the morning because I’m better. When I get 9, [00:50:00] 10:00 at night, I’m like a NiCad battery, I just kind of and I’d sleep. Yeah, I’m done. I usually will get up 3:34 in the morning and meditate for two hours. I never could do that before.

My brain, talking about all this beta in the back of the brain, my brain was like that. I didn’t even know what quiet was until I trained that out of my brain and now I have the ability to be quiet for long periods of time and be able to experience the value of connecting with the universe to find out what I want to find out.

Stu:                  You mentioned, you touched before on supplementation to help your brain state. Would you recommend any particular supplementation?

Jeff:                  There’s the two key factors that will help, are melatonin and serotonin. You take a little bit of melatonin at night, that can help and the one thing that I think messes people up when they’re dealing with that is they think more is better. It’s like, well, I’m not getting the effect I want. Three milligrams is about the max you want to take, less is better.

If you’re still awake after 30 minutes, you’re not getting drowsy, then take a little bit less, take half of that and that will help. Serotonin should be taken in the day, that’s what’s going to help you perform better as you go along. You want antioxidants, fish oil and stuff like that. Paying attention to what your body needs. Now some people really should go to their physician and have their blood drawn and look, see if they have any deficiency in zinc or some of the minerals because this is about bringing [00:52:00] your body and your nutrition into alignment so that that’s the way you live everyday and staying in balances.

This is all about staying in balance about not only the energy in your body but help the cells of your body by eating right and exercising. It doesn’t take a lot.

Stu:                  That’s right. If you’re talking about drawing blood as well and looking for deficiencies, it might be worthy to run a hormone panel on your blood as well because your hormones are going to participate.

Jeff:                  Absolutely. You can have all kinds of things that are out of balance and so if people recognize, the key here is to get both my body, my brain aligned with energy so that I can interact with the energy field around me. Everybody has the ability for intuition and that’s one of the things we see in the brain mapping, people who are highly intuitive because they do exactly that. They care about their nutrition, they care about the bodies, they do what they need to do to sleep well, to meditate, to stay in balance, they know when they’re out of balance, what to do to get back in balance, how to get grounded, there’s all of those kinds of things.

Stu:                  Got it. To you what strategies do you personally implement yourself to stay on top of brain health?

Jeff:                  I eat a lot of Twinkies and chocolate.

Stu:                  Perfect, we’ll stop there.

Jeff:                  No. Actually, I listen to my body and it will tell me what it is that I need and so a lot of it is just some education, basic education, of nutrition and things like that. Now I’m getting older, I just turned 65 [00:54:00] this year and so testosterone tends to be an element. I take a supplement that I get at Costco that deals with testosterone supplementation so I’m not dragging myself around all day feeling tired and lethargic. That really helps and it also has a lot of the B vitamins, B6, B12, be healthy. That’s in there as well.

Those kinds of things are really helpful and at different stages of life you might need different things or different conditions depending on how far out of balance you are. I’m not on any kind of medication. The only thing I take are these supplements and they work well for me. Other supplements people might need but it’s about being aware. If you’re not aware of those things, go to a naturopath and have them give you some instruction on it.

Stu:                  Excellent.

Guy:                  Do you ever get stressed these days, Jeff?

Jeff:                  Everybody gets stressed and it’s not a question of whether you’re going to get stressed or not. It’s a question of what do you do about it when it does happen. What happens in your brain is when you get into a stressful mode, your brain starts to produce more cortisol and then your memory, you think your memory is going and stuff like that and it’s all … Again, it’s when I experience stress it’s usually because I’m not grounded so I know the process I need to do and I can do it within a matter of three or four minutes, go through this process, get grounded and then I can get back.

Some people don’t believe in this but I do because I experience it quite a lot with people that I work with that there are what I call energy vampires out there. If my energy is [00:56:00] up here and the vibration of that energy is love, contentment, joy, bliss, all of that and that’s where I live in that range, there are people who come in that are down here in the worry, anger, fear stuff, and they like to draw off that energy of people who are in that higher energy level.

Guy:                  They complain all the time.

Jeff:                  Yeah. If you’re around that for a while you feel depleted or that person leaves you and you go, wow, they just sucked the life right out of me. Well, yeah, exactly. You have to know how to get one that’s beginning to happen to you, how to get grounded, how to pull the energy in, how to coalesce the energy, not only from outside of us in the field but pull it up through the body and you can do that in a matter of a few minutes and you’re right back on and you’re charged.

Stu:                  We’ve spoken a lot about nutrition and strategies to improve the mindset, what about exercise? Because I have heard that exercise can be perhaps one of the greatest strategies when tackling depression for instance.

Jeff:                  Yeah. When you do that … Talking specifically about depression, very often in the front of the brain we’ll see a lot of alpha and that’s what we call familial depression. When you’re walking and that causes the endorphins to kick in, and up here in the left front part of the brain, that’s where our pleasure centers are so, even just walking, exercising, walking in a treadmill, whatever it is, it will get endorphins to fire and you’ll start to feel good.

Stu:                  Right, so really, get moving.

Jeff:                  Yeah. Get moving, get out there, get … It affects, the muscles get stronger, you’re able to … That is [00:58:00] very, very important. Again, we’re talking about balance. You can over exercise. For me to go out and train like some of the professional athletes that we work with, that’s not a good idea for me. For them, that works great because their body is in a fine tuned mechanism and just the littlest changes in their exercise can have big consequences in their performance, in their ability.

For me, if I don’t do anything, well, I’m just asking for trouble because the energy is not going to get regulated. I’m not going to get that flow of energy in my body and so it’s knowing really what exercise is going to do good for you and what you’re going to be good at. What you enjoy. I love to play racquetball. I don’t do much of that anymore just because I don’t have time. It’s not because I don’t love it but I’m very busy in the things that we do but I can get out and walk and so I do that.

Stu:                  Perfect. Excellent.

Guy:                  Yeah. Wow. I guess the take home message for today’s podcast is listening to your inner self, isn’t it and creating balance within the body to have the harmony and not be influenced by external factors.

Stu:                  Start small as well. Many of us have, we got busy lives, we got busy minds as a consequence of that but if, like you said, we can just take perhaps just five minutes out of our day just to try and quiet down the monkey in the mind. Spend a little bit of time working ourselves.

Guy:                  I like the dog analogy, that’s great.

Jeff:                  Yea and a lot of it is get some education. Find out what this is. If you want to know how to do that, start with mindfulness. Watch some of the videos that are out there and get some books, there are plenty of them, to know how to be present in the moment when you’re washing dishes or when you’re [01:00:00] at work, whatever it is that you’re doing. That will make a huge difference in helping train your mind day after day.

It’s like you can’t go do one pushup and say, okay, well, I’m fit now, I don’t have to do that again. It’s got to become a lifestyle. It’s going to be how much do you want to be in balance or do you like letting your brain run you instead of you running your brain. You create the reality that you want, so if you don’t like your life, then my advice is look at what you’re doing and how you’re doing it because you’re the one that’s creating it.

The only person that’s responsible for the life that you don’t like is you.

Guy:                  Yeah. That would be hard to hear for a lot of people, I reckon.

Jeff:                  It is. It was hard for me to learn that concept and then say, whoa, I’m the one responsible for that. No way. Those people think that life is happening to them rather than them creating it. We are creators. We are here to create, to learn how to create and when you begin to understand all of the universal laws and components that go along with that that we’ve talked about in this podcast, then you start to change your reality and life starts to get better, things start showing up.

I love to play this game with the universe when I go out somewhere and if my energy is aligned, I want that parking space so just as I’m puling in, somebody is pulling out or the space closes the door is empty. You probably all had that kind of experience. What if you could do that with intention? What if you could do that all the time? What if you could create all of the things that you want to attract whether it’s the love of your life or you want to attract more things? This is about learning how to command the laws of the universe. If [01:02:00] that’s what you want to do then that’s why you’re here.

Guy:                  Fantastic. I love the parking spot too. I often try that and it does work.

Stu:                  You’ve got a motor bike, Guy. It’s easier for you. You might think that you’re commanding this parking spot but there are just more little spots that bikes can slip into.

Guy:                  Rock star parking.

Stu:                  You’re cheating yourself.

Guy:                  I’m fully aware of the time, Jeff. We’re coming to the end of the show but we ask a question with every guest and that is, what’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Jeff:                  The best piece of advice that I was ever given was I’ve had a mindset, a thought of the way that I was raised and the way a lot of people are raised is, you got to do more. I would take my boat down to the stream, not literally, this is figuratively, and put it in there and start paddling up stream, thinking harder and faster was the way to get where I wanted to go when really the best advice that I got was just stop paddling. Go with the flow.

I don’t have to turn my boat around. It will turn itself around and then I start going with the flow of the energy and that was the best advice that I ever received and really started me thinking about how I’m living my life.

Guy:                  Fantastic.

Stu:                  I like it, makes sense. Go with the flow.

Jeff:                  Go with the flow.

Guy:                  Yeah. Struggle is not there. If anyone is listening to this and they want to find out more about what you do, Jeff, where would be the best place to go?

Jeff:                  Website, we have a lot of information there, thoughtgenius.com. That’s a good place. I have a book coming out real soon. Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Hostage. You can go to the Voice America channel. I’m on the empowerment channel on voiceamerica.com and my radio show is the same name. There’s a bunch of this kind of information shows [01:04:00] out there, it’s free. All you have to do is log on there. You could get an app from the app store for Voice America and listen.

They have a bunch of channels on wellness and health and finance and I just happen to be on the empowerment channel with Help! My Thoughts Are Holding Me Hostage.

Guy:                  Fantastic. We’re linked to all the show notes anyway when we put this up in the new year. Awesome. Thank you so much for your time today. That was absolutely fascinating. I’m definitely going to relisten to this and take that information again.

Jeff:                  Thanks for having me on. You guys are awesome. I really appreciate it.

Stu:                  No problems. I really appreciate your time and hopefully, we’ll connect with you in the future.

Jeff:                  Absolutely. I’m happy to do this anytime with you guys, you’re fun.

Guy:                  Thanks, Jeff. Cheers.

Stu:                  Thank you very much.

Jeff:                  Bye-bye.

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Eating Organic & Fresh Food On A Budget; How To Make The Right Choices

eating organic on a budget

Guy: Bare with me here… If someone was eating a quick and easy microwave meal for lunch and one day decided to replace that with a non-organic beef salad instead, I think it would be fair to say that’s a step in the right direction… right? What about those that eat the non-organic beef salad on a regular basis and then decide to have an organic version… the right step? Of course!

But what about the family with five kids to feed, or the parent that just lost his job and needs to tighten the financial reigns… then what? Personally I think you have to make the most of what you’ve got and work towards constant improvement over time. Everyone’s circumstances are different and you have to adjust accordingly. That doesn’t mean excuses, it just means being practical and looking for the best ways to make the most of your circumstances. So if you want to find out cost effective ways and strategies of how and what organic foods to shop for, then read on, as this is a fantastic post by naturopath Lynda Griparic on being street smart with your organic food. Over to Lynda…

Lynda: Do I need to eat organic is a question that I get asked very often. In fact it is one that I have asked myself from time to time as well.

Let’s start with what “Organic farming” actually means. Put simply it is a label given to food that is produced without synthetic chemicals such as fertilizers, pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, modified organisms, nanomaterials and human sewage sludge.

The benefits to eating organic foods are less exposure to these harmful pesticides and other disruptive chemicals. An interesting fact is that on average organic foods are 180 times lower in pesticides than the conventional types. Eating organic also ensures that we are not getting any genetically modified ingredients.

Plants and animals are exposed to many chemicals such as antibiotics, hormones and pesticides to accelerate crop production, boost quantity and weight and ward off nasty agricultural pests and bacteria. Animals are often fed antibiotics and hormones (estrogen and testosterone) to accelerate their weight and growth. As you can imagine if they are lethal and toxic enough to kill pests and interfere with natural growth rate then they could only be causing harm in the body of a human.

Humans accumulate toxins as do animals predominantly in fat (Adipose tissue), where they remain and disrupt many bodily systems such as the nervous system, digestive system, immune system and reproductive system.

The following list is not conclusive but will give you a taste of how these toxins can affect the body and mind:

  • Hormonal imbalance; early puberty, ovarian cysts, breast enlargement
  • Shorter pregnancies
  • Behavioural and developmental disorders
  • Poor brain function: Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, memory, concentration
  • Leaky gut and the digestive consequences that arise from this

In a perfect world consuming everything organic would be ideal, but is it really realistic on a cost front?

