Free Shipping To Australia & NZ For Orders Over $99
WOOCS 2.2.5

Brad Davidson – Wake Up, Take Back Your Health & Live Legendary

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Stu:  This week we welcome to the show Brad Davidson. Brad is the author of The Stark Naked 21 Day Metabolic Reset, and Creator of the nutrition program EatSleepRecover.com He is a highly respected nutrition and fitness expert, a world- renowned strength coach, and an international speaker on the topic of metabolism and performance enhancement.

Brad grew up in McMinnville, a small town in Oregon and moved to California in 1998 to pursue his passion for health and fitness. Today he has grown into a leading authority in helping high achieving executives, professional athletes, tactical athletes, and highly driven individuals to offset and optimize their insatiable need to push themselves beyond physical limits. In the last 3 years Brad has consulted for over 450 CEO’s, athletes from 28 professional teams, 10 First Round NFL Draft picks, 4 Miss California contestants, 9 top athletes from the Crossfit Games, and active tactical members from SWAT, SEB, and the Navy Seals.

Brad has recently been featured in Fast Company, Inc. Magazine, The New York Post, Details Magazine, Muscle & Fitness Magazine, Men’s Fitness Magazine, and Martha Stewart Living.

Audio Version

downloaditunesListen to Stitcher

Questions we ask in this episode:

  • How can we determine if our passion for health & fitness becomes an obsession?
  • What are the typical roadblocks that tend to hold us back from our health goals?
  • Can we change our metabolism or is it set for life?
  • How can ‘Type A’ personalities improve sleep quality?

Get More Of Brad Davidson

If you enjoyed this, then you’ll enjoy these interviews with

Leave a Comment

Full Transcript

Stu

[00:00:30] Hey, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition and welcome to another episode of The Health Sessions. It’s here that we connect with the world’s best experts in health, wellness and human performance in an attempt to cut through the confusion around what it takes to achieve a long lasting health. Before we get into the show today, you might not know that we make products too. That’s right. We’re into whole food nutrition, have a range of super foods and natural supplements to help support your day. If you’re curious, you want to find out more, jump over to 180nutrition.com.au and take a look. Okay. Back to the show.

[00:01:00] This week I am super excited to welcome Brad Davidson. Now Brad is an author, a performance coach, speaker and presenter and is an expert on the topic of metabolism. Brad wrote his bestselling book “Stark Naked 21-Day Metabolic Reset,” which has been the topic of conversation around our office for a while. Now he’s a super nice guy. We had a lot of fun in this episode and discussed among many things how so many of us get it wrong when thinking about diet and exercise and how doing less and eating more carbs could lead to better health. Now I guarantee you’ll get something out of this interview. I had a blast. Without further ado, let’s get into the show.

Hey, guys. This is Stu from 180 Nutrition, and I am delighted to welcome Brad Davidson to the show. Good morning, Brad. How are you?

Brad

Hey. I’m doing great. Thank you. So excited to be on this.

Stu

[00:02:00] We’ve just been inundated with emails and requests from our audience over here in Australia, they’re talking about “The Stark Naked 21-Day Metabolic Reset” book that seems to be causing a little bit of a stir over here as well. I dug deep and just had a little look what’s it’s all about, who’s this about and realized that you really got a really good story to tell. From your story, you’ve radically changed the way you do things and now you’re helping a whole heap of people. I would love, Brad, if you could perhaps just tell us a little bit about yourself, who you are, what you do and perhaps why you do it just to kick start.

Brad

[00:02:30] Yeah. Awesome. First off, I’m a husband, father of three, got my hands full. I’m a speaker now. I travel around the United States, Canada, get international a little bit here and there. Focused on the metabolism. I’m a big fan of energy. That’s my thing. I learned early on at 33 that if you lack energy, you lack life. It was interesting because my life, fitness and obsession with extreme fitness and extreme nutrition, I mean just wiped me up. Talk about a curve ball in life. I was obsessed on that. I love to work with people that are burned out, tired, have roadblocks in life. Just kind of lost that zest for life.

[00:03:00] I love to just restart that. I’m a big fan of helping people live a more fulfilled life is the big goal now.

Stu

[00:03:30] Well, you know what? That is so exciting. You are talking to me, like totally me, because about three years ago, I mean I’ve always been into health and nutrition, and voracious, and juggling lots of balls, and we’re running this busy company. I embraced CrossFit as well and just went healthy lather on CrossFit and loved it. I got my programming a little bit wrong in terms of didn’t give myself enough time to recover. I was doing wads in the evening and backing them up with wads in the morning, messing with my diet. I went super low carb at a time when I probably needed more carbohydrates. Burnt myself out completely. My sleep went to pot. I was tired and wired.

[0:04:00] I was watching TV at 10 o’clock at night and all of a sudden it’s almost like I just come out of a brawl room or like a bar fight. I was so wired and pumped. I was thinking, “What’s going on?” Couldn’t sleep. That led me down a rabbit hole to investigate and understand hormones and rest and recovery and all that kind of stuff. How can we determine then if our passion for like health, nutrition, fitness and all that kind of stuff becomes an obsession and can actually become damaging? Tell me about your story because you’ve done the same thing I guess.

Brad:

Yeah. I really think if it defines who you are. It defined who I was for a long time. At 32, I was training all these professional athletes. I’m like, “Man, I can hang with all these kids. I have the athletic abilities still with me. I train really well. I’m going to do something crazy and go out for a US Olympic team.” I chose bobsledding. All right? I don’t know why I chose that. I think it’s because as I was going through it like, “Wow. It takes no skill set. Just pure raw power, speed. You have to have a good vertical jump, a good 40 yard dash.” I was like, “Oh, I have all those things. I’m just way too light for it.” I tried out and I made the team. It was really cool.

[00:05:30] Over a 10 month period of time, I put on 52 pounds of lean muscle, and I’ll never forget one of my mentors .. I put on 10 yards on my vertical jump, I got my 40 down to a 44. I was a super freak at 33. I remember one of my mentors say, “Wow. This is incredible. What gear are you on?” I’m like, “What do you mean what gear am I on?” “What are you taking?” I’m like, “What do you mean what am I taking?” ” You don’t get this kind of result without being on gears, so just fess up. What are you taking?” I’m like, “I don’t even know what you’re talking about.” He’s like, “Steroids. What steroids are you on?” I’m like, “Oh my gosh.” I knew at that point I must be in trouble.

[00:06:00] He’s like, “I thought you were on steroids. I’m giving you all these protocols that I would give someone on steroids and you’re surviving it.” At that point I thought, “Oh yeah. I’m hot stuff, right? I got the willpower. I can grind.” Everything seemed fine until I had a little girl and all of a sudden 90 miles an hour on tin can just seemed like a really bad idea. People die doing that. I remember going up back up at Lake Placid, took one run, faked a hamstring injury. Athletes, if you need to fake an injury, it’s the best one to fake. They can’t prove it. They just can’t prove it. MRIs. In bobsledding, you’re not getting back on a bobsled.

