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Chris Burres – Can ESS60 in Olive Oil Double Your Life Span?

Content by: Chris Burres

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Stu: This week, I’m excited to welcome Chris Burres to the show. Chris is the owner of SCS Research, the first company to deliver nanomaterials and MyVitalC, which is the world’s first nano-antioxidant. In this episode, we talk about the Nobel Prize winning chemical that was proven to almost double the lifespan of mammals, and how he decided to make this into a household item. He’s now on a mission to help people live longer, healthier, and pain-free lives.

Audio Version

downloaditunesListen to Stitcher Questions we ask in this episode:

  • What are buckyballs/C60? (05:10)
  • What is ESS60 traditionally used for? (12:33)
  • What were the results of the animal study using ESS60? (13:29)

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Limited Time Offer From Chris Burres

If you enjoyed listening to this conversation and would like to try ESS60 for yourself, Chris and the team at MyVitalC are offering our listeners a limited-time coupon to save $15 off each order. Simply use the code 180ess60 during checkout. View their products here: https://www.myvitalc.com/

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Full Transcript

Stu

00:03 Hey, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition, and welcome to another episode of the health sessions. It’s here that we connect with the world’s best experts in health, wellness and human performance, in an attempt to cut through the confusion around what it actually takes to achieve a long lasting health. Now I’m sure that’s something that we all strive to have. I certainly do.

00:23 Before we get into the show today, you might not know that we make products too. That’s right. We’re into whole food nutrition, and have a range of super foods and natural supplements to help support your day. If you are curious want, to find out more, just jump over to our website. That is 180nutrition.com.au, and take a look. Okay. Back to the show.

00:44 This week, I’m excited to welcome Chris Burres to the show. Chris is the owner of SCS Research, the first company to deliver nanomaterials and MyVitalC, which is the world’s first nano-antioxidant. In this episode, we talk about the Nobel prize winning chemical that was proven to almost double the lifespan of mammals, and how he decided to make this into a household item. He’s now on a mission to help people live longer, healthier, and pain-free lives. Over to Chris.

01:17 Hey guys, this is Stu from one 180 Nutrition, and I’m delighted to welcome Chris Burres to the podcast. Chris, how are you?

Chris

01:24 I am doing wonderful, Stu. I had to adjust my note from Stuart to Stu, so I can fit in on the podcast. That’s what I want to do. I’m doing wonderful. I want to thank you for having me today.

Stu

01:35 Yeah, no, fantastic. Well, look, very intrigued to get into our topic, which we’ll talk about in depth in a second, but first up, for everyone out there that may not be familiar with you or your work, I’d love it if you could just tell us a little bit about yourself.

Chris

01:53 Sure. So, really, we’re here today to talk about a a mouthful, and that is carbon nanomaterials.

Stu

02:00 Yes.

Chris

02:00 I’ve been a carbon nanomaterial manufacturer since 1991. I started the company when my business partner was actually separating the materials for a Dr. Paul Chiu, at the Texas Center for Superconductivity, that’s here at the university of Houston, go Cougs! And, at the time the material, was actually selling for about $6,000 a gram.

Stu

02:22 Wow. Wow, crikey.

Chris

02:23 That’s worth repeating, right? $6,000, that’s just exciting.

Stu

02:27 Yeah.

Chris

02:28 And one day, his professor, Dr. Paul Chiu, he’s actually fairly famous in the superconductivity world. He came in, he was like, “You guys are young kids. This is an expensive material that is going to be sought after. You should start a company.” And my business partner comes from an entrepreneurial background, and so, he was off and running, and then they brought me on board. Actually there were two partners. They brought me on board, to help design the equipment.

Stu

02:53 Okay.

Chris

02:53 And that was the equipment that would manufacture these carbon nanomaterials. And so, really there I am, mechanical engineer at the University of Houston, and they engage me. I always knew I wanted to be an entrepreneur. That was, very clear vision in my head, and so, when they engaged me to help them build a piece of equipment, I kind of stuck around, and the other business partner kind of disappeared.

Stu

03:17 Yeah.

Chris

03:18 Nothing nefarious, you just, you hear that stuff. And so, Robert and I have been business partners since 1991, that’s when we manufactured our first carbon nanomaterials, and we’re the first company to manufacture and deliver carbon nanomaterials of macroscopic quantities that still exist. One company beat us, but they didn’t last. They barely lasted a year, actually.

Stu

03:41 Yeah, yeah.

Chris

03:43 So we are that first company, so-

Stu

03:44 Fantastic! Well that, then that leads me into a little bit of a story. So I, we’re in Byron Bay, Australia, and I go to the Surf Club at the beach, and do some training there. And there’s a guy there, that I get on really well with. And he’s an older guy, very into his health, whether it be conventional, alternative, right into woo woo, as well.

Chris

04:08 Yeah.