For most, probably not. At times during our lives certain situations may cause you to re-evaluate your spending, such as a change in working environment, pregnancy, a new addition to the family, athletic competition, retirement or illness.

The good news is that while there are certain foods I would not consume unless organic, there are many conventionally grown foods typically lower in harmful chemicals. If unable to go completely organic, go conventional with these foods. Eating well does not need to send you into debt. It really is possible and well worth the effort and attention when choosing food.

Foods I ALWAYS Have Organic

Animal products:

  • meat
  • poultry
  • dairy (cheese, milk)
  • eggs

The pesticides, antibiotics, hormones and other chemicals that these animals are exposed to accumulate in their tissues, for the most part in their fat. If they eat it, so do we.

Fruits & Vegetables

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a US health and environmental research organisation has put together a couple of lists called The Clean 15 and Dirty Dozen. They are useful guidelines that can actually reduce your exposure to pesticides by almost 90 percent. Although these are lists based on farming in the USA, the non-organic practices in Australia are similar so for the most part this content is a good “guideline”.

The Dirty Dozen Fruits & Vegetables List:

  • blueberries
  • apples *
  • peaches *
  • nectarines *
  • strawberries*
  • grapes *
  • celery *
  • spinach
  • cucumbers *
  • potatoes
  • capsicum
  • lettuce *
  • kale (newly added)
  • carrots *
  • broccoli *
  • pears *
  • zucchini * (newly added)

* added to the list because they relate to Australia in particular.

In general fruits that have a thin, delicate, skin are extremely unprotected and are exposed to a medley of chemicals used in farming. Peaches, apples, grapes, blueberries and nectarines are an example and are considered one of the most “dirty” fruits if non-organic.

Unfortunately even scrubbing the skins of fruits such as apples does not remove all of the chemical residue and peeling the skins off removes valuable nutrients found in the skin. It is a similar story with vegetables. Vegetables such as celery, spinach, kale and capsicum either have thin or no protective skins which make them more vulnerable to the effects of toxic chemicals.

A sad side note about grapes. Their thin skins do not protect them from chemicals and sadly this extends to wine as well. Studies have shown that up to 34 different pesticides can be found in wine. Sigh!

The Clean Fifteen Fruits & Vegetables List:

  • avocados
  • sweet corn
  • pineapples
  • cabbage
  • peas (frozen)
  • onions
  • asparagus
  • mangoes
  • papayas
  • kiwis
  • eggplant
  • grapefruit
  • rockmelon
  • cauliflower
  • sweet potatoes

EWG-Dirty-Dozen-Clean-15-list

Fruits and vegetables on the Clean 15 list need minimal exposure to chemicals in order to thrive. Low concentrations of pesticide residues have been found on these vegetables.

How can you reduce exposure to pesticides and chemicals found in food?

  • Ensure that you consume purified water.
  • Grow your own vegetables using organic methods.
  • Help your body detoxify well and remove chemicals by nourishing your gut flora. Click Here to find out how.
  • Move your bowels every day to help remove inflammatory toxins.
  • Buy organic or chemical free foods from your local farmers markets. They are often cheaper and if you purchase at the end of the day you may be able to snag a better price.
  • Wash fruit and vegetables thoroughly using a fruit/veg wash. I use EnviroClean by EnviroCare.
  • Peel non-organic vegetables and fruit or remove the outer leaf layers.
  • Trim visible fat from non organic meats as most of the toxins live in fat.
  • Enjoy some meat free days.

If you are time poor, buy fresh, local, organic or chemical free produce online from ethical companies.

The online food produce company I personally use and highly recommend to patients is Ooooby. Ooooby is an acronym for Out of Our Own BackYards. Oooby finds local, seasonal, organic or chemical free foods and deliver it straight to your door. Aside from being highly affordable I appreciate knowing how much I spend on groceries weekly which helps me budget well.

I simply love their ethics as they ensure all of those involved in the supply of the fresh produce are fairly rewarded and that farmers get 50% of the total retail value. There is also a note in your box highlighting where the food has come from (location and grower), allowing a deeper connection and appreciation between consumer and farmer. It truly makes me feel great to support local businesses. It is win-win really as my loved ones and I benefit by eating well and it frees up valuable time that I can spend doing the things I love.
As you can see there is a lot to consider when prioritising what foods should be organic. I have not even touched on fish; farmed, genetically engineered versus wild and sustainable. This topic is big enough to be it’s own blog post.

Conclusion

My parting words to you are, rather than let this information generate fear within you, let it empower you to make better choices for your health and remember that humans do not live in a sterile bubble. We like to socialize from time to time where we may not have control over what is dished up for us. However if you do your best where you can, your body and mind can allow for a few sneaky toxic culprits and will be in better condition to deal with any harmful side effects should they occur.

Lynda Griparic NaturopathLynda is a fully qualified Naturopath and Nutritionist with over 13 years of experience in the health industry.

Lynda specialises in detoxification and weight loss. She has extensive experience in running healthy, effective and sustainable weight loss programs and has expertise in investigating and treating the underlying causes of weight gain and metabolic problems.

If you would like to book a consultation with Lynda, CLICK HERE

fuel your body with powerful, natural and nourishing foods – click here –

Probably The Best Description Of Inflammation You’ll Ever Hear



The above video is 3:03 minutes long.

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Dr John HartThe word inflammation gets thrown around all the time. From bloggers, health nuts, athletes and practitioners; they all say eat this or do that to reduce inflammation! But do you really understand what inflammation is, and more importantly, what low-grade inflammations is?

Well have no fear if you don’t, because if you are willing to commit three minutes of your time to the above video, you will hear probably the best description of inflammation and why you REALLY need to know about it.

This week our special guest is Dr John Hart who is a longevity medicine practitioner. This is probably the most important podcast we’ve done to date and we highly recommend you check it out, as he explains the simple things you can do to avoid chronic illness, live longer, healthier, happier and improve the quality of your life.

Full Interview: Mastering Hormones, Gut Health, Inflammation & Living to 120 Years Old


Audio Version of the Full Interview Here:


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In this episode we talk about:

  • How to add healthy and happy years onto your life by making simple changes
  • The best description of inflammation you’ll ever hear
  • The best description of leaky gut you’ll ever hear
  • Why hormones are crucial to our health, vibrance & labido!
  • Applying the ‘Big 5′ to avoid the pitfalls of chronic disease as we age
  • And much much more…

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Full Transcript Interview:

Guy Lawrence: Hi, this is Guy Lawrence of 180 Nutrition and welcome to another episode of the Health Sessions. You know, I might be a little bit biased, but it never ceases to amaze me when we have guests on and some of the information that they impart with us and today’s guest is absolutely no exception about this.

I might have repeated it before, but the more I learn I realize the more I don’t actually know. Because every time I seem to explore these rabbit holes, when it comes to health and wellness and life and nutrition and you name it, the more things are just getting revealed to me.

If you’re watching this podcast in video, you probably notice my jaw is opened for half of it, because the information I just shared on you is just absolutely, I find it absolutely fascinating and it’s fantastic to be bringing the podcast to you today.

Our fantastic guest is Dr. John Hart. Now, he’s a fantastic and beautiful human being and he’s a longevity medicine practitioner and we delve into essentially the human body and the life of the human body and how we can extend it and live actually a happier, healthier life going into our 40s, 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and even beyond that. Which is awesome!

He talks about two specific things, which is: life span of the human being, but also then the health span of the human being. And the idea is to expand the health span so the quality of your life continues as you get older as well and then that has a knock-on effect, because it obviously affects your life span. And doing this as well, I probably heard the best description of leaky gut I’ve ever heard as well and the importance of it.

So, we dive into so many things and it’s definitely going to be a podcast I’m going to play to myself a couple of times to re-get this information. So, I have no doubt that you’re going to get a lot out of this today.

We also get emails, you know. Sometimes this information is overload, where’s the best place to start? How do we do it? And I find myself repeating these things, so I thought I’d print a podcast.

If you’re new to 180 Nutrition, download the e-book. It’ll probably take you 30 minutes to read. It’s 26 pages. It’s written in a nice simple manner, outlining what we feel to be the best principles for health, to apply for long-term health. Simple as that!

Our 180 Superfood, you know, it’s completely natural. If you want to start cutting out processed foods from your diet, which is what we always encourage and recommend, all you have to do is get some 180 Superfood.

I have it in a smoothie every morning. So, I’ll mix it with some fats, like avocado. I normally put a greens power in if I don’t have any spinach and things like that and I usually us a low glycemic fruit as well. Berries, quarter of a banana sometimes, things like that. And then you’re getting nutrients, you know. You’re not getting just glucose, which is from processed carby foods that most people do. You’re getting the nutrients from all that.

And the last thing as well is, yeah, you can sign up to our newsletter and we send out articles every week. They’re all free. You can read them. All have different thoughts and discussions.

So, yeah, do them things and you’ll be well on your way. Just slowly taking this information in all the time. It’s just as simple as that.

And of course, if you’re listening to this through iTunes, leave a little review, give use your feedback on the podcast. It’s always really appreciated. Subscribe to it. Five-star it, And that just literally helps us with iTunes rankings and continues to get the word out there.

So, let’s go over to John Hart. This is an awesome podcast and I have no doubt that you’re going to enjoy it.

Guy Lawrence: Okay. Hi, this is Guy Lawrence. I’m joined with Stuart Cooke. Hi, Stewie.

Stuart Cooke: Hello.

Guy Lawrence: Well, a little freeze there. He’s back. Our special guest today is Dr. John Hart. John, welcome to the show. Thanks for coming on, mate. We really appreciate it.

Dr. John Hart: Thanks, Guy. Thanks for inviting me.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, with just; what I thought I’d do is just fill in with the listeners a little bit about the background of it all, because we met at the THR1VE symposium, which is probably just over a month ago now and of course, we were all speaking there, with Mark Sisson being brought over, and we came in onto your talk and was just absolutely blown away with what you had to say and you could clearly see everyone else in the room was too. So, we’ve been trying to figure out how we can get that into our podcast somehow. So, we’ll have a good go anyway. I don’t know whether we’ll achieve it, but we’ve certainly got a few questions about to run through with you today, John. So, it’s much appreciated, mate.

So, just to get the ball rolling would you mine sharing a little bit about yourself? What you do and I guess a little bit about your own journey, like you did.

Dr. John Hart: Well, I’ve always had an interest in health and performance and I started off playing sports at a reasonably high level; volleyball and biking and rowing and then went to Uni and got into the Uni lifestyle and did a few degrees and ended up with an interest in sports medicine, sports science and medicine. And since then been training up on all the different aspects of human performance and human health.

So, you get trained in disease and disease management medicine and that’s okay. I mean, modern medicine is very good at treating life-threatening diseases and acute injuries and infections. And they’re the things that used to kill us was acute injury and infections, but nowadays it’s more chronic diseases. Long-term, low-grade inflammation causing damage to tissues that lead to the 70 to 80 percent of causes of death, with chronic degenerative diseases, like heart attacks and stokes and cancer and dementia and osteoporosis.

And modern medicine is not that good at that. If I have a serious infection, or I have a broken bone, you know I’ll be going straight to the nearest hospital, but if I want to stay healthy and detect early disease and turn it around, rather than waiting until it gets into the severe, sort of permanent damage, then I think you’ve got to go looking at more functional medicine or integrative medicine techniques to be effective.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: Okay. So, just a little outside of medicine right now and, you know, million dollar question on everyone’s lips; in your opinion, how significant is nutrition for overall health?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah, I think, I talk about the Big Five. If you want to have a long healthy life you’ve got to have five things that are working optimally …

Stuart Cooke: Okay.

Dr. John Hart: … and that’s diet, exercise, sleep, stress management, and hormones, probably in that order. I think diet is the most important one. If your diet’s bad, if it’s really bad, you’re not going to be able to counteract that one by getting all the other ones working. But for optimal health, you’ve got to have them all working. Because each one that’s broken is going to lead to degeneration and disease.

So, nutrition, whether that’s diet and/or dietary supplements, I’d put that as the most important one. But you’ve got to put attention on all of them. It’s like, you’ve got a car and you only put attention on the engine. You don’t worry about tires or the steering or the air conditioning or whatever or the hole in the roof. You’ve got to do everything if you want it to run well.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, and from what we can see, most people aren’t running all five. There’s normally something amiss.