[00:06:30] I won’t lie. I was a scrub on the team. I was good enough to be there. Definitely had no chance in making the Olympic team. There are still people on the Olympic team that I started with literally on the same day. It was cool to watch. After I hung it up, within two weeks I fell apart. As soon as all the stress went away and the training demand of six days a week went away, my body just collapsed. I can’t even get out of bed. I had no drive for life, no sex drive. I looked great on the outside, but I had no desire to drive to do anything. There’s hair falling out of my face. My wife’s saying, “You need to go see a doctor. This is weird.”

I went and saw a doc. He’s like, “Dude, you’re screwed. I don’t know what you did. I look at you on the inside and you’re like the epitome of health, but you’re pretty much diabetic.” I’m like there’s no way I’m diabetic. I haven’t had a carb in like 10 months. There’s no way. He’s like, “I don’t care. You’re diabetic. Your thyroid’s shut down. You have the testosterone levels of an 85 year old sick man.” I was like, “I got to be sick.” He said, “Well, I got 85 year old men with higher testosterone levels than you do. You’re a train wreck.” At that time it was 2008, summer of 2008, he’s like, “Look, you’re an andropause. Like male menopause.”

[00:07:30] I’m like this cannot be male menopause. I mean look at me. I’m shredded. This is ridiculous. He’s like, “I don’t know what to tell you.” That kind of started my whole journey, this idea of wow, you can look great on the outside and be absolutely destroyed on the inside. Back then there was no strategy, no education on how to recover from that. Everywhere I go would be like, “Oh, just clean up your diet.” Finally, I did a podcast with Robb Wolf. I asked him like, “What did I do wrong?” He’s like, “Oh man. You misread my book.” I’m like, “Man, I’ve read it three times. I didn’t misread it.”
[00:08:00] He’s like, “I didn’t write the book for you. You can have the 600 grams of carbs a day. You have a whole different problem and the only way you’re going to win and protect your metabolism is to eat a bunch of carbs. It’s the best way to control the stress hormone and that’s what’s beating you.” I was like oh my gosh. That was like the first step in the recovery process. I brought carbs back into my diet. I immediately started feeling better. At that point I realized okay, this is the avenue I’m going to down. I’m going to figure this out, and then I’m going to start coaching other high achievers do this process. Fast forward today, that’s really what I’m doing now.

Stu

Fantastic. Wow. So many of those points hit home. It’s not funny. What are the telltale signs perhaps then that we might experience way before we get to the issues that you see? What is it? Is it sleep? Energy? How do we tell?

Brad

[00:09:00] It’s tricky because it’s the things we think we have to grind through to be great. It’s the moodiness, the tired, the needing an extra two or three coffees a day, the disrupted sleep. Cravings is a big one. I think the early signs is mood. You become very irritable, very short tempered, and you get frustrated very easily. You’re desire for exercise has diminished. It’s like this willpower. Like this is where I become great because I’m going to push myself. I remember hearing it with I was younger, the day the other guy goes home and goes back to bed is the day you go hit and train harder than anyone else. That’s how you become great.

[00:09:30] If you’re willing yourself into the gym, we got a big problem. As a coach, I’m telling my clients, “I should be your brakes, not your gas pedal. If I’m forcing you and I’m dragging you to the gym, we got a big problem. You’re crashing. I should be holding you back and begging you to take more rest is what I’m looking for now.”

Stu

Right. Of course. It makes perfect sense. What did you do? You’re in this state like you look shredded, you think you’re doing the right stuff, but your doctor says you’re screwed inside. What’s the first thing that you did?

Brad

[00:10:00] The first time I got super depressed. I walked out of his office with blood sugar meds, thyroids meds and testosterone injections because I was screwed. I walked in thinking I have this really good grasp on high performance living and I walked out thinking what did I do? I am so pathetic. I have such bad genes that I can’t even handle it. I’m 33. I got really depressed. I stopped everything. I was a horrible person to be around. I’m not going to lie. I lost my body. I just went to garbage. I stopped training. Everything. That was the honest truth. One day I woke up and I was just like, “Okay, no more. I can’t live my life like this. I don’t want to be this role model for my little girl.”

[00:11:00] I actually wrote a story about ninja persuasion from a guy named Brendon Burchard. It talked all about the power of your habits. That what the people you love the most are picking up on are the habits you’re not talking about. I’m like, “Oh my gosh. Here I am crushing coffee and sodas and candy bars, not caring.” She was picking it up. That was kind of the day where I was like, “Okay, I’m going to fix this. I’m going to take on this challenge,” and that was when I found out … Talked to Robb and realized, “Oh my gosh. I screwed this all up.” I started realizing the damage of exercise nobody’s talking about.

I had heard about it. I remember Charles Poliquin would say, “Fatigue masks fitness.” You hear it all the time, but you don’t think about it.

Stu

No. No. You’re right.

Brad

[00:11:30] It was hard because it defined me. I thought because I was in such great shape, I can out train everybody, I ate perfect that I was like this superior human being. Reality was I was just killing myself in a different way. I had to kind of over the last six years just relearned who I was, relearned what was important to me, why do I need to do it because I just realized, “Wow, I look great, but I feel horrible.” I see that a lot in the CrossFit realm. I see a lot of high level crossfitters. They look incredible. They have the willpower to push, but you get a hold of their blood chemistry and start digging deeper, they’re absolute train wrecks that just need to be rebooted.

Stu

[00:12:00] That’s interesting that you raise that for CrossFit too because we’re closely connected with CrossFit in terms of what we do. We got some ambassadors onboard. I used to embrace it and we competed in the open right down here. I always looked to that from a hormonal level in terms of the young guns that were absolutely crushing it, had hormones on their side, right? Their hormones would just take care of them where me, like the old guy, I’m 45 now, and my hormones aren’t working for me anymore. They’re working against me. They keep me up at night. They store extra pounds here and there.

[00:12:30] I’m very, very intrigued to see what will happen in maybe 15 years time when all these young guns are now in their 40s. How are they going to feel?

Brad

[00:13:00] They’re going to be train wrecks because a lot of them didn’t want to pick it up. They don’t want to buy into this idea that I got to rest. Every athlete I work with is like that. I love all sport, right? I mean people would argue like, “Oh, CrossFit’s bad.” I’m like, “That’s BS. It’s a great sport.” If you love to compete in it, like go running marathons are super bad. You’re going to tell that? I put on a football helmet and go play on the NFL is super bad or putting gloves on and beating the crap out of each other in the UFC ring, really bad. Nobody complained about that. It’s a sport. It’s what I love to do.