Stu

04:08 And he knows that I run a podcast, and he said to me, “Oh, Stu, have you heard about C60? And I said, ‘Oh, actually, yes I have…

Chris

04:18 You’re like, “Of course I have. I’ve heard of everything.”

Stu

04:21 Yeah, exactly right. And in my mind’s eye, I’m thinking, “I know a little bit about it,” and he goes, “Great, because I have got a…” He has a natural alternative magazine that he reads.

04:30 And so, he said, “Right. Tomorrow,” he said, “I’m going to drop you off a magazine, and it’s got a whole spread and I want you to tell me what you think about this.” So, I had a good read. And it was a very interesting article about, it almost looked like this amazing miracle ingredient.

04:48 But it took, it spoke about things that I wasn’t too sure about, things like Buckyballs. They were talking about C60 in different forms, and there was a Nobel prize wrapped up in there. as well. So-

Chris

05:00 Yeah.

Stu

05:01 I think you’d be the right guy to kind of, just expand on that. So tell us a little bit about Buckyballs, C 60, Nobel prize, why should we be interested in this?

Chris

05:11 Yeah. So, if we start, when my business partner was approached at the time, he was separating fullerenes. So let’s roll back, because that begs the questions, what are fullerenes?

05:22 In 1985, three professors, Dr. Robert, Richard Smalley, Robert Curl, and Harold Kroto actually discovered the third form of carbon. So we’re all familiar with diamond and graphite, and now there’s actually a whole gamut of molecules, called fullerenes. And even the naming of this molecule is, in the gamut of molecules, is pretty interesting.

05:46 There’s a guy by the name of Buckminster Fuller, who, brought to the forefront, is a famous kind of visionary and architect who brought to the forefront… We’ve probably all seen geodesic domes. I don’t know if Australia is like it is here in the States. When you’re at the beach, you kind of, every now and then, you see this domed house, right?

06:07 Maybe you don’t have them there, you’re not nodding. But here, if you’re going down the beach, and there’s houses there, every now and then you’ll see a round house, right?

Stu

06:16 Okay.

Chris

06:16 It stands out because, well, that’s a geodesic dome and Buckminster Fuller didn’t invent the geodesic dome, but really brought it into mainstream consciousness, as a great manufacturing process.

Stu

06:28 Right.

Chris

06:29 So when Richard Smalley and Harold Kroto and Dr. Curl discovered the molecule, and realized that it’s really 60 carbon atoms in one molecule, and I’ve got one behind me, for those people who turn into the video, and I’ll describe it.

Stu

06:44 Yeah.

Chris

06:45 It’s basically, imagine a chemistry student took his chemistry set and made a soccer ball. So you’ve got-

Stu

06:52 Yeah.

Chris

06:52 Sixty carbon atoms around the different points, and then you’ve got all the bonds between the carbon atoms. So if you imagine a soccer ball, the lines on the soccer ball represent the bonds between the carbon atoms.

07:03 So they figured out that this shape, which is surprisingly similar to the geodesic dome, was the shape of this kind of molecule they were searching for. Because they had a reading on one of their pieces of equipment that said, “Hey, 60’s the number,” and they’re trying to figure out, “Well, why is 60 the number?”

07:19 Well this shape, this Buckyball shape, is the number. So Buckminster Fuller, the whole gamut of molecules, are called fullerenes.

Stu

07:28 Right.

Chris

07:28 And then, this is affectionately called the Buckyball. So I would, in the early days, explain to my friends and families, that I make this. And they would say, “Well, great, well, what’s that good for?”

Stu

07:41 Yeah.

Chris

07:41 And the joke at the time was, that it’s really good for funding. If you want to write a proposal and submit it to the government, you’re likely to get funded, if it’s about this material.

07:53 Just an interesting fact, in 1991, there’s an organization that keeps track of, every research paper references other papers, right?

Stu

08:03 Right, yeah.

Chris

08:03 So there’s an organization that keeps track of how many, it’s like a Google of research papers, how many papers are referencing a certain paper. And then it says, “These are the top 10 most referenced papers.” In 1991, it happened to be the year we started the company, all 10 of the top 10 most referenced papers were regarding fullerenes.

Stu

08:24 Right, okay.

Chris

08:25 Right? So the research community was just going nuts. And it caused a couple of things. One of the things that it caused was, in 1996, those three scientists won the Nobel Prize for that discovery.

08:42 In general, people assume, I don’t know if you are familiar with how important the benzene ring is. So, benzene ring is a six-sided molecule with carbons, typically has hydrogens on the outside, and it’s the foundation of most medicines and plastics.

Stu

08:57 Okay.

Chris

08:57 So you can just, if you stop for a second, and you thought, “Well, what would life today be without, I don’t know, plastic?”

Stu

09:05 Well, that could be-

Chris

09:06 Well, we’d be looking-

Stu

09:07 Well, talking to, yeah, talking