Dr. John Hart: You say most people, all five are not optimal, they’re all broken to a degree and just about everybody’s got sleep that is broken.

When you’re young, your hormones usually take care of themselves. Because in your 20s, Mother Nature wants you operating well so that you can reproduce and raise the next generation. But once you get into your 30s and you’ve done that, Mother Nature doesn’t really need to have you around any more, so it’s quite happy to generate decline and die off. And part of the way it does that is to decrease the production of most of the hormones that control what the body does.

So, the hormones don’t actually do anything. They just tell the body what to do. If you don’t make the hormones, then the body doesn’t get told what to do. It doesn’t do it and you degenerate, you age, you die off and stop off at the nursing home maybe for 10 years on the way.

So, when you’re young, you don’t have to worry about the hormones because it’s in Mother Nature’s interest to have them all working optimally.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: Most people that’s what happens, not everybody, but most people. But certainly as you get older, most hormones decline and then you’ve got to put more attention on it.

So, the way I think about it is, that when you’re young there’s a lot of things that happen automatically and you don’t have to worry about it too much and you’ve got a big reserve.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: The older you get, the less happens automatically, the more you have to take it out of manual control, if you want to maintain your health. You don’t have to, but if you don’t, you will degenerate and you’ll suffer the disability and the pain and the discomfort and the limitations of what you can do because of that.

Guy Lawrence: Right. And does that slow up the aging process then, by intervening and then the aging …

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. You can think about it as normal aging or optimal aging. Normal aging is the stage of decline that Mother Nature’s in favor of us going through to kill us off. But we’ve got the technology and the knowledge now to intervene in that and have optimal aging, where basically you stay healthy and active and independent and vital for much, much longer and instead of having a long period, say a third of your life in sort of fairly serious decline and decay and disability, you know you can shorten that done to a few years.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Wow. I certainly like the idea of optimal …

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. There’s life span and there’s health span. And so, life span is how long you live, but health span is how long you’re healthy.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: Quality of life.

Dr. John Hart: Yes, that’s right. So, we’ve sort of extended our life span, but we haven’t really extended our health span yet with modern medicine. You know, it has to a degree, but not as much as the life span. So, there seems to be more of a gap now between the limit of your health span and the limit of your life span.

So, anti-aging medicine, age management medicine, longevity medicine, whatever you want to call it, it’s all about identifying why your health span’s declining and correcting it. So, maintain your health span.

And it turns out that the things improve your health span, also improve your life span.

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: The health span’s the criteria , because there’s no point in living longer if it’s in a nursing home.

Stuart Cooke: Exactly.

Guy Lawrence: If you’ve been dragged over the line, yeah. Absolutely.

Stuart Cooke: And does the strategies, regarding the things that you’ve spoken about, include gut health? Because we’ve been hearing a lot about the critical importance of microbiome right now. It seems to be a bit of a buzzword. Is there; what do you think about that?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. I think just sort of the big picture is that the things that cause degen; the main thing that causes degeneration and deterioration and aging of the body is inflammation. And the single major source of inflammation is an unhealthy gut in most people. So, by correcting the gut, then you can minimize the inflammation in your body, which then decreases the degeneration and the decay in your body.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: So, I’ll just talk a bit about inflammation, because everybody has heard about the word, but don’t have a picture of what it means.

So, we have the ability to mount an acute inflammatory response, in a local part of the body, in response to the things that used to kill us. The things that used to kill us were infections and trauma.

So, it you get a local infection or you get trauma in a part of your body, you will set up an acute inflammatory response to deal with it. And what happens is your blood vessels dilate, so more blood goes to the area and that’s why it looks redder and feels warmer. And when the blood vessels get leaky, so cells that have transported into that area can get out of the blood vessels and at the same time fluid leaks out with it, so the area swells up and those cells then go around and they eat the infectious agent, whether it’s a bacteria or fungus or parasite or whatever or they eat the damaged tissue. Now the cells come in and repair the damage. And then once it’s all fixed, it all goes away.

So, that redness, swelling, heat, pain is fixing the problem, hopefully and then once the problem’s fixed it all just settles down. So, that’s an acute local inflammatory response, a really good idea to do with infections and traumas that used to kill us.

But nowadays we’ve controlled infections. You know we know about food preparation and food storage and waste removal and antibodies and vaccinations, so infections are not big killers any more. And we’ve got our environment pretty well controlled.

We don’t have dinosaurs and tigers and people with clubs and spears. We’ve got occupational health and safety, so traumas not a big killer any more.

Now, 70 to 80 percent of people die to chronic degenerative diseases, which is diseases that are caused by this inflammatory process being turned on a little bit by the whole body, for decades.

Stuart Cooke: Right.

Dr. John Hart: So, the chronic degenerative diseases are caused by chronic low grade inflammation and that’s caused by a whole lot of things triggering off a little bit of this inflammatory process. And so, if you want to have a long healthy life, you want to have low levels of inflammation.

We’re all way more inflamed than we were a thousand years, when we were running around the jungle, touching the ground, out in the sun. Pulling the fruits right off the tree in season. Drinking fresh water. Physically active. Relatively low stress. Sleeping from nine to twelve hours in the back of the cave. Now, that’s what the body expects.

But the current lifestyle is totally different. We’ve got the same body, but we’ve got a totally different environment that we’re asking it to live in, and it’s not getting what it needs. And all these things that it’s being exposed to or things that it’s not being exposed to that it expects are triggering off this inflammation in the body that causes damage.

Guy Lawrence: Got it. What you’re saying then is if your gut is not operating correctly, you’re constantly going to create low-grade inflammation.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. So, if you’ve got what is called a “leaky gut” or increased intestinal permeability, that’s basically a source of toxicity or infection into the body. So, maybe we talk a bit about the gut just quickly.

Guy Lawrence: Sure.

Dr. John Hart: The thing about the gut, it’s a tube that runs through the center of your body. It’s open at both ends and what’s inside that tube is not yet inside your body. It’s in a tube that’s passing through your body. So, inside that tube there are billions of bacteria. Up to ten times more bacteria in your gut than there are cells in your body.

So, it’s a whole little environment there, a whole new microenvironment in that tube. And if you’ve got the right bugs and they’re happy, as in well looked after, well-fed; then they act as an organ of your body. Now, they’re regarded now that two to three kilograms of slushy poo is regarded as an organ of your body, because it supports the health of your whole body. Just like your heart and your lungs and your brains.

Stuart Cooke: Right.

Dr. John Hart: If you’ve got the right bugs, they make vitamins for you. They help you digest your food. They pull minerals off your food. They stimulate your immune system appropriately. They ferment your food into things called short-chain fatty acids. And short-chain fatty acids are important, because they’re the preferred fuel for the lining of the gut. And the lining of the gut has to be healthy, because it has to function as a semi-permeable membrane. It has to be able to pump through vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fats, etc. from digestion. But it has to keep out of the body, in the tube, the bugs, the waste products of the bugs, the dead bugs, the parts of the dead bugs, and the big undigested food particles.

And if the lining of the gut is healthy, then that will all happen and everything’s fine. The stuff that’s in the gut stays in the gut, and the live body gets the nutrition that it needs.

But if the lining of the gut is irritated or inflamed, then you get a thing called increased intestinal permeability or leaky gut.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: That then lets; so, the lining of the gut then doesn’t work properly. So, it doesn’t pump through the vitamins, minerals, amino acids as well as it should and it starts letting through stuff that it shouldn’t. The toxins and poisons and parts of bugs and non-digested food particles in your gut, into your body.

And your body’s immune system is designed to be constantly surveilling your gut,
your body, for what is not you. Your body’s immune system should be able to find bacteria, infections, viruses and kill them before they can take over and kill you, but to leave you alone.

So, your immune system’s job is to survive foreign invaders. Now, the most likely source of foreign invaders, in the normal body, is from the gut, because that’s where the mass majority of them are.

So, 80 to 90 percent of the immune system is in the wall of the gut, constantly surveilling the gut, secreting antibodies into it, trying to control what goes on in there. And anything that can get through the wall of the gut, your immune system checks it out and says, “I recognize you, you can pass, you’re a vitamin, you’re a mineral, whatever.” Or “I don’t recognize you, you must be a toxin, you must be some foreign invader. You’re not suppose to be here.” and it attacks it and destroys it.

Guy Lawrence: And out you go.

Stuart Cooke: Are there any particular culprits that spring to mind, that really do affect the health of our gut?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. The two main sort of categories of things that irritate the lining of the gut, to cause leaky gut, are foods and the wrong bugs.

So, if you’ve got foods; there are foods that everybody is sensitive to some degree and there are foods that individuals have their own particular sensitivity.

Stuart Cooke: Hmm.

Dr. John Hart: You kill off the good ones with courses of antibiotics or antibiotics in your meat or chemicals like insecticides, pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, colorings, flavorings, preservatives, sweeteners, heavy metals; they’re all going to make those bugs either kill them off or sick and angry and then they’re going to react accordingly.

So, if the bugs are not happy with where they are, they’re going to try and leave. And so, the only way out is through the wall of the gut. So, they’re going to get angry. They’re going to get irritated. They’re going to start releasing inflammatory mediators and attack the wall of the gut to try to get out of where they are now, because they’re not happy where they are. It’s not comfortable.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: So, everything you eat, you’re not just feeding you, you’re feed them. So, here’s a little snip; fact that will blow your mind. If you look at all the cells on and in you have nucleuses and in the nucleuses; in the nucleus of each cell is the DNA and the DNA controls what that cell does, whether it’s a bacteria cell, or a human cell.

If you look at all the DNA that’s on and in you, only two percent of it is yours. The rest of it is the bacteria, the viruses, the parasites that live on and in you; us.

Stuart Cooke: Wow!

Dr. John Hart: And that’s normal, as long as they’re the good guys.

Guy Lawrence: Wow!

Dr. John Hart: So, if you think about it from their point of view, they’re actually running the show. We’re just the apartment block; the host and they’re the tenants. We’re just the landlord.

So, as with any landlord-tenant relationship, the landlord has to make sure the tenant’s happy; otherwise, the tenant’s going to trash the place. If the tenant’s happy, he’ll look after the place. If he’s unhappy he’s not going to look after it. And that’s exactly what happens between us and the bugs or the microbiome in our gut.

And it’s the same relationship that we are just coming to understand about the external environment. If we trash the external environment there’s going to be kickback to our health. We can’t pollute the planet and expect to have; be healthy ourselves.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: We can’t pollute our internal environment and expect to be healthy ourselves.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: Wow.

Guy Lawrence: And in your view, John, of what you’ve seen, is leaky gut common? Like, do you think a lot of people; it’s a big problem out there with people?

Dr. John Hart: I think that people who just do what is the standard Australian diet, the SAD diet, and standard Australian lifestyle, will all have leaky gut to some degree. Yeah.

Guy Lawrence: Okay.

Dr. John Hart: And you can tell if you have any gut symptoms; nausea, burping, bloating, farting, episodes of constipation or diarrhoea, cramps, reflux; that’s all the gut is not working properly. And if you have any tenderness in your gut when you push on it, that’s an inflamed gut.

If you have any of those symptoms, you’re guaranteed to have some degree of leaky gut. And therefore affects on the rest of your body from the stuff that’s leaking through your gut, because that gut-blood barrier, you know, that is damaged to cause leaky gut. There’s similar barriers between the blood and the blood vessel wall so, you can get leaky gut. You can also get leaky blood vessels. So, you leak crap into the blood vessel wall and that’s going to end up with blood vessel disease, which is the commonest killer.

If you put all the blood vessel diseases together, that’s by far the commonest killer in our society; is damaged lining or the endothelium of the inside edge of the blood vessels. And there’s another barrier between the blood and the brain, the blood brain barrier.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: All the things that damage one, will damage the other. So, the blood-brain barrier is there to control what gets into the brain. The body’s very fussy about what get into the brain. But if you’ve got a leaky gut and that’s leaking poisons into the body, and those poisons are floating around in the blood, you’re going to be damaging your blood vessels all the way through and then they’re going to be causing a leaky brain and stuff’s going to start getting to your brain that shouldn’t get there and you get brain dysfunction and brain cell death.