[00:13:30] It’s like, “Okay. Look, here is the sport. Here’s the risk. Here’s the things you have to watch out for and here is the strategy you have to apply to keep you performing at the highest level possible as long as you want.” It’s the same thing. It’s like okay, if you don’t apply a good strategy to recover, if you don’t manage that and make sure you’re not training …” Nobody can train hard every given day. The body cannot do it. I’ve been studying a lot of HRV. Joel Jamieson has this cool tool out called Morpheus now. Has a little artificial intelligence built on it that I’ve been playing around with. Nobody can handle balls to the wall all out every single day.

We think we can. The physiology can’t. The problem is is that by the time you crash and you feel it, you’re way too late. You’ve dug yourself a pretty deep grave. You got to build that up. It’s just a matter of applying the right strategies.

Stu

[00:14:30]
Got it. Got it. Recovery is super important. We interviewed Mark Sisson, Primal Blueprint. Stellar guy. Looks amazing for what he’s doing. I think he said you don’t get fitter, stronger and faster in the gym. You get fitter, stronger and faster at recovering from the gym. Are there any principles or strategies that you would see as ultimately were super important in terms of recovery? That maybe well, on your recovery days you do nothing or it could be on your recovery days let’s do some yoga, let’s roll out, let’s think about some important supplements, things like that.

Brad

[00:15:00] You got to use strategy. Doing nothing I found a lot of times can make the situation worse. The body likes to move, but it likes low level aerobic activity type of stuff or walking. I like my clients to do that. On my recovery days, the first thing I do, I wake up. I go for a nice long walk outside. Then I like to do something active, either I’ll do like a float tank. It’s probably my ultimate favorite or acupuncture. Like stress-based acupuncture is really great. In the wintertime in my backyard I have a pool that I never turn the heater on, and then I have a hot tub. I’ll do cold dips. I’ll do contrast. You should do something.

I’ve found over time what works best for me by looking at HRV. My HRV tanks. I apply the strategies for the day. The next day it should come up dramatically. It’s what I’ve learned over time. Cold exposure is much better for me than hot exposure. It’s interesting.

Stu

How do you measure your HRV? What tools do you use for that?

Brad

[00:16:00] Right now I use a couple different ones. I’m playing around with Joel Jamieson’s Morpheus. I get that. I also use the Oura Ring. I like all the data it all pulls together. Basically the Oura Ring can dump into my health app on my Apple, and then Morpheus can take that data, and then it gives me structured ideas on what heart rate range I can handle for that given. Like what’s going to help me perform at a better level. I’m kind of playing right now with all that stuff trying to find the ultimate tool to use to say … Because I think we can train really hard, really aggressively if we were doing really good things around it to enhance the recovery of it.

[00:16:30] Then there’s days where the body just gives up and that’s the day you got to be smart and stay out of the gym and become really aggressive with what you do. Some of the athletes, some of the NFL guys will come out and they’ll get massages twice a week and chiropractic treatment twice a week. It’s like you’re spending five grand a month on therapy. You don’t need that much, right? It’s like super overkill. That’s real. It’s like, “Oh my gosh. You don’t need that much therapy.” You only really need a therapy on the days you’re in the tank to bring you back up to a higher performing level.

Stu

[00:17:00] Got it. That data is key as well because you might for instance have a crappy night sleep, but still feel okay in the morning. You haven’t hit those deeper phases where all the processes haven’t triggered and consolidated and all that stuff. You could go in and attack dead lifts and squats and God knows what and wreck yourself. Getting the data definitely helps.

Brad: I like it because I’ve noticed that I can’t feel it. I can’t tell you morning by morning what my HRV is going to be, what my readiness is going to be. What I found is that my Morpheus tool and my Oura Ring they both have readiness for activity scores. They’re pretty accurate. If one’s low, the other is low. If one’s good, the other is good I’m finding.

Stu

Okay. It’s good to know. You’ve coined the phrase “live legendary” and I like that because nobody can contest that, right? Everybody wants that. What have you found are the fundamental principles to be able to do that?

Brad

[00:18:00] First off, you got to know why you’re alive, right? There’s got to be some big component of why you’re doing what you’re doing on a daily basis. I even take it a little bit further as to say why are you taking care of your health and fitness? Why is this important. If it’s about how you look and that’s how you are ranking yourself in the world, “Oh, I look really good and so I’m better than everyone else,” you’re only one car accident away from losing it all. I lost that. I remember even thinking, “If I was smarter, if I was better looking, if I had better looking body, I would be more valuable to the world.” It’s like all these if only’s.

[00:18:30] Well, I had to kind of get the rug pulled out of me in life and kind of have nothing left to hold onto, but taking care of myself to realize this is the greatest tool we have for ourselves, how we eat, how we exercise. These are gifts we give ourselves, yet our world has said, “Your body sucks. You have to abuse it. You have to sacrifice it. You have to starve it. You have to force it to change.” It’s never going to work. What happens when you follow that process, you’re the farthest thing from living legendary. You’re the worst person to be around. You have no drive. No sex drive. You’re miserable. You’re irritable. You’re grumpy. Nobody wants to talk to you.

[00:19:30] That is not living legendary to me. A couple things I have put in the plate. Number one, my why is that when I get home at night, I have enough energy so that my three year old gets the best of me. Everybody’s leaving their best self at work. I take such great care of myself that my best self shows up at 5 o’clock in the evening. As soon as I get off this podcast, I’m going inside and my little guy and I we wrestle. We sword fight. We run. We play. We go to the playground and daddy’s on the playground doing the monkey bars, having a great time. That’s living legendary to me, that I’m giving my little one a great experience of life.

[00:20:00] That’s what I want. That’s what I want. I want to live life to the fullest. I think taking great care of yourself leads to that. It leads to better sleep, better mood, people like you more, better sex. You can’t argue that one. The better your health, the better you take care of yourself, the better that gets. That’s fun. That makes for a better life, right? When I show up to meet with people, I have the energy to engage and connect. It’s amazing when I walk around, especially in the United States, people are tired and checked out. They’re miserable.

I just see these miserable feeling people, and they don’t want to exercise because they’re like, “Oh, I don’t want to do that. That’s too hard. That’s silly.” Yeah, you know what? It is silly. The way we’ve been led to believe? It’s silly, but when you realize, “Oh, I do these things, I take better care of myself, I have better energy, I connect better, I love better.” Everything is so much better at that standpoint.” That’s what I want to give people back is that reignition of energy to live a better life. It’s that simple.

Stu

How do you start the process because there’s obviously a lot to check off then on the journey to better health? What do we do to start?

Brad

[00:21:00] I mean if you’re serious with it, you got to do some deep emotional work. Not weird funky stuff. Just like take a little time and write down what’s important to me, why do I need to have more energy, who’s not getting the best of me in my life. What’s sad is that so often it’s the family. They get the last little bit, the worst of you, when you get home at night. You got to start realizing like, “Okay. What’s important to me? Who deserves my best energy? What’s most important in my life? What are the things that I do for myself that are fun that I love to do?” That’s a great question to ask yourself because most people have forgotten all about that.

[00:21:30] Jeez, I don’t even know what I do for fun anymore. I ask a lot of time, “What can you do for yourself in the next month that’s fun? Just what you would like to do?” It’s like, “God, I don’t even know what my hobbies are anymore.” I went through that. I totally lost myself in work thinking that was the most important thing, and all of a sudden it’s like oh, I sell my business and now I’m like, “I don’t even know what I like to do anymore. I don’t even know what I do for fun.” I had to go relearn all that stuff. I tell people who needs you most, who needs your energy the most, and what’s most important to you in regards to you re-fulfilling yourself, not work, right? Not that stuff.

I’m talking like what makes your life great? What’s the stuff you’re going to remember on your death bed? I guess that’s the best way to put it. Some just shut down life and they’re just surviving and grinding thinking it’s going to come some day.

Stu

Yeah. I think so. It’s all about the purpose, isn’t it? The higher purpose. What do we actually want? Why are we doing this? Otherwise, you get caught in the grind.

Brad

[00:22:30] Yeah. So many people are exercising and eating certain ways in hopes that they’re going to change how they look and they’ll be more loved, they’ll have more friends, life will be so much better, and that’s one of the biggest lies our industry provides people. If you just look better, you’ll be more important in this world. People will love you more. You’ll be more attractive. You’ll have more sex. Oh, that’s the biggest BS line there is in my opinion. I mean shoot. I get too lean and my wife’s like, “Get away from me. I feel fat next to you,” right? That’s how it works.

Stu

That’s the line that sells products essentially.

Brad

[00:23:00] It is. That’s the thing I walked away from the industry for a while and now I’m coming back at it because I want to fight that because that lie is robbing the greatness that comes from taking better care of yourself. I have crazy energy in the evenings with my kids because I work out, I eat the right foods at the right time, I go to bed, I take the supplements, I do all the things because it gives me more energy. I stopped caring about how I looked. You know what’s funny is once I did that, I probably look better now than I ever had. I really don’t care. You’ll never see me with my shirt off because it’s just not important.

Man, when I can wrestle for three hours with my kids and win and want more and wife has to call timeout for us to all go to bed, that’s awesome to me.

Stu

So good. So good. Tell me your thoughts around outdated fitness advice because I know there’s a huge amount of confusion out there in terms of do I need to pound the streets and just run, run, run? Is good advice swinging kettle bells? Do I do CrossFit? What do I do? How can you clear up that confusion about what perhaps will be the best way to move?

Brad

[00:24:30] I think first and foremost, fitness has a purpose in regards to helping you move better in life. Fitness was originally created to help you be stronger, add more muscle mass, move better in life in general. That’s what I like to use it for is to train in ways that make me better at what I want to do in life. It keeps me moving well. It keeps me mobile well, keeps me strong, keeps my muscle mass on. I think those two are most important because there’s some good prediction of longevity. Tufts University has shown those are the top two predictions of longevity. The problem is people have no plan in place. They just go and do something to do it.

If they’re laid out in a pool of sweat, ready to throw up, they’ve done a great workout. If they’re not there, they didn’t work out hard enough. It’s like gosh, some of my best workouts I don’t even sweat. There’s a guy I’ve been studying in Huntington Beach at KILO. His name is Stephan. I can’t remember how to pronounce his last name, but the guy’s epic. I’ve been studying under him for the last 13-14 months now. There are a lot of times I walk out the gym’s like, “Gosh, I didn’t even sweat, but my body is working so well right now.”

[00:25:00] I think that’s the biggest lie is you got to train yourself to the point that you’re ready to puke and be laid out on the ground and then have somebody take a picture of you when you’re laid out on the ground. I think that’s the biggest lie there is. I think that this idea there’s of no structure and progression, like this whole muscle confusion stuff and just slam yourself with all kind of crazy different things all the time. Research is pretty clear that your body progresses really well being exposed to workouts multiple times and allowing the progression to happen before you go change everything.

[00:25:30] I think a lot of people miss that great strategy of look, do the same workout for three weeks or so and then change it and progress within the workouts and document and track. Because here’s the funny part is I think a great trainer should be at the end of the year be able to say, “Okay. You made this much gain and strength in this exercise. You made this much gain and strength in this exercise and this exercise.” They can’t tell you that. Most trainers at the end of the year cannot tell you if you actually got stronger or better from the last year of training. They have no data to prove it.

Stu

Got it.

Brad

[00:26:30]
They have no data to show like oh gosh, your bench press is strong. Your overhead press is weak. Your squat is good. Your front squat’s horrible. They just have no data to say, “Oh, did any of this get any better?” Everybody is basing it off of body fat. Did you drop body fat? I think that’s probably one of the least important components of fitness is losing the body fat. I have found with the people that I work with that the highest levels of performance, a lot of times you get too lean, it dramatically impacts performance. A lot of athletes and people will go into performance super lean, they tank. They go put on a little body fat on and they perform much better.

That’s one of the biggest things that I struggle with is that being lean doesn’t equal better performance.

Stu

That’s fascinating. I think about the reasons why I train. I like to lift weights. It just makes me feel good.

Brad

I love it. I’m right there with you.

Stu

[00:27:30] For me if I lift weights … I lifted weights today. I got up early because we’ve got podcast today. I go in. I like to lift heavy weights really slowly. I just concentrate. I find that it makes me a better person throughout the day. I feel better. I know I’m getting stronger because I track my stuff. I’m getting older, but I want to be stronger. It helps me sleep as well. It improves for me just digestion, and the body just seems to work better. That’s why I do it. I just find that I don’t get aches and pains and I’m mobile. It works for me. I’m guessing yeah, like you said, figure out why you’re doing it for one.

Figure out a way to track it and just keep doing it if it’s making you feel much better as well.

Brad

[00:28:00] I’m not like you have to train this way. I don’t believe there’s a best way to train. I just don’t. There is no science to validate this is the best way to train for everybody. It just doesn’t exist. I tell people just find something you love that makes you feel good, that helps you live a better life. Track it. Document it. Make sure you’re progressing in it and switch it up a little bit. My wife is a marathon runner. I’m a sprinter. We’re drastically different people. The stuff she likes to do is so different than what I love to do. I don’t pick on her and tell her you’re wrong, I’m not right. I will not let her tell me that she’s right and I’m wrong, right?