Guy Lawrence: That’s incredible. So, a couple of things that just spring into mind, sorry Stu, before we move on is that, then a leaky gut should be one of the first things anyone should address, really, I’m thinking.

Dr. John Hart: In integrative medicine, that’s exactly the case. We go straight to the gut to start with. Because if you present with a problem in your body and you’ve got a leaky gut problem, if that leaky gut problem is not causing the problem in your body, it’s aggravating it for sure and you never going to win if you don’t get the gut fixed first.

And because a dysfunctional gut is so common, you know, to varying degrees, you can always get an improvement in everybody’s health.

I routinely do a six-week gut detox thing. Which is removing the common food allergens and chemicals from people’s diet and putting in basic nutrients for repairing the gut, repairing the liver, repairing the kidneys for as you detox your waste removal organs, and nutrients for gut repair. And I think about 95-plus percent of people lose a kilogram of fat a week. They sleep better. They have more energy, better mood, better libido. Their whole body responds to just cleaning out their gut.

Guy Lawrence: Wow. Who wouldn’t want a piece of that?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. You can’t have a healthy gut in this society without taking active steps to achieve it. It won’t happen just on the normal diet, the normal XXunintelligibleXX [:22:53.8].

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. You’ve got to be proactive.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: And outside of that normal diet and, you know, stress management and those five almost pillars that you spoke about earlier, is there any specific supplementation that would be the norm, I guess, to treat leaky gut or at least to manage it or prevent it?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. So, if I’m worried about somebody’s gut, I’ll do some food sensitivity tests to find out what …

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: … they’re irritated; they’re sensitive to and remove those from their diet.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: Or if people can’t afford that, because that can get expensive, you could just remove all the common ones. You know, dairy, gluten and XXwheat ??? 0:23:34.000XX and barley and corn, soy. You know they’re sort of the most common ones. So, most people get an improvement just by doing that.

It’s difficult in this society though. We’re a wheat- and milk-based society. So, it takes a bit of planning to do it, but it’s quite possible.

And then look at the gut, the bugs, the microbiome and either do some tests to find out what’s in there or just do a bit of a shotgun approach, which also works very well with most people, where you just do some antibiotic herbs, put in some good; which kill the bad bugs. Put in some probiotics that are the good bugs. Put in some nutrients like glutamine and B vitamins and zinc and vitamin D to help gut repair. And silymarin is the active ingredient of milk thistle to support liver function. Those are a few things that have been used for thousand of years.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, right.

Dr. John Hart: So, as a shotgun approach, which everybody feels better on, whether it’s enough for a particular person depends on what their specific issues are, which the testing can help you. But everybody feels better on when we do that.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, I can imagine. And another thought that just sprung in there is, because obviously you’ve stressed the importance of the gut and we always talk about leaky gut, but that’s actually just really reinforced the importance of looking after your gut.

And you know, the question that has popped into mind from that is that anyone that goes to their local doctor with symptoms or problems, I’ve never heard of a GP doctor ever saying, “What’s the state of your gut?” Not that I try to go to doctors much. I mean, I guess, why would that be and would that change over time, do you think, John?

Dr. John Hart: Well, I think it will change over time, because there’s so much science behind it now. But you have to remember that doctors are trained in hospitals. And hospitals are there to deal with life-threatening illnesses, infections, trauma, cancers, that sort of things. So, medical schools train doctors to deal with end-stage disease; life-threatening end-stage disease. And modern medicine is very good at doing that and that’s all very useful if you’ve got one of those.

But if you were to not get it in the first place, that’s not what doctors get trained in, you know. They spend less than a day on nutrition and less than an hour on exercise, next to nothing on sleep, you know. These are all the four pillars and hormones are only addressed in terms of extreme hormone excess or extreme hormone deficiencies, not levels that are a little bit too high or a little bit too low, depending on the hormone causing damage and problems over time.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

sj: So, yeah. They’re just not in their training, whereas if you’ve got a naturopath, it’s the other way around. You know, they’re not trying to deal with acute trauma or life-threatening infections, but very good at dealing with all this, you know, the Big Five.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: That’s right. Prevention, I guess.

Guy Lawrence: Go on, Stu.

Stuart Cooke: Well, I was …

Dr. John Hart: Prevention and early detection, that’s where the; because you do your prevention stuff and you’re going to definitely decrease your risk of getting anything. But you still get stuff. So, if you do get something going wrong, you want to pick it up early, rather than wait a couple of decades down the track when the damage is done and is permanent and much harder to reverse.

I think most people on average; if when you’re 40 you’ve got five hidden diseases. So, hidden disease is something that you don’t know you’ve got, because it hasn’t caused any symptoms that you feel. Hasn’t caused any signs that somebody else can see. But it will in a couple of decades, whether that’s a heart attack, a stroke or cancer or dementia, or whatever.

So, most people on average, five hidden diseases when you’re 40. Ten when you’re 50. Twenty-three when you’re 70. And one of them will kill you. Depends on which one gets bad first. But most people don’t even know they’ve got them, because they’re hidden and they don’t go looking because Medicare doesn’t pay for that.

Medicare will give you million of dollars once you’ve got the cancer or the heart attack.

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: They’ll spend million of dollars on you then, but they’ll give you next to nothing to stop you getting it.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: So, it’s not a conspiracy theory. I’m not a conspiracy theorist, but you know, that’s where the money is. The money is your paid business. If people are sick and you can just control the symptoms, but keep them sick, that’s; from a business point of view; pharmaceutical companies, surgery companies, that’s where the money is. You want to do that.

You don’t want to stop people getting sick with relatively cheap non-profitable, non-payable treatments. That’s not a business model.

Stuart Cooke: It isn’t. Well, there’s not money if you don’t visit the doctor’s, I guess.

Guy Lawrence: That’s incredible. That blows my mind.

Stuart Cooke: So, with that alarming statistic in mind, I would love to talk to you a little bit about your strategies for life extension; which we were blown away with your talk at the PrimalCon earlier on in the year. So what; can you just run us through your strategies a little bit, in terms of …

Dr. John Hart: So, the big picture is identify the sources of inflammation; the causes of inflammation and get rid of them and put in things that dampen down inflammation. Find out what you should have that you’re missing or put in other things that are optional that help dampen down inflammation.

That’s sort of how I think about it as the big picture. Then to burrow in a bit deeper, you’ve got to look at the big five. So, diet, exercise, stress management, sleep and the hormones. So, if you want to look at each one of those, you know, I’m sure people listening to this have got a pretty good picture.

I like the primal type diet.

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: But you’ve still got to; you can still have allergies.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: Your individual allergies to content of any diet. So, ideally you’re finding out what you’re sensitive to and then doing all the low-carb, no processed foods. Get all the chemicals out.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: Organics in season. Locally grown, all that sort of stuff.

Exercise. You know the body is designed to move. I think as Mark says, Mark Sisson says, it’s, “Move off. Lift heavy and sprint occasionally.” I think that’s got the guts of it, a lot of science behind how that all works now. You know we’re designed to move. The body does not like not moving. Now, NASA worked out on the astronauts, that lost of gravity is a killer.

If you sit for more than eight hours a day, it’s as bad as smoking for your health, even if you’re exercising every day at the gym. So, doing two of these is a bad thing. So, getting a stand up desk or standing up from hour desk every half hour and taking ten steps to get the blood going and moving actively.

So, moving often and lifting heavy, you know, maintaining muscle mass is crucial. You know, we used to think that fat and muscle were just benign tissue, you know. Fat was just a little balloon of energy for use later. And muscle was just something we had to have, because it moved our skeleton. But; and even bones now, as well. Bones, muscles and fat they’re all endocrine glands; they secrete substances into your blood, which affects the health of the rest of your body.

So, fat cells. Fat, fat cells are XXover four? Overfull? fat cells 0:30:47.000XX to create inflammatory adipokines, which damage the rest of the body.

Muscles secrete over 700 XXmyoclinesXX, which support the health of the body. So, muscles secrete a thing called; one of the things it secretes is a thing called brain-derived neurotrophic factor. It was first discovered in the brain, it’s a really important thing for growing new brain cells and brain cell health. The muscles also make it when you’re exercising; you’ve got healthy muscles.

So, that’s one of the ways that exercise improves brain health, brain function, and decreases dementia.

Guy Lawrence: So, would increasing your muscle mass help with all that?

Dr. John Hart: Yes. Yeah, within limits, obviously, but more to the point, maintaining it.

Guy Lawrence: Okay.

Dr. John Hart: At a more 20-, 30-year-old level.

Guy Lawrence: Yup.

Dr. John Hart: So, the loss of muscle mass as you get older is called sarcopenia. And if you lose muscle mass, you lose these pro-health XXmyoclinesXX that come from the muscle. And you lose your ability to move your bones so your bones become weaker, which means you lose the hormones that come out of the bones. So, you get a double whammy. Where you’ve got weak muscles more than likely to fall and unable to stop yourself. Because you’ve got weak muscles you haven’t been able to maintain strong bones, so you’ve got weak bones, you’re more likely to break the bone when you fall on it.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: And you know, fractured hips and femurs and wrists are common causes of death, because people get immobilized and then everything goes down in a spiral and they end up with chest infections or clots in their legs and it ends up killing them.

Stuart Cooke: So, weight-bearing exercises then, you think, would be a good strategy for long lasting health?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah, yeah. There’s a lot of stuff coming out saying that cardiovascular exercise is not the best way to go. So, aerobic training; see the whole aerobic thing started in the 1960s when Dr. Kenneth Cooper discovered that if; instead of putting people with heart attacks in bed for a week or weeks …

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: …you got them up and walking, they did much better with a bit of exercise. Not too much, but a bit of exercise.

So, that’s the whole aerobics train, where the craze came from. That’s when the jogging craze all started from, from that a bit of aerobics exercise is good enough for heart attacks, so it must be good for everybody. So, everybody went nuts on that.

But you can overdo it. See, aerobic training is quite stressful on the body so, that pushes cortisol up and that just stresses hormones up and that’s a bad idea.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: And especially the XXultra stuffXX. It’s very catabolic on the body and break down heart tissue now. They’ve done studies showing marathoners destroy heart tissue. Now the damage gets scarring in their hearts from that severe XX???stuff [::33:28.0].

Dr. John Hart: So, what you want to do is just want to maintain your muscle mass and maintain the stress on the bones. And doing 60 XXtechnical glitchXX [:33:34.6] you better get 100 percent. You’ve got to tell the tissues, “You are not strong enough for what I want you to do. You need to get stronger and that’s 100 percent.” And that’s heavy weights. And you can do heavy weights and by keeping the rest period minimum, between sets, you can get a really good cardiovascular workout. So, you get a heart workout. You get a lung workout. You get a breathing muscle workout. As well as, putting a load on muscles and tendons and bones so that they can maintain it …

Guy Lawrence: Interestingly enough as well, John, back in my day as a fitness trainer, I’d see increased lung capacities more through weight training than I would through cardiovascular, you know, those exercises as well.

Dr. John Hart: If you go higher than 100 percent with weight training that’s going to push your limit. Where 60 to 70 percent of your maximum heart rate, that’s not pushing the limit. That’s grueling, it’s long, but it’s not …

Stuart Cooke: What about if you go hard with high intensity workout for five to ten minutes? Swinging a kettle bell for instance and things like that.

dJ; Yeah. So, that the sprint often part of it.

Stuart Cooke: Yes.

Dr. John Hart: No, no. That’s the sprint occasionally part of it.

Stuart Cooke: Right.

Dr. John Hart: So, move often, lift heavy …

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: … sprint occasionally. So, I mean, I like high intensity interval training. Only once or twice a week if you’re doing it properly. And it’s 30 seconds flat out. 90 seconds slow. Resting. And then repeat that a few times.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: By the time you get into five or six or seven sets of that, you’re puffing like a train and you know you’ve worked out. You’ve got large muscle groups going. And that’s telling all the brain that the whole body is under stress and then the brain starts releasing all these growth hormones to get you to stronger, anabolic hormones.

Stuart Cooke: Got it.

Dr. John Hart: And so you don’t want to be doing XX??? risersXX and bicep curls and wrist curls [:35:22.5]. That’s sort of a waste of time. That’s not going to have an systemic effect. You have to do all these big muscle group movements.