It’s what I like about this world of exercise is like find what works for you. Find what you love, that you crave to do, and then just track it and make sure you’re getting better at it.

[00:28:30]

Stu

Yeah, no. That makes so much sense. I love that phrase “find out what you love to do, do more of it everyday.”

Brad

Yeah. You know it’s working if you do it and you come out of it and you’re energized and you function better in life afterwards. If you’re doing it and you come out and you’re ruined for the rest of the day, you’re overreaching, you’re overdoing it. It’s not working very well.

Stu

[00:29:00] Got it. Getting back to your book, “The Stark Naked 21‑Day Metabolic Reset,” we had a whole heap of emails about this, “Look, what do you think about the book? Can you get this guy on the podcast,” because I’m using the protocols and the principles and it’s really working for me. I wondered if you could tell me just a little bit about it, what we can expect from the book.

Brad

[00:29:30] Yeah. It was quite an amazing journey. I got approached by HarperCollins. They loved who I worked with. At one point I was working with all these professional athletes, celebrities. It was really fun. I got approached. It’s like, “What are you doing?” I laid out a plan for them. It’s like a 90-day plan. They’re like, “Well, this is great, but nobody wants a 90-day plan. It’s got to be 30 days or less,” and I’m like, “I don’t know if that’s possible.” “If you want a book, you’ll do it.” Three months later I turned in a 30-day plan and they’re like, “Yeah. That’s old news. Now it’s 21 days or less.”

Stu

Oh boy.

Brad

[00:30:00] You cannot turn somebody’s life around in 21 days or less. “Well, if you want a book deal, you’ll figure it out.” I said, “Okay. Fine.” I just went back to all my data with all my people. I’m like oh wow. What jumped out of at me was my professional athletes, men and women, year after year they had always get the best results, but the one thing I did different with them was that I would have them take a break from exercise and just rest and recover, and go on vacation, and stay out of the gym for the first month after season.

[00:30:30] Yet my executives, my mob, like these people who believe like, “I can’t even take a week off of exercise,” asking them to take a time off like, “Oh, you’re crazy. I can’t do that.” I realize oh wow, so that clicked. I’m like okay, what did I do different with them? I do things in that month where I’d support their liver. I would support their adrenals. I’d rebuild their adrenals. I make sure their gut health was good. I make sure that I was doing things that they were sleeping and their blood sugar was in check. Literally they have some structure on the nutrition. I’d ask them to do lots of rest, lots of therapy, like go on vacation.

[00:31:00] It was awesome. I started building that in. Just some of my mentors that I’ve had, like this guy, his name is Will, mycellcoach.com I believe is his website. He taught me a ton looking at the blood under a microscope. Dr. Jade Teta. I just started taking all the data I learned from all these people and I said, “Okay.” I couldn’t use any supplements was the other best part. No supplements. No supplements. No labs. It has to be 21 days.

Stu

Oh wow.

Brad

[00:31:30] Just take away all my tools. I created this plan, and I turned it in. They’re like, “Okay. Great. Well, does it work?” I’m like, “I don’t know.” “You got to go test it.” I got 350 real estates agents. They’re super high stressed people. I had them test it, and they crushed it. I remember coming in it was like, “Well, how much weight am I going to lose on this?” I’m like, “I don’t really know.” “I better lose weight. I better lose weight.” Then you get to the end of it and then all of a sudden I started getting these responses of, “I can’t believe the energy I have. I can’t believe the brain clarity I have. I can’t believe the drive I have. I can’t believe how good I’m sleeping.”

[00:32:00] I literally had to ask, “Well, how much weight did you lose?” “Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Oh, I forgot all about that.” The average was 12 pounds in three weeks. I thought it was so funny that going in it was all about weight loss. Coming out it was all about energy, mood, productivity, brain clarity. People just didn’t realize like, “Oh, I take care of myself. all these things come back.” It was great. One caveat was then was you can’t exercise during this. I believe you guys had Ruth Anderson-Horrell on here before, right?

Stu

Yeah. She’s an ambassador for us.

Brad

[00:32:30] She’s one of my favorite people on the face of the earth. Ruth called me one time from the gym floor. She wasn’t making progress, getting fat, like super frustration like, “I’m done. I’ll do whatever you say to do.” I said, “Okay. You’re going to do my reset. For three weeks, you’re going to cut back exercise.” She’s like, “What?” I’m like, “We’re just going to rebuild you.” I said, “For the first week, you can do nothing but walk outside. Then after that we’ll add in twice a week of training.” She was, “I have a competition at the end of the three weeks. I can’t do that.” I said, “Well, if you want to perform well, you will.”

[00:33:00] She does it. She literally goes and like crushes the competition after doing nothing. It’s like all of a sudden her fitness came back because the fatigue was gone, but the whole system is all about recovery and rest and just rejuvenating the metabolism. It really deals with the areas that high stressed people beat on their metabolism, the adrenals, the liver, gut health and blood sugar. The difference with the blood sugar scenario is what I learned from Robb Wolf is that higher stressed people have to have carbs every single day. What happens is at the end of everyday, people have carbs with dinner.

[00:33:30] It goes against so much of what’s out there, but it brings the stress response down so people hit deeper sleep, better sleep. They start regenerating better. They start recovering better and go from there. What I do in the morning is I just really support and extend the liver detoxification because people just have really congested livers.

Stu

How do you do that? What do you use to support the liver?

Brad

[00:34:00] Again it had to be with no supplements. I found everything I could find naturally. They wake up in the morning. They put half a lemon in warm lemon water. Then from there they go to a specific type of smoothie that has no protein. The reason we take the protein out so the liver doesn’t have to deal with breaking that down. It’s just fruits, some vegetables like greens, some good fats and some liquid. That supports detoxification. Then we do a water down cranberry water or cranberry juice. It’s kind of like a modified intermittent fast. Low calorie, high nutrient, using food to extend the detoxification window.

[00:34:30] If I’m working with clients, we’ll add supplementation into that to make it even more aggressive. Things like milk thistle would work. I like to use Liver Cleanse by Thorne. I don’t know if you guys have access to Thorne out there in Australia, but we just add those things into the morning routine. I’ve recently started adding a teaspoon of honey with the lemon water. I found it feeds the liver and allows a little more detoxification to happen. It’s pretty cool.

Stu

Fantastic.

Brad

[00:35:00] I came about it on accidental. I’m not going to lie. I was forced into it. I would have never seen it if I wasn’t forced into it by my publisher to come up with a solution like that, and I’m so glad they did that to me because it totally changed the direction of what I do with everybody now.

Stu

Mate, it sounds fantastic. We’ve got a copy of the book coming our way because I want to read it.

Brad

Oh cool.