So, high-intensity indoor training, I wouldn’t do sprinting, because I think there’s a bit of XXunintelligibleXX [:35:33.7] risk for that.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: XXunintelligibleXX [:35:35.1], swimming, rowing, auto climber, you’re not lifting a kettle bell weight around.

Stuart Cooke: Okay.

Dr. John Hart: But not too much. There’s people that do that high-intensity stuff four or five times a week and they’re just on a XX 0:35:48.000 hidingXX to overtraining and injury and illness.

Stuart Cooke: Interesting. Interesting. And we won’t see you anytime soon on the City to Surf, then, I take it?

Dr. John Hart: Absolutely correct. You might see me XXthere?? 0:36:00.000XX a couple of times, but that’s all.

Guy Lawrence: I don’t know if you saw in the headlines this week; I say “headlines.” I saw it in the news anyway. I can’t remember the gentleman’s name in America. Someone… XX0:36:14.000XX. But they reckon they’re only maybe 10, 20 years away from being able to make the human being live to up to a thousand years, was the claim in the title of the article. I don’t know if you saw that, but do you have anything…

Dr. John Hart: The guys who look into this stuff are basically saying we should all now live to 120. Genetically we programmed to live to 120 and there are people who do it. The only reason we don’t is because we kill ourselves off earlier by doing all the wrong things or not doing the right things. XXThe Big Five 0:36:42.000XX is a start.

So, most people’s genes should enable to body to survive to 120. A few have got just bad genes; they’re gonna die early no matter what. But most people, it’s 120, as long as you’ve got your lifestyle properly sorted out.

But in the next 10 to 30 years there’s a bunch of technologies that are going to become available, generally available, that are already in research. You know, with XXtelemarized 0:37:05.000XX activation and gene therapy and cloning and nanotechnology, artificial organs, that routinely people are going to live to 150.

In fact, they are pretty sure now that the child that’s going to live to 150 has already been born. There’s already children around who are going to live to 150 with this technology that comes out.

And then once you get to 150, once you get a handle on what you need to do, you are absolutely past 200, 250. I think that’s going to be pretty… And then the important thing is it’s not gonna be the last 100 years in a nursing home. It’s going to be active, independent, vital, productive, looking after yourself, contributing to society. It’s going to be; actually it’s going to be a big shift in society and we’re actually the cusp of it, the borderline. We’re the last generation that has not had access to this technology for our entire life.

The kids that are being born now are going to have access to this early enough in life that it’s going to significantly extend their health span and their life span.

Guy Lawrence: That’s incredible.

Dr. John Hart: Assuming they do the right thing.

Guy Lawrence: Don’t abuse it. Yeah.

Dr. John Hart: With their lifestyle.

Stuart Cooke: My word. I’m just trying to think, you know, in 150 years’ time, trying to get a park down at Bondi Beach in the Eastern suburbs with all these people.

Dr. John Hart: I bet there will be better transportation then. It will be old news. You’ll go down a wire in a little box or something.

Stuart Cooke: Of course. Teleportation. Sydney Transport will have that in the bag, I’m sure.

So, during your talk that we spoke about a little bit earlier, there were a few words that cropped up, and they were… “Peptides” was one. And I think there was another drug that was linked to anti-aging.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. Metformin.

Stuart Cooke: Metformin. That was right. Is that gonna be part of this strategy, moving forward?

Dr. John Hart: It’ll be part of it. It will still be the Big Five. You’ve heard of the Big Five, and there’s no shortcuts around that. But then there’s things you can supplement the Big Five with. So, that’s where the peptides fit in. There’s a lot of different peptides. Peptide’s just a short protein, and there are ones that can support and supplement processes in your body that are degenerating.

As a general rule, drugs tend to block things. And they block a process, but they also block other things as well, and that’s where the side effects come from. Whereas, the peptides generally… and hormones and vitamins and oils and all of that sort of stuff generally supports functions; increases functions. So, as things decay and degenerate from whatever influences, these things all counteract that and get them back close to the level they were when they were operating 100 percent in your 20s.

So, there’s peptides that increase growth hormone release. Growth hormone’s your major repair hormone. There are peptides that accentuate testosterone’s effect in particular tissues in the body. There are peptides that come from muscles when muscles are stressed, to cause muscle growth, so you can take peptides to accelerate that. There are ones that come from your immune system that trigger tissue repair and fighting infections. There are a whole lot of different ones.

And then metformin’s an interesting one. I first heard about it as the world’s first anti-aging drug, from a doctor in the UK, Richard Lippman, who was nominated for the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1996 for his work with antioxidants.

And he said that metformin the world’s first anti-aging drug, this is why it is, and I take it. So, I thought, that’s interesting, so I went and looked at it and he’s right. So, most drugs have their main effect; well, the main effect that we use them for. And then other effects as well, which we call side effects. But metformin has a bunch of side effects, but unlike most drugs, the side effects are all really good.

So, it has its main effect, which is sugar control. That’s why it’s still used around the world as the first drug for treating diabetes. Which is a good thing to keep your sugar levels down, because the sugar in your body is a toxin as well as being a drug of addiction. But it has all these side effects: it drops your cholesterol, it’s anti-inflammatory, it stimulates the same genes as calorie-restriction diets, it’s anti-cancer, blocks the conversation of XXerevatase?? 0:41:45.000XX, which is an enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen.

It does a whole lot of other things which are all very positive things. So, that’s probably why it’s the world’s first anti-aging drug.

And it started off life as just an extract of the French lilac plant, which has been used for thousands of years to treat diabetes. But it’s the active ingredient that’s been put out in the drug.

And after a hundred years of being out, it’s still the first drug around that worked for diabetes, despite the billions of dollars that have been spent on new anti-diabetic drugs. They’re not as good, because they don’t have all the side effects metformin has.

Stuart Cooke: Wow. It almost sounds like that particular pill would do so much more for us than our multivitamin; our daily multivitamin.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah, I don’t know if I’d go that far. I think a good multivitamin is very supportive of a whole lot of things, but I think I; I sort of routinely put people one five things. If you walk through the door of my clinic, there’s five things you’re gonna get, because the evidence shows that bang for your buck, it’s all there.

And that’s a quality vitamin, a good probiotic, a good fish oil, a good magnesium source, and vitamin D. Because everybody’s low on vitamin D. Vitamin D’s not a vitamin; it’s a hormone, which is anti-inflammatory, so that’s all that inflammation stuff, it’s a powerful anti-inflammatory. It’s anti-cancer, it’s immune system regulatory, calcium for bones and tissues. And the thing, the trouble, with vitamin D is, A, it’s a hormone. And, B, you can’t make it if you don’t get sun on your skin.

As we’re all cave-dwellers now, we don’t get enough sun on our skin. Because remember, we evolved on the equator with no clothes on. The human species evolved living on the equator with no clothes on. And we’re hunter-gatherers. So we’re outside all day. And that’s how much sun we expect to get on our skin.

We don’t do that anymore. We’ve moved away from the equator, so it’s too cold, so we’ve got to wear clothes, we get worried about getting sunburned, so we have Slip-Slop-Slap. And so we don’t get anywhere near the sun exposure our body expects, so we can’t make the vitamin D that our body wants, and we suffer the consequences.

There’s some guy who worked it out that 200 times more people die from not enough sun exposure, i.e. not enough vitamin D, than who die from too much sun exposure, i.e. skin cancers.

Guy Lawrence: Wow.

Stuart Cooke: Boy, that’s an interesting stat.

Dr. John Hart: And we worry about the excess sun exposure and skin cancers, when it turns out more people are dying from not enough sun exposure.

Guy Lawrence: So, so often, regarding vitamin D, so, during the winter, can we supplement vitamin D and have the same effect for sunshine.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah.

Guy Lawrence: We can.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. It’s the same thing. It’s biogenical. It’s the same thing.

Guy Lawrence: But then come summertime, would we take vitamin D as well?

Dr. John Hart: Well, most people who live and work in the city, they’re cave dwellers, they don’t get enough sun even in summer. Yet most people I see, they’re 50; their vitamin D level is 50 to 80. What you want to be is 150 to 200. That’s the ideal range. So, most people are half of what it should be.

And even in summer, unless you spend the weekend down at the surf club or you’re working outside. But just because you’re outside doesn’t mean you’re getting sun. If you’ve got clothes on, if you’re standing upright and the sun’s hitting your head, not your face, and if you’re in the shadows like you are walking around the city, you’re not getting any sun. So, just because you’re outside doesn’t mean you’re getting sun exposure on your skin.

Stuart Cooke: So, what would be the optimal amount of exposure, full-body exposure, from a time perspective.

Dr. John Hart: Well, they reckon 10 to 20 minutes of lying in your bathers, flat on the ground, when the sun’s overhead, is about what you need to make enough every day. But in winter, even that might not be enough, because they say that 37 degrees north and south of the equator, the sun is so low in the horizon that it has more atmosphere to go through before it hits; the sunrise has more atmosphere to go through before it hits the ground that it gets filtered out and even in those positions north and south, you can’t get enough sun exposure.

Guy Lawrence: Wouldn’t cod liver oil be a good vitamin D source?

Dr. John Hart: No. That’s not enough.

Guy Lawrence. Oh. It’s not enough?

Dr. John Hart: Most people need four to six thousand international units a day. And your standard, over-the-counter vitamin D capsule dose is a thousand. So, most people are not even getting that. You know, a normal multivitamin might have two or three hundred international units. So, that’s not touching the edges. And you’re not going to get enough from food. There’s a little bit in different fatty foods. But not enough; not compared to what the body’s expecting to be able to make itself from sun exposure over your whole body, all day, as a hunter-gatherer over the equator.

Guy Lawrence: Got it.

Stuart Cooke: Got it.

Interesting.

Guy Lawrence: Great advice. Yeah.

Because most people don’t even think about these things, at all, you know. So, next time I see you running on the street in your swimmers, I’ll know why you’re doing it.

Stuart Cooke: Doctor’s orders. I’m going to the beach. I know you take cod liver oil capsules, Guy, so I’m sure that you’re going to be rattling away on the internet ordering yourself some pills tonight.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah.

Stuart Cooke: That’s interesting.

So, we have kind of touched on this a little bit. Just your thoughts on the future for the medical industry, whether you think that that’s going to be an integration of the nutritionists and naturopaths and doctors and DNA specialists and the like.

Dr. John Hart: Yeah, I think… So, you’ve got conventional medicine, which is very good at acute illnesses and symptoms of serious diseases. And then you’ve got the integrative medicine branch, which is more the preventative early detection sort of things. And there’s not so much money in those, because there’s no XXpayable? 0:47:33.000XX drugs and expenses there.

So, there’s a lot of forces wanting to keep things as they are, because that’s where the money is. And a lot of money being spent by very clever companies with very clever marketing people with huge budgets to promote the current status quo.

So, they’re not gonna let things slide without a big fight. But I think people are starting to walk, talk with their feet. I think people are realizing that modern medicine has its advantages but it has its weaknesses and that alternative or integrative or natural medicine, whether it’s through a naturopath or integrative doctor or herbalist, can provide other things that are not available. And that’s the two together that gives you the best overall result.

So, if you can use the technology, access the technology that we’ve got to do testing and early detection, and use the nutrition that’s been around for thousands of years, basically, and the basic rules that have been around for thousands and millions of years, and put them all together, I think you’re going to get the best result.

Stuart Cooke: OK. That wouldn’t be that dissimilar, really, to what you guys are doing, I guess, right now. Would it be?

Dr. John Hart: Yeah. That’s basically what integrative or functional medicine is is using the technologies and the science and the physiology to determine information about how things work and combining it with non-patentable tools or technologies that have been shown to work, not only from thousands of years of experience, but also now with the science, we know how all these different herbs and vitamins and minerals, how they work, and how they decrease inflammation and how that then helps with health and function.

Stuart Cooke: Perfect.

Guy Lawrence: Fantastic.

John, we have two wrap-up questions on the podcast for every guest. And the first one’s very simple. But it does intrigue people. Can you tell us what you ate today?

Dr. John Hart: Today, breakfast was a bit on the run so I had some activated organic mixed nuts and some dried organic blueberries. And then I had a late lunch, which was meat and veg, basically. And then I had an early dinner just before this, which was basically meat and veg again.

Guy Lawrence: Perfect.

And the other question is, what’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Dr. John Hart: I think my rowing coach said to me in high school, “You only get out of basket what you put into it.”

Stuart Cooke: That’s true.