Stu

I certainly want to understand exactly what you’re doing. Does the book hope to change our metabolism or work with our existing metabolism?

Brad

[00:35:30] Well, I wanted to bring the existing metabolism back online. I got some haters out there that will say, “You cannot change the metabolism. That’s a bunch of BS, blah, blah, these metabolic lifestyle things.” I’m like say whatever you want. Try it first and then if you don’t feel different after 21 days, fine. It didn’t work for you. I did have somebody go through it and not be like, “Wow. I feel way better. Like I noticed a difference because I sleep better.” It’s not changing the metabolism. It’s just cleaning up a gunked up metabolism. Let’s say for instance, if you liver is congested, that’s responsible for 600 metabolic activities a day.

[00:36:30] If it’s congested, if it’s backed up, if it’s sluggish, your metabolism is not going to work as well as it could. In fact, metabolism is going to be off. Hormones are going to be off. I mean it’s just how it is. If we can do things to support it and get it caught up on its job, your brain is going to work better, your fat metabolism is going to work better, blood sugar metabolism is going to work better, hormones are going to be better. It’s pretty fascinating. We get that into check. We get your adrenals back on your side. There’s just stop them from being on overdrive. People are just stuck in this high stressed state and they just can’t shut it down.

[00:37:00] There’s just never this recovery. Joel Jamieson really talks about it well in a lot of his new articles he just written. It’s like you have a finite amount of energy. The first bit goes to all the organs like lungs and heart. If those don’t get energy, you die. Then from there it goes to dealing with all the stress of your life. Exercise is included in that. Anything that’s left after that then rolls over to basically help with adapting the fitness, laying down new muscle tissue, all that process. If you’re not getting results from your exercise, it means that your energy is off. You’re wasting. Too much stress.

Another big component of the book is just to decompress stress. That’s why I ask people to stop exercising for the three weeks.

Stu

Yeah, right. Huge stress, right?

Brad

It’s a big stressor. It’s a big pile of stress. You’re trashed. It’s not going to help you.

Stu

[00:37:30] Yeah. Took you over the edge. I’m going to ask you a question now, type A personalities. This is going to be a personal question as well. Improving sleep quality for type A personalities. What are your thoughts?

Brad

[00:38:00] First off, I read this great comment in a book I’m reading. To all the type A personalities out there, there is not one study out there that validates sleep deprivation is good for you. It does nothing for you. It’s affecting you negatively somehow, some way whether it’s cognitive performance, energy. It’s getting you somewhere. Maybe you’re going to die young, but it’s getting you. You have to sleep. There’s a couple of different strategies I found. I work with a lot of CEOs, and I travel around speaking to groups of CEOs and C-suite groups. We got to shut the brain down because that thing just goes. It just goes and goes and goes.

[00:38:30] I found this to work the best. I’ll have them set a timer for 60 seconds, write down the three most important things they have to do. That tends to slow the spins of I’m worried about trying to forget whether or not … They’re trying to remember. I can’t remember who taught me that, but that was really effective. Then from there I have them write down three to five things they’re thankful for to ship subconscious from all the possible bad to what’s good. That typically shuts it down, but I’ve gone one step further, Tim Ferriss talked about this, The Power of Tetris if you’re still is still spinning. I’ll go through those two things, and then I’ll have people ..

[00:39:00] It’s the one time I ask them to look at their phone. I’ll have them play Tetris for 10 minutes. That typically will just settle the brain down dramatically. I’ll do that to settle the brain down. Environment is really important. We all hear about that. Super dark, nice and cold, that’s really important. That’s where I bring a big pile of carbs into dinner. I typically have a guy your size eating about 120 grams of carbs. It’s a lot of carbs, but that brings the stress response down. I do like to use little snacks before bed to help with that. It could either be full fat Greek yogurt or some fruit. That can help calm people down. Another one, a client of mine brought his super ADD.

[00:39:30] He’s like, “Have you ever heard of this?” It was a spoonful of honey, a spoonful of coconut oil and a pinch of sea salt, mix it up, and eat it? At this point, I’ve been working with the guy for eight years, he never slept. I’m like, “Try it. Tell me what happens.” It was the home run. I call that one the hammer. I don’t even know where he got it from, but it works. Then if I’m going to use supplementation, I’m a really big fan of magnesium. I like magnesium glycinate forms. I find that to be the best to help people fall asleep. The one I personally use is Magnesium Bisglycinate by Thorne. It’s a really good product.

[00:40:00]

Stu

[00:40:30]
Fantastic. It’s funny you mentioned the carbs as well because I have … Ever since I crashed and burned with CrossFit years ago, my sleep went out of whack. Running my own business as well, you never really switch off. You’re always juggling stuff, always thinking. I liken my brain to looking in a shop window that sells TVs, and there’s TVs stacked on top of each other. 20 TVs. Every TV is playing a different channel. That’s my brain. I’m thinking of this. I’m thinking of that. Now I’m thinking of something else. I’ve worked extensively on my sleep. I have got it round, but I have a meal that consistently provides me with the best sleep.

[00:41:00] It’s a big grass-fed steak, a huge jacket potato with guacamole on it and then a truck load of greens, and cover the whole thing in olive oil. That consistently gives me better sleep than anything else that I eat during that week.

Brad

That’s awesome.

Stu

I completely support what you’re saying about it.

Brad

[00:41:30] That’s awesome. I love it. I just can’t tell you how many athlete careers I’ve saved especially in the CrossFit world. I got to a point with crossfitters, I wouldn’t work with them until they went three days and just ate nothing but carbs. That was their ticket into talk to me. Nothing but carbs in the next three days. If you’ll do that, I’ll talk to you. If you’re not willing to do that, I’m not going to talk to you because I needed them to feel the impact and power of good carbs. It was awesome. It was awesome.

Stu

[00:42:00] It’s amazing, isn’t it, because we’re in a society right now that carbs are the enemy or you could read that certainly. A lot of people are pulling the carbs right out of their diet, but of course that might not work with our physiology. We’re also radically different. It just didn’t work with me at all. I’ve got a very, very high metabolism. I had all my DNA tested. I’ve been told, ” Don’t go low carb because you’ll switch on inflammatory markers in your body.” I tested that and yes, I switched them all on. Like all went pear shaped.

Brad: I’m just like you. I do not function well on low carb diets. I thought I did because it made me look better on the outside, but I was an emotional train wreck, super anxiety ridden. It was crazy how bad I was mentally, emotionally without even realizing it because I was so focused on how I looked.

Stu

Totally. I went super low carb for a couple of months and I had veins running over my stomach. I’ve dropped every ounce of fat on me, and I don’t have a lot of fat, but boy, did I feel bad.

Brad

I don’t know about you, but did your brain just go psycho crazy? Like just would spin just crazy? I remember just laying in bed with like adrenaline. I just couldn’t sleep.

Stu

[00:43:00] Totally. Yeah, absolutely. I’d be switched on at 10 o’clock at night and I couldn’t switch off. I just thought, “What on earth am I doing?” Of course, you go further down into the rabbit hole and you start to understand exactly what happened and you think, “Right. Okay. Maybe I should just personalize this information to me and not take everything that I’m told at heart.”

Brad

[00:43:30] I tell people all the time like explore what you want, but just know this, you couldn’t pay me to go on a keto diet or no carb diet anymore. There’s not enough money in the world that would be worth me going on one of those diets for how it makes me feel. I say that for people to realize like there’s not the one right answer for everybody. I know like there’s these crazes that roll, like this is the answer. What I joke around and I tell people like … I become very clear with the people I’ve got to talk to is that most these nutrition plans are for sick and lazy people with no stress.

If you’re that person who’s lazy and you have no stress, cut your carbs. The carbs are probably killing you. As soon as you bring stress to the table and then if you throw exercise on top of it, carbs become your best friend when eaten at the right times.

Stu

Yes. Yeah, well, that’s right. Carb timing can be very, very important. I’m a type A personality, right? I’m up in the morning super early. I’m juggling emails and exercise and the stresses of work. How would you recommend that I time my carbohydrates?

Brad

[00:45:00] I do it like this. If you’re lean, all the meals before your workout, no carbs. All the meals after your workout, carbs have with it. Like for myself personally, I sit around 10-12% body fat. The days I work out where I lift intensely, I will have carbs in my shake after I workout. I do either a vegan protein powder or like an amino acid mix with like a potato starch-based carbs, like UCAN, ATP LAB out of Canada is another one I use, and then I’ll have carbs at dinner. The days that I don’t workout hard, I’ll just have carbs at dinner. I typically play with that with people. It’s all those carbs at dinner because I wanted to bring them down and help them fall asleep.

Throughout the day, like my pro athletes, like they’re no carbs up to lunch and then a ton of carbs after lunch. They train around 10 o’clock, 11 o’clock in the morning. That’s typically when I have those guys do that. I found it worked the best for me. Again everybody’s a little different, but I found the more exercise you do, the more you need, the leaner you are, the more you need from a performance standpoint.

Stu

[00:45:30] Brilliant. The thing that I like about this is that the overall goal is living legendary, right, like you say. You want to feel awesome. It’s not just solely focused on fat loss. It’s not focused on gains in the gym. It’s about feeling amazing to truly live your life as we should be.

Brad

[00:46:00] Honestly, nothing frustrates me more than when somebody comes back and says, “My energy is great. My sleep is great. I used to be constipated. I go to the bathroom normally now. I’m really fun to be around, but the program is not working because I’m not losing enough weight.” Like holy cow. Did you just hear yourself? You were miserable. Your life sucked, and now you’re back, but because you only lost six pounds in the last month, the program’s no good? Let’s talk about this. Give me a freaking break. Then go somewhere else if all you care about is the weight loss because that’s not what I’m about.

I gave you what you needed and what you wanted, but because the stupid scale read the wrong number, it didn’t work? Give me a break. That’s silly.

Stu

[00:47:00]
Absolutely. I don’t know how you feel about this, but I do have a belief that we have a setpoint personally. Irrespective of where we want to be, our body generally comes back to that setpoint. For me, I’m lean. I’m always going to be lean. I cannot put on weight for the life of me, and I’ve tried through forced feeding. Yeah, I can put a few kilos on, but two days later it’s gone. Perhaps there should be an acceptance at some level that I’m never going to be superman. I’m never going to be this little shredded nugget. It’s all about feeling good and living life. Live legendary. Absolutely.

Brad

I love that word because it’s …

Stu

That’s what we all aspire to.

Brad

[00:47:30] It’s a more fulfilled life. It’s just a better life and that’s why we’re doing it in the first place. That is why we’re exercising and eating because we want a better life from it. It’s just the reality is it comes when you have great energy and that’s what matters most, to have that better life. You’re more attractive to be around when you have more energy. It doesn’t matter what your abs look like. It’s what do you feel like, what’s your energy levels like. Are you fun? Are you engaged? Are you exciting, right? It’s that reality.

Stu

[00:48:00] It is totally. Totally. You touched on supplementation there. I’m guessing throughout the metabolic reset, it’s going to be more about whole foods and liver cleansing and all that kind of stuff. Once you’ve progressed through that and you’re happy, do you supplement your diet at all now from day to day?

Brad

[00:48:30] I’m a huge fan of supplements. I spend a lot of my time researching and understanding how these work, all the way down to what’s the best time of the day to take them. When I work with people, I actually include supplements in the reset as well because I found it accelerates the results faster. I use supplements to balance things out and then get people off of them. I think everybody has like their foundation stuff, like some fish oil, some vitamin D. For me like magnesium I kind of look at that as like a foundation one, but I do love to use them. I’m launching a new program on Thursday called Eat Sleep Recover, and you answer a bunch of questions.

[00:49:00] Within the questions it tells me oh, the problem is your liver. You’re going to do the reset and going to these supplements to support your liver or it’s your adrenals. You’re going to do the reset. You’re going to take these specific supplements, and we’ll send them to you. This month, now it’s changed. Now it’s gone from your adrenals to now it’s your blood sugar or whatever. We’re just tracking that stuff and using the supplementation to fine tune and fix things at a deeper level quicker. I really believe if you take supplements, you get there quicker.

Stu

Yeah, no. Yeah, I absolutely agree. Again like supplements, for me, I don’t think would necessarily be something that you would be on forever. You’d use them for a specific purpose.

Brad

Yeah. I heard about you guys from Ruth. I remember looking up you guys. You guys have that, I don’t know what it is, but it’s almost like a meal replacement, which is packed full of like some proteins, some nutrients. It’s just crazy good stuff. I have a lot of clients walk around with something similar to that. Are you guys available in America?

Stu

[00:50:00] Yes, we are. I mean we always believe that nothing beats real food, but unfortunately in today’s society, it can be really hard. We got time constraints. We’ve got all manner of processed options at our disposable that are just calling us. We just took a whole heap of super nutritious whole food ingredients, things like chia seeds, cillian husks, almond milk, coconut, grass-fed whey protein and just crushed and ground them into a meal essentially. You can get a super, super nutritious really, really quick.

Brad

That’s awesome. I like that. I like my clients to walk around with something like that for when they get stuck on an airport or when they get stuck in a meeting. I have my clients have something like that in their office and in their travel bags always so that at any time if they get stuck, I don’t want them going to have fast food. I figured out how you can eat fast food once in a while and get away with it, but I think it’s very critical for people to understand this is the best tool you can use if you’re high stressed is to always have that on the side. I walk around with stuff in my backpack all the time in case I get stuck and I can’t get to a good meal.