Dr. John Hart: The second bit of advice I got was that persistence is one of the best skills to have.

Guy Lawrence: Persistence. Yeah, that is true as well.

Dr. John Hart: There’s no shortcuts to things, you know? Things that are worth having, that are valuable, you’ve got to work for them. You’ve got to put some time and attention onto it.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, you’ve got to go for it. That’s prudent.

And for everyone listening to this who goes, “My God, I’ve got to come see John Hart,” or wants to learn more, where would be the best place for us to point them, John?

Dr. John Hart: Well, I work at Elevate Clinic in Sydney in the CBD. Spring Street. So, Elevate.com.au. And I also have an online business that sells peptides, so that’s PeptideClinics.com.au. That’s got a website with information and there’s a chat line and people online from 7 a.m. to 2 a.m. if people want to talk about peptides there.

Guy Lawrence: Fantastic. Brilliant.

Well, we’ll put the links up once the show goes out and everything else. We’ll put them at the bottom of the post. Because we transcribe the blog as well, so if people want to read it they can find out more.

But, John, thank you so much for coming on the show today. That was fantastic. I have no doubt a lot of people are going to get a lot out of that and certainly get everyone thinking. That was amazing.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely. Absolutely. I know I did. I can’t wait to rewind and listen to it again.

Dr. John Hart: Thanks for the opportunity, guys.

Guy Lawrence: Awesome. We appreciate it, John. Thank you very much.

Stuart Cooke: Thank you, John.

fuel your body with powerful, natural and nourishing foods – click here –

Donal O’Neill: Cereal Killers Movie

The video above is 01:24 long. Use your time wisely ;)

‘In my research I noticed that International tobacco company Philip Morris, in the early nineties, when the heat came on they started to buy up food companies. They are a brilliantly sinister company.

They identified that sugar is very much the same as nicotine; get them young get them hooked & you’ve got them for life.’ – Donal O’Neil, producer of the Cereal Killers Movie


The Full Interview

We chat to Donal O’Neill, the man behind the awesome documentary Cereal Killers. If you haven’t seen it then make it a must!

CLICK HERE for Audio Version

downloaditunesIn this episode we talk about:-

    • The inspiration behind the movie
    • Why professor Tim Noakes is awesome!
    • The Australian cricketers and their low carb high fat diet
    • What sports benefit most from LCHF diet
    • How to increase testosterone & sex drive with men in their 40′s
    • And much more…

CLICK HERE for all Episodes of 180TV

Cereal Killers Movie Info

- Watch the Movie Here

- Follow On Facebook Here


Interview with Donal O’Neill Transcript

Stuart Cooke: Donal, how are you?

Donal O’Neill: I’m good. Good to see you.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, thank you so much. You can hear me, Guy?

Guy Lawrence: Fantastic. Everything’s clear. Everything’s good. So fingers crossed, no technical issues and we’ll be awake.

Stuart Cooke: So, I feel like I’m going to, I feel like I’m about to speak to a movie star.

Donal O’Neill: So do I.

Stuart Cooke: All right. Yeah, you must be talking about Guy.

Guy Lawrence: Well, so let’s start.

Stuart Cooke: Okay, fantastic.

Guy Lawrence: Hey, this is Guy Lawrence, and welcome to Episode 20 of the podcasts. I just checked, and we’ve got Mr. Stuart Cooke, as always, and our special guest today is Mr. Donal O’Neill, the man behind the movie Cereal Killers. Donal, thanks for joining us, mate.

Donal O’Neill: Thanks for having me.

Guy Lawrence: I just want to clarify some numbers, well, just if people hadn’t heard of your movie Cereal Killers, we aren’t talking about Hannibal Lecter or anything, are we? We’re actually talking about more the breakfast cereal, you know, because…

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, we’re talking much more; much more dangerous than Hannibal Lecter.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Exactly, I have no doubt in it. I have no doubt, and look, just to get the ball rolling, you know, can you just tell us a little bit about yourself and, before we get stuck into the movie, what led you to actually making it, as well. Just give us a little bit of a background.

Donal O’Neill: Sure. Well, I probably, probably the first thing my mum would say is that I was an inquisitive little bugger as a kid, so, I’m now 42 years old. Several years ago my dad had a heart attack. I come from a family of lean, very athletic men, who don’t really put on weight and have never abused themselves, but we get sick. We get heart disease and diabetes, and, when I discovered that, I guess, I rolled up a lot of the energy I had and a lot of the passion that I developed over the years as an athlete and everything else I’ve ever done, and I just set out on a journey to discover what the hell happened, and, once I started that journey, it kind of snowballed.

And, as I said, I’ve always been a very inquisitive person, it kind of turned to anger, the more information that I unearthed, the more determined I got to get the story out. That’s just the nature of me. You know, back in Ireland, I’m probably known for establishing what would be the equivalent in Australia of the AFLPA. So I set up the players union for Gaelic football, so I do like to confront and challenge convention.

If I see something that I believe in, I’ll push for it. I didn’t intend to push this hard, but here we are, and, obviously, the movie’s been released in December, and it’s gone great. We had a tremendous reception in Australia and that continues. Australia is topping our charts for online screenings at the moment.

Guy Lawrence: Fantastic.

Stuart Cooke: Wow.

Guy Lawrence: Because the movie is no, I mean, it’s no small project, mate, you know, it’s a big, bug task to put that together. When did you start? Like, when did you set out to make it?

Donal O’Neill: Well, like said to some people just yesterday, it’s probably taken about three years. I can do the next one in about three months, but I can tell you, I had XXfrogsXX [0:03:28] along the way, guys. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, which was actually an enormous help. I got, I ran into many roadblocks.

Probably the smoothest process, once the story and the screening, sorry, the filming, I knew exactly what I wanted to capture, but once you move into post-production in a movie, that’s where the magic and the madness happens, and we ran into some problems there.

But the delays that we encountered, you know, to an outsider it might look like this whole thing was planned and the timing was beautiful, but I just started. I just kept going, and then I just decided to put it out there, and “let’s stop,” but, you know, it was very, very fortuitous in many ways, because we had stopped filming when Dr. Peter Brukner contacted us and really got behind the movie and right then introduced us to Shane Watson, Dave Warner, and Usman Khawaja who will be well-known to your Australian listeners.

And, you know, at that point you’ve got an editor and director saying, “Oh, you can’t really cut them in. The movie’s done,” and I’m like, “Well, I don’t know anything about movies, so I’m telling you these guys are going in the movie, one way or the other.”
Guy Lawrence: Absolutely.

Donal O’Neill: So, I just kept breaking rules, I guess, ignoring the laws of filmmaking and eventually we got there, but it was, it was great fun. It was a great journey and something tells me it’s probably on the start.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah. I think so. Have you been, have the Carbivores contacted you? Have you been hit by any kind of negativity from the other train of thought? You know? The Bread Munchers?

Donal O’Neill: It’s kind of bizarre. The first, kind of, negative slant that I’ve seen actually came from Ireland just yesterday, but we’re great at that. I mean, we love it. We love a kind of good/bad news story, let’s be honest. When it’s raining outside, you don’t want too much good news, you know.

Stuart Cooke: Is that right?

Donal O’Neill: It’s been absolutely incredible. People have been very, very generous with their commentary, and I, honestly, I had no idea how it was going to be received. When we went to Melbourne for the premiere there, it was very interesting. We had a couple of hundred people and to watch it with a crowd, to see how they reacted to various parts of the movie was very interesting for me, because at this stage I’ve seen it 200 times and I’ve been through editing. It’s a big thing.

Guy Lawrence: Could you, just for anyone listening to this that hasn’t seen the movie, could you just sum it up in a nutshell, what it’s about essentially?

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, well, what I did was I went on a journey to see if I could affectively hack my genes using food as the instrument and, like I mentioned earlier, coming from a family with a history of heart disease and diabetes, I wanted to see if there was an intervention I could create for myself that would help me drop dead healthy, and I researched that for, sort of, two years and the conclusion I came to was that a very high fat diet, naturally occurring fats, of course, was probably a pretty good starting point.

So, I teamed up with Prof. Tim Noakes and kept trying for 28 days I had a diet consisting of 70 percent fat. I ate about 25 eggs a week, a kilo macadamia nuts, two kilos of beef, and full-fat everything. No wheat or sugar.

And I did that under full medical supervision, so I got my blood panels done before and after, during, etc., etc. We just sat back to see what would happen and along the way we discussed the issue of, let’s say, conventional wisdom as it relates to things like cholesterol and diabetes and fat and carbohydrates, you know, Tim Noakes, Dr. John Briffa, Peter Brukner and others and that’s pretty good.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, and I have to say, mate, you, you know, you did a stellar job. We were both discussing the movie and I think you simplified the message fantastically, as well, and as far as I’m concerned, there’s not a person that would not benefit watching this movie. I think it’s a must, you know, and people are not just putting that connection together at all about the damage and effects of sugars and carbohydrates in their diet, you know. It’s just, it’s incredible. It just amazes me that that’s not there.

Donal O’Neill: It’s interesting for me. I was back in Australia for the premiere. I haven’t been down in seven years and you could just see people getting bigger, and you can see the damage, I mean, it’s like everywhere.

I mean, Ireland, the U.K., it’s just the enemy. I think we’re about to XXpepXX [0:08:10] England for the first time in anything by becoming more obese and unhealthy than them, but, which, you know, it’s very, very sad to see, but I’ve worked with the big food companies. We’ve tried to engage some of them, like Kellogg’s, for the movie, and they wouldn’t even return our calls. They know what they’re doing.

I mean, don’t make any mistake about that, and I know they know what they’re doing, and they certainly know. I mean, the general public doesn’t really know, but when you have, you know, X billion dollars in advertising media telling you one thing, it’s very, very difficult for XXmatchesXX [0:08:43] to break through against that, and particularly when you have an XXundergrowingXX [0:08:51] war that’s absolutely ongoing, and some of the trends and some of the tactics that I saw.

I mean, they would shock you, but I could’ve made ten documentaries, but the trick for me was to try to write The Sun newspaper as opposed to The Times because there’s all the medical information is there, I just tried to make something as an average guy and try to make it accessible to, you know, the man on the street.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely. Well, it definitely worked. It’s so watchable and so beautifully laid out that it just made perfect sense. I’ve watched it twice, and I shall watch it again. It’s awesome.

Donal O’Neill: Thank you.

Guy Lawrence: What, Tim Noakes, like, he’s a hero of ours. We think Tim’s awesome. When did you first get in touch with Tim? Did you, is it, as it, you went down the rabbit hole looking into the whole high-fat diet and came across Tim?

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, you know, it’s funny, when you just put things out there. I’ve been doing my research. I’ve been sort of mentioning to some people that, you know, I’d written a book, and I thought, “This isn’t enough.”

I’m going to, I didn’t publish it, I said, “I’m going to take this further, and I started to tell some people I was planning to make a movie. And people say, “Well, why did you make and kept thinking this was all planned and, again, it wasn’t. This was fortuitous.

I mean, I actually thought that if I’m going to film this, I don’t think anybody wants to see dreary wet Ireland XXon a health show?XX[0:10:13] I’m a marketing person, and I thought, “If I’m going to film this, I might as well do it somewhere beautiful, because I’m going to be doing it for a month, and that’ll just make it easier to watch.”

So that was the level of, I guess, stupidity I was operating at. It was that simple, and I’d come to Cape Town for something else and, you know, coming from a sports background myself, it just stunned me that there was a sports scientist in this country who was, like, a household name. I was going to dinner parties and people were arguing over Tim Noakes and du, du, du, du, du, and I thought, “I suppose I’d better contact Tim Noakes.”

I emailed him out of the blue, I mean, he hadn’t broken out yet in a big way on that whole issue. He had just kind of raised his head above the pulpit, and he invited me in and his generosity with his resources, his knowledge, his time, with everything, was just incredible, and as soon as he opened the door, you know, I just grabbed the director and camera man and I put them on a plane and I said, “We’re going to do this now,” and the director was like, “Well, we need preproduction,” and I said, “Well, there is no preproduction. We start in about two weeks’ time.”

Stuart Cooke: That’s right.

Guy Lawrence: XXBest way. Best way.XX [0:11:25]

Donal O’Neill: I don’t know what I’m doing type thing, but, yeah, the director Yolanda Barker is a young Irish lady, and she did a phenomenal job, and Raja Nundlall, the D. P. is, he does a lot of work with Ireland as an actual broadcaster so, to be honest, they carried me through it. I just sort of said, “Roll the cameras and off we go.”

The rest was in large part due to the like of Tim Noakes and John Briffa.

Stuart Cooke: Fantastic. It was great to see the Aussie cricketers, as well, as, you know, sporting professionals, you know, trying and benefitting from this approach, as well. What do you think about other sports? Do you think this will follow on?

Donal O’Neill: We were just discussing this yesterday, in fac. I believe one sport that will benefit enormously is golf.

Stuart Cooke: Right.

Donal O’Neill: Because, as you well know, one of the things that, I think, really the first thing that anybody notices if they move to a high-fat, low-carb diet and they consume real food is a stabilization in energy levels, and I think it’s possibly too late for my own golfing career, but I can see a sport, like golf, where the guys are out there for five, five-and-a-half hours plodding along. It’s got to be a significant benefit for their concentration, because one slip can cost you a hell of a lot.

I think that’s one sport that could benefit enormously. OI mean, obviously, the endurance sports are already benefitting and, you know, guys like Timmy Olson that I’ve been in touch with, the ultra-endurance athlete in the U.S., their stories are just staggering, and I go back to cricket…

Guy Lawrence: Cricket, yeah, yeah, yeah…

Guy Lawrence: The other thing I wanted to clarify, as well, that was mentioned, Peter Brukner, he’s the Australian cricket team nutritionist, that’s right, yeah?

Donal O’Neill: He’s the team doctor.

Guy Lawrence: Team doctor, okay, so he’s been advising the cricketers on the high-fat diet, essentially.

Donal O’Neill: Well, it’s interesting. Peter was with Liverpool Football Club prior to the Australian cricketers, but he’d only really adopted this mantra himself around the time that he was leaving Liverpool, but, you know, he’s got a big presence in football, so, you know, he’s going to have an impact on what he’s achieving with the cricketers. It’s going to start to filter, right?

And, like I mentioned, when we’ve got the L.A. Lakers stateside and guys like Timmy Olson and then Peter Brukner advising athletes in Australia and the U.K. It’s going to happen. I have no doubt.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, that’s awesome. That’s awesome. So where to from here? You’re essentially going to the States to promote the movie; to the L.A. Lakers, do you have anything else in the pipeline coming up or are you just going to keep like you’ve been doing and just see what happens as you go?

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, kind of making it up as we go along, but it’s been; I think someone’s writing the story over my shoulder, because the reason we’re going to the U.S. is pretty interesting. We’d obviously put the movie up on Kickstarter mid last year and off the back of that one particular person who had missed the Kickstarter XXget?XX [0:14:40] was a gentleman called Sami Inkinen. Sami is an incredible individual. He is a world Iron Man age group champion. He’s about 38, 39. He’s also a spectacularly successful software entrepreneur and he’s based out of San Francisco.

So he contacted me out of the blue and just said, “I’m going to help.” I guess, you know, this guy won Ironman on a diet of fat, so he knows, and he’s now in a position where he’s using his resources and his expertise to start to preach this message.

He’s somebody that’s going to, you know, probably emerge as a pretty big player in this whole XXaction?XX [0:15:21] in my opinion, because it’s great having all the medics and all of that, opinion is very, very valuable, but what we must understand, we have to take the fight to the food companies on their turf. I mean, when Coca Cola issued a press release about their anti-obesity campaign and that goes worldwide in 50 countries simultaneously, and you have, you know, people responding to that. Coke still controlled the pitch.

So, the real food movement needs people who understand the mechanics of business and commerce, or how to raise awareness, sustain it, and how to get a message out that’s consistent and tight. That hasn’t happened yet. That’s what I see happening next. It’s starting to emerge, but it really requires a collaborative effort, and you need somebody with all the resources and all the ability to lead something like that, and Sami is such a guy. I cannot wait to spend some time with him in California and see what he’s got planned, but there’s definitely more to come.

Stuart Cooke: That’s exciting. Very exciting. I was just wanting to shift over to diet and exercise, just at the moment, and I was intrigued by your change in nature and take on the exercise you do in the movie. Was that eight minutes per week?

Donal O’Neill: It was, yes.

Stuart Cooke: Are you still doing eight minutes per week, or have you changed, you changed what you’re doing since then?

Donal O’Neill: No, I probably do a bit more, but what I do, that was eight minutes of, let’s say, cardio work. I trained with very, very high intensity for very, very short periods of time like that and then, probably 90 percent of my time is spent on mobility, so I studied pilates and yoga and lot of this stuff, and obviously I was an athlete and a conditioning coach, so I’m a big believer in movement, but the, like, I’ll turn 43 this year, so, what I noticed when I got to about 37, I certainly noticed that, “Oh, if I don’t change something, I’m probably going to start to dip here,” but my body feels much better than it did five years ago, and that’s, I think, down to diet, number one, and number two, I’m just training much smarter.

You know, for a guy in particular, the stuff that gets left off the table, because most diet books are written for women, are things like testosterone, you know, like a high-carbohydrate diet would dip your testosterone as would endurance training, so everything I do I do to solicit a metabolic response from my body, so I’m always looking to, sort of, hack the hormones as opposed to you’re looking at exactly what’s on the plate or how long am I exercising for.

I did a lot of that research along the way, too, but I’ve been in sports for 30, 35 years, and that’s my natural playground, but even in my days as an international athlete six sprints would have been a complete session, so I’ve come full-circle. Obviously, I wouldn’t be capable of doing the level of training I did back then, either, but I just like to train smart, move smart, and eat smart.

Guy Lawrence: Do you lift weights at all, Donal?

Donal O’Neill: I do lift some weights, but I do a lot of body work and I actually train on the mountain here in Cape Town, so a lot of proprioception work. I train, literally, in the trees. We’ve got a guy here XXaudio distortedXX [0:18:58] so, you know, we’re up on fallen trees sort of eight feet above the ground and we’ve got a big log on our shoulders and I work with the pilates and yoga experts here.

So we’ve been creating our own, well, what we’re calling the Strong Man Plan, which we’ll release the end of this year, so I’ve pulled everything together because I’ve probably put about over a hundred guys through it now, and the results you see are fantastic, particularly for guys when they get past 40. The stuff you used to do doesn’t work, and the worst thing you can do is jogging, because you’re going to drop your testosterone further. You’re going to really not do much good at all. I have a very big interest in getting guys strong and healthy through middle-age, and that’s kind of what my focus is now.

Stuart Cooke: When did you say this program is going to be rolled out over here?

Donal O’Neill: We’re going to roll it out, it’s probably three or four months away. I’ll let you know, but it’s just pulling in all the research I conducted for the movie and, you know, pointing it directly at men, because I think there’s a serious gap for blokes over 40, and I’m just fed up looking at mates of mine putting on their old rugby or football shorts and starting to go out jogging and, you know, eating their Special K breakfast. I mean, it’s a road to nowhere.

Things like sex drive, you know, you start eating a high-fat diet your testosterone is going to get pumped. You start to train without creating too much cortisol in the body, and if you train smart, you know, and you engage the glutes and the big muscle groups with compound movements, you get another shot of testosterone there, so I call them your man markers, so, everything that makes you a bloke can be buffered by smart diet food and movement.

Guy Lawrence: It’s interesting though, that most people, like you say, hit the streets to start running, you know, and, you know…

Stuart Cooke: Just conventional device, right? That’s it. I’ve got to run and I’ve got to limit my calories. That’s the only way I’m going to get slim.

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, I mean, but if you go to the start of any 10 k race, you’ll see fit guys with little pot bellies, you know. It’s a, that’s just how it is, and that’s the body’s hormonal response, you know, it’s not good for the body’s muscular gears, let’s say. It’s like going through the gears of a car. You know, if you’re jogging, the hormonal response in the body is whatever. You know, you get to sprinting and lifting, you’re into fourth gear and that’s when you get the testosterone and the lipolytic hormones releasing into the system. The rewards are tremendous, but, again, slightly counterintuitive, because you can’t do that stuff for a long time.

And one of the other things that frustrates me is that people are advising guys to go out there and sprint, because sprinting is a pretty tough regimen. We’ve created sequences of exercises that are safe and can be done and are very, very affective, because injury is the other thing you’ve got to avoid, which then goes back to the high fat and the lower inflammation in the body.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, especially if you’re, like you say, on a high-carb diet and you go high inflammation. You’re going to pull a hammy in seconds.

Stuart Cooke: But also those that are lean, because I’m naturally very lean. Impossible to put on weight, but that doesn’t mean for one second I’m healthy inside, and so that’s also a great message to push as well.

Donal O’Neill: Well, I mean, that’s exactly where I was starting. That’s the story of my family, the men in my family, so people perceive, you know, okay, generally speaking, it may be correct, but generality doesn’t work. I mean, health is like politics. It’s related to the individual and that’s why people vote best in their political beliefs and how they impact them, and they tend to eat on the same basis what’s really a zero foundation.

Guy Lawrence: How many calories a day were you eating in the movie?

Donal O’Neill: I was up near 4,000 a day, probably about 37, 38. I was stuffing myself. I mean, I was not hungry, I was doing it for the team, as they say, but I’m probably two kilos heavier than when we’ve stopped filming and I eat probably 20, 25 percent less. The more I was eating, it was just stripping me.

Back to the question about sports, I mean, I was a high-jumper and, you know, any sport that has a strong reliance on weight, I mean, if I was jumping, obviously, to be lifting off with two kilos less…On a similar, actually, an improved strength profile would be a phenomenal asset. So, that’s, you know, they’re obviously niche sports, but some of the track and field events, you might see some serious benefits for those athletes.

We’re working with some of the cage fighters here in South Africa at the moment, the mixed martial artists. One of the guys here, he’s stripping 12 kilos coming into a bout. So, that weakens the system, and they know it does. If they can find a way to walk around a train even, you know, two, three, four kilos less than they normally would be, that’s two, three, four kilos less than they’ve got to cut, and that can be beneficial.

We’ve also done some work with the lead Gaelic footballers who are now in a position where they can maintain their championship playing weight with no effort, so they can train and bulk and strengthen up, but they’re not carrying any additional weight to slow them.

Guy Lawrence: Do you think more endurance athletes will jump on board with this?

Donal O’Neill: Yeah. I think there’s a story there. I mean, we connected with the 2008 Olympic triathlon champion and he ate like that. If you sit with Tim Noakes, he’ll tell you about Paula Newby-Fraser who was the greatest triathlete of all time, arguably, South African, nine-time, I think, nine-time Hawaii Iron Man winner, and you know, she ate like this. That’s going back 20 years.

Guy Lawrence: I remember you saying that, yeah.

Donal O’Neill: It’s been there and it’s been used as a tactic, and it just, of course, elite athletes who think they’re on to something they’re not necessarily going to tell you. [AUDIO COMPLETELY DISTORTS] [0:25:42] Athletes identify what their, no pun intended, their sweet spot is for carb intake, because I think for a lot of sports, that will be a requirement to cycle carbs and to time them effectively. That’s what we’re going to see. They’re going to run with the clean foods. They’ll enjoy the anti-inflammatory benefits and whatnot, the cardiovascular benefits.

Noakes is saying, and he’s apologizing to athletes he advised who he believes have gone on and developed diabetes in particular because of the very high-carb sugar content diets that they have been on. I think it’s a fascinating area, and it’s, you know, the research that Tim’s doing in South Africa at the moment, is, I believe the first major study into high-fat for ultra-endurance athletes, so that’s pretty impressive.

Guy Lawrence: Is that right?

Stuart Cooke: Wow. What about the other end of the scale? Children? What would your advice be to, you know, parents who’ve got their own tribe and are currently feeding them the conventional way?

Donal O’Neill: You know, I mean, the results speak for themselves. You know, I can speak about Ireland and I’ve looked at the stats in Australia, and they’re just shocking. It doesn’t work and, you know, for kids, the first thing you’ve got to do is try and limit the sugar intake, because one of the things that I noticed in my research was, you know, Phillip Morris when the heat came on big tobacco in the early ’90s, they started to buy out food companies, the FMCG companies that kicked out crap back then.

And they identified, I mean they’re a brilliantly sinister company, they identified that the sugar trap is very much the same as nicotine. Get them young. Get them hooked on for life. Cereal companies know that. You know, you get on the cereal bandwagon and off you go. You’re on it for life typically.

So, the message for parents has to be the same as it is for adults. Let them eat what you eat, and I think any smart parent has always known that. If the parents aren’t eating correctly in the first instance, then you’re off to a bad start.

I’ve seen kids, I mean, you can see it happening. I’ve seen kids three, four years of age who have never had sugar. I mean parents are just feeding them real food. And you’ve got fantastic little kids running around, I mean, just apparently healthy. Absolutely sparkling with health. My own mate down in Australia…traveled to Australia after college. He stayed there. He’s got two young boys now, and I’ve watched what he’s done with them. You know, it’s eggs for breakfast and real food and Greek yogurt. Farmers Union has the best Greek yogurt I can find in Australia. It’s superb stuff.

The produce in Australia is amazing. I mean, you can do this. I always like to look at, you know, people like to say, “Oh, it’s expensive,” but, you know, eggs aren’t really expensive anywhere. Meat is actually, compared to everything else, it’s actually a pretty good value in Australia. Lamb is cheap.

Stuart Cooke: Absolutely, and, you know, medical bills are more expensive than a box of eggs you know, if you want to go down that route. It’s just crazy thought.

Donal O’Neill: Yeah. Exactly. We’re looking at some project, maybe try and do something specifically for children, movie-related, which would be fantastic, because, whatever, adults can make up their own mind, but you know children are absolutely driven. Exposure to sports stars is hugely important which is why I absolutely wanted to roll the cameras again and get Watson, Warner, and Khawaja in there.

We’re talking to the guys doing screenings down in India where diabetes is just an explosion, but the only thing bigger than that in India is cricket, so a guy like Watson stands up and tells children to eat something, you know they’re going to listen. He might just break though, and you’ll certainly break through with an elite athlete sooner than you will with a medical message to parents.

You know, that’s all good stuff, but the power of celebrity is going to pay an important role in this. I think Damon Gameau’s movie that’s coming out later this year called That Sugar Movie is going to be a phenomenal addition to the debate. He was at the screening in Melbourne, and I can’t wait to see what he’s doing with his movie. It’s going to be superb.

Stuart Cooke: It certainly will be.

Guy Lawrence: You just need the right people endorsing the right things, don’t you, at the end of the day, which sadly happens to be happening?

Donal O’Neill: Yeah, yeah. You know, we interviewed the chairman of the British Egg Council, not in the final cut of the movie, but I think their entire budget for the year to represent the industry is one million pounds. You couldn’t buy a couple of ads on Channel 4.

Stuart Cooke: No.

Donal O’Neill: He made the point that it’s just impossible, so what do you do? You’ve got to think outside the box. You’ve got to look for endorsements from celebrities and people who have access to the media that can get the message out. Otherwise, the bombardment of those billions of dollars that are telling you one thing are pretty hard to counter.

Guy Lawrence: Oh, massively. Massively. Absolutely.

I had another question for you, Donal. Ketosis. You’re permanently in ketosis now? Or you, um, don’t measure?

Donal O’Neill: No, I’m not. I don’t measure it. You know, there are guys who know a hundred times more about this stuff than me. I mean, we’ve got Robert Lustig and Steve Phinney hosting our screenings in San Francisco now next week, and then Mark Sisson is hosting us in L.A.

But, I operate on feel. I mean, I got to the point where I just know what my body wants.

Yesterday, for example, I was about to take down a large pig. I just needed bacon in my life. I just give my body what it wants, when it wants it. So, you know, I eat a very low-carb diet, a lot of fat, but am I in ketosis constantly? No. I’m not.

I’ll have an odd beer, and, you know, some carbs now and then. But I know when I need them and I just listen to my body.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah. Fantastic.

Stuart Cooke: What do you say to those people that insist on counting calories without, you know, the whole lecture? I mean, is there any light that you could guide them to that might just, kind of, start the process?

Donal O’Neill: Well, you know, one of the more ridiculous reasons for making the movie for me as well is just so I wouldn’t have to get into the debate. I feel like walking around with a DVD in the market and just giving them to people, because I was getting jumped at dinner before. It was just bizarre.

So, people get very, very protective about their diet. It is like a religious belief or a political belief but they don’t know what they’re talking about. I mean, I they haven’t done the research.

You know, I was somebody who carb-loaded and did everything, you know, I thought was right for a long, long time. And I had to come in with an open mind to research and the movie. I didn’t know that what I would find was what I would find. But, you know, if you don’t have an open mind to these things, then you’re probably somebody who isn’t gonna give it a chance.

And, to be honest, I never raise the issue with anybody. If somebody wants to talk about it, that’s fine. But I’m not like some evangelist running around looking over people’s shoulders at the dinner plate.

I’d rather just slip a DVD into their pocket and leave them to it, because people have to find their own way.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, of course.

Donal O’Neill: Ultimately, we’re all on our own.

Stuart Cooke: Yep. If I decided to undertake this diet tomorrow, would you recommend that I undergo any testing at all, as you did?

Donal O’Neill: I think it’s; tests are useful for a number of reasons. I mean, first and foremost, psychologically. Because then you feel like you’re committed to something. And when you start; even if you start to write down what you eat, you start to eat healthier. That’s been proven time and again.

So, you take very small steps to make quite a big difference, but what; if you can get the right tests, yes. And you need you HDL, your LDL, and absolutely your triglycerides, your HbA1c is another very important mark. If you can get those, absolutely. But obviously something like HbA1c is a three-month marker. So, you need to give it some time before you revisit that one.

But you would see results within, probably, four to six weeks.

And; you would see them first around your waist. I dropped a buddy of mine off to the airport last night and he’s a businessman in London and every suit he owns he’s had to have it taken in several inches. He just can’t believe it. And this guy was an elite rower who continued to thrash himself in the gym. And just had bit of a, what you would call a “wheat belly.” But it’s gone. And, you know, he was stunned by it.

And, I think, counting of calories; some people like to do that. There’s a lot of tech out there that helps you do it. If that’s your thing, by all means, go on; do it. But, you know, my recommended caloric intake was about 2,800 calories. I had more, almost a thousand calories a day in excess, through the course of filming, lost weight; gained muscle. Go figure.

Stuart Cooke: Yeah, right. You can’t argue with that.

Guy Lawrence: I think testing, as well, helps for people. Because some people are so fearful of fat. You see it all the time, you know. And just to have something behind them so they can embrace it for a month and see what happens. You know? You can’t about it half-assed, as well, and still eat your bread and just increase your fat a bit.

Donal O’Neill: Yeah. Yeah. Some people do that, but, you know; if you’re gonna take one foodstuff out of your diet and get an immediate result, it probably is bread, because it’s something that people tend to overeat. Certainly, in Ireland.

So, I’ve watched guys just take out bread drop enormous amount of weight because they ate half a loaf a day. So, where you’re starting from will determine where you’re gonna get to, I suppose, with specific types of, let’s say, “dietary edits.”

But, you know, I really enjoy working with guys who have been sportsmen, and who are now longer in shape, because someone who has been there. . . When the body clicks and it gets it, you’ve got them, I mean, and they just stick with it because once you start to feel good, I mean, the body remembers that feeling. There’s no going back.

My old brother is 47 and he’s back to his elite football-playing weight. And, you know, he’s a guy who he’ll have a drink once a day. I mean, he’s like that. He doesn’t really deprive himself. But, you know, he just kind of stopped eating bread and just made a few tweaks, and, bang, there he goes.

So, you know, everybody’s different. You can just; once you find your own sweet spot, just run with it.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, absolutely. And; well, what would you. . . If somebody stopped you on the stress who had statins and was asking you questions, what would you say to them? What would your piece of advice be, if he’s on statin drugs; cholesterol drugs?

Donal O’Neill: I mean, the statin thing is; it’s pretty unbelievable to me, what big pharma has done there. And one of the key pieces of research I unearthed was the fact that the pharmaceutical companies have spent in excess of 10 billion U.S. dollars to try to find a drug that would safely raise HDL cholesterol. They haven’t succeeded, but I wanted them to succeed, because I wanted to see what their ad agency was gonna do. “OK, guys, we know we have been lowering your cholesterol for years; we’ve got a great idea: We’re gonna raise it.”

So, yeah. They didn’t achieve that, but. . . That would have been very, very exciting. So, I mean, you’ve got the conventional cardiologists and experts who say, “Yeah, statins could save your life.” And there’s absolutely an anti-inflammatory aspect to statins that provides benefit in the immediate aftermath of a cardiac event. But do they prevent it? Based on the research I’ve seen and, you know, now you’ve got cardiologists like Dr. Aseem Malhotra and Paul Davis and the rest who are steadfast against them as a preventative, too.

I think, you know, the thought leaders in the cardiac world are in a much better position to assess that than me. But I believe them and they’re saying statins are not the way forward.

Guy Lawrence: Definitely.

Stuart Cooke: I’ve got. . .

Guy Lawrence: Oh, go one, Stu.

Stuart Cooke: Well, I was just wondering how we could help spread the message. What could we do?

Donal O’Neill: Well, I mean, I think you’re doing a great job already. The work you’re doing is tremendous. I mean, it’s great to have guys like yourself who are clearly very savvy in the Internet environment, because we’re a David to an enormous Goliath and I the real foods message needs coordination and collaboration. And, you know, these types of podcasts and recordings and everything else you’re doing is enormously beneficial.

Obviously, we went with Yekra to distribute the movie because it enabled hosts like yourselves to present the movie for screening directly from your website and your Facebook page and whatnot.

So, we’ve been trying to get some viralality into the marketing of the movie, because our advertising budget is about zero. So, it’s, you know, not the cleverest thing in the world to launch a movie without a budget, but here we are.

But, you know, even if we had a couple of million dollars, it probably wouldn’t make that much of a difference because you’re operating against such a vast war chest on the other side that to break through is very, very tough. So, I think it’s just a question of continuing to tell the truth and to present the facts and get what success you can.

Guy Lawrence: I think the power of social media can be phenomenal, to, you know. And by getting bits of information out like this, and getting them out there, and people talking. You know, it certainly does make a difference to some people, that’s for sure.

Donal O’Neill: It definitely helps. Later today, I’m on with Ireland’s biggest commercial radio station, so that’s; but this is as important as that, it’s because this type of engagement that alerted mainstream media, because I told them all we were coming and they just completely ignored me.

So, you know, you’ve got to bite your lip and march on and try and make some noise and just wait for the pickup. So, thanks for supporting us.

Guy Lawrence: Oh, man. I think it’s awesome. I absolutely loved it.

We always end on a wrap-up question. And this can be non-nutrition related. What’s the single best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?

Donal O’Neill: “Don’t do it.”

When I hear that, that is just music to my ears. And I’m out of the blocks. And that’s probably the most consistent piece of advice I got when I started this project. So, that might sound negative but that’s when you know you’re either crazy or your might be onto something, when people are steadfast against what you’re doing, for no other reason than they can’t get their head around it.

But it’s starting to become a really good idea.

Stuart Cooke: It’s working for you. I’d keep at it.

Guy Lawrence: Just keep doing it. Keep doing it.

And for us Aussies, mate, how can we get more of Donal O’Neill? Where is the best place to go?

Donal O’Neill: Obviously, we’re on Facebook: CerealKillersMovie. We’ve got the website at CerealKillersMovie.com. And everything will kind of flow from those channels.

We put up a blog to support the movie called Let Fat By Thy Medicine. We have some articles up there. But we’re gonna just keep pushing the Internet presence and using some of the expertise I’ve picked up along the way in my days with the online gambling industry. So, yeah, it’s gonna be very much pumping the online channels. And I think we get the movie onto Netflix; iTunes, in due course and then we’re looking towards television.

But we are; we’re gonna try to pitch a TV show into Australia this year. So, we’ll see how that goes. But I just want to keep the projects coming and keep the message coming, because one movie isn’t gonna approve to much. It’s the start.

Guy Lawrence: Yeah, look, this movie needed to be made and you did an awesome job and we really appreciate your time for coming on the show. And we will be pushing this message constantly as well, man, and continuing to get it out there.

Donal O’Neill: Much, much appreciated, and thanks for having me.

Stuart Cooke: No problem. Thanks for joining us.

Guy Lawrence: No worries. Thank you, Donal.

Donal O’Neill: Cheers, guys.

Stuart Cooke: Thank you, mate.