[00:51:00] I find that it’s managing the stress response, right? If you go without it, stress can go crazy. If you have it, it will keep your blood sugar stable and your stress stable. I think it’s really important.

Stu

I think so too. Well, for me at least, preparation is the key. If I just prep for this stuff, I know that I’ll never be caught out because I know it’s a tricky world out there.

Brad

[00:51:30] I travel a lot now speaking and man, my first year on the road, I was horrible. I was miserable and fat very quickly. I’m fat. I feel horrible, and I’m preaching about energy and health. I’m like this is stupid.

Stu

It’s not the best look, is it?

Brad

I got to figure this out.

Stu

Brilliant. What are your non-negotiables then personally to crush everyday?

Brad

[00:52:00] I call it the fallout point, like what’s that one thing you do that’s good for yourself no matter what? For me it’s always a little bit of time for myself in the morning. Whether it’s either reading or going for a walk, it’s just at least 30 minutes just to myself at the crack of dawn where nobody else is around me. Because I find if I start the day relaxed, I handle stress so much better. Some morning it’s meditation. Some morning it’s walking. Some morning it’s reading, but it’s a 30 minute window that’s just me. It’s my time. It’s feeding me. That is my one non-negotiable.

Stu

[00:52:30] I completely understand where you’re coming from. I’ve got three young daughters and come 7 o’clock, our house is a war zone. It’s a war zone like you wouldn’t believe.

Brad

That’s awesome.

Stu

I’m up about 6 o’clock and that just gives me a little bit of head space before I have to go into defense mode and tackle the fires.

Brad

That’s awesome. That’s awesome.

Stu

[00:53:00] Look, Brad, we’re coming up against time, so I got a couple of little questions here. If you could take all of the knowledge that you’ve learned through your metabolic studies and your living legendary protocols into a simple take home piece of advice, let’s just say I met you in an elevator and I said, “Look Brad, help me out. I’m struggling. Any tips,” what would you say to me?

Brad

[00:53:30] I’d tell you to wake up, take back your health and live legendary. Like literally wake up because either you’re going to wake up or life’s going to wake you up. At that point you have one choice, take control of your health or give up. The reality is at some point you’re going to have to take control of your health. This message that I’m sharing about focused on energy and recovery and managing all that, it’s going to be required sooner or later. When you have a heart attack or you have cancer, you cannot go out lift it. You cannot starve yourself from it. You have to face it head on. You have to take great care of yourself.

[00:54:00] In those moments, work doesn’t matter. It’s so important to like just grab a hold of like this is my life, this is what matters to me and here’s why I’m going to take care of myself. Just literally answer those questions. This is what’s important to me. This is why I need to be healthier and have more energy. Once you grab that, it changes everything.

Stu

It comes back to that saying, doesn’t it, if you want change, you have to change something.

Brad

[00:54:30] Yes. Yes. Yes. Literally in this realm it’s either you change it or life is going to make you change it. Literally I’ve seen it come in the forms of cancer, heart attack, divorce. Something’s coming for you. In that moment, the only thing you have that’s going to help you is how well you take care of yourself.

Stu

Yeah, totally.

Brad

It’s really the only thing you have to control. At some point in your life, that’s coming. The only you can control is how you exercise and how you eat to deal with the crazy amount of stress you have on your life.

Stu

Yeah, totally. The majority of us we don’t make that change until the pain is too great.

Brad

Totally.

Stu

Ideally we want to try and nip that in the bud and make change before that happens.

Brad

Yeah. Just grab and control your metabolism is the easiest way to do it.

Stu

Brilliant. Fantastic. What’s next for Brad Davidson? You mentioned you’ve got some programs coming.

Brad

[00:55:30] Two years ago, I sold my gym. I used to own the gym I started out of my car in Orange County, California called Stark. It was awesome, but I wanted a bigger reach. I sold my gym two years ago, and I started working on some new platforms that are now online and global. Eatsleeprecover.com is the first one. It goes live on Thursday, the 15th of March in the United States. Then I have a training app I’ve built out that have all my training strategies around those whole idea of apply stress, recover from stress. It’s built around my methodology of what I believe to be the best forms of training if it’s about living the life the way you want, how you want.

[00:56:00] That should go live in the next month. It’s called BDFIT.co. Then the last thing I have coming out is the cool coaching program. It’s a monthly plan. It’s live. It’s online. It’s just all my best stuff with me. I’m very excited about these things.

Stu

Well, you’re clearly a type A personality. You’re obviously doing something right because you’re looking okay. All right. Fantastic. How can we get more of Brad Davidson? Where do we go?

Brad

[00:56:30] My main site is braddavidson.com. You can go there and access all my stuff. There’s links to Eat Sleep Recover. There’s links to the training app. You can just go straight to eatsleeprecover.com. What I’m excited about that, if you go there and fill out the questionnaire, you’ll automatically get a free nutrition plan following my systems. It’s the metabolic reset specific to you and your needs. You can pay for upgrades or you can get like progressions and accountability, and go from the reset to optimization, to maintenance. You can buy supplements in regards to that as well. It’s a pretty cool plan. I’m very excited about it.

Stu

Fantastic.

Brad

That’s eatsleeprecover.com.

Stu

The book as well, “21 Day Metabolic Reset,” can we find that on your website?

Brad

Amazon’s the best place for that.

Stu

Okay. Wherever books are sold, you’ll find it.

Brad

Amazon, Barnes & Noble, all the big ones. I do have a stash of about a thousand books right behind me or behind you that I’m going to be doing a special with over the next probably 30 days where I’ll basically giving out autographs for free with some shipping covered. Probably going to be 30 days our before that’s done.

Stu

Okay. Fantastic. Well, look mate, we’ll share all those links in the show notes.

Brad

Awesome.

Stu

I’ve had a ball. I’ve learned so much. I’m super keen to look at your programs and can’t wait to get your book. Thank you so much for your time. I really appreciate it.

Brad

Hey, welcome. I’d love to hear your feedback on the book. It’s a very different look into this realm of high stressed, high achievers. I’ve got to work with the best of the best regards to professional athletes, SWAT, SEALS, CEOs of billion dollar companies. I’ve seen stressed at its finest. You just need something different if we’re stressed.

Stu

Brilliant. No, that’s awesome. I can’t wait to share this with our audience. I’m sure they’ll get a huge amount out of this as I have as well.

Brad

Awesome. Super excited. Thank you.

Stu

Thank you so much, mate. We’ll speak to you soon.

Brad

All right. Sounds good.

  • Share:

    Want More Articles Like This?

    Sign-up for the 180 Nutrition mailing list to receive the latest news and updates.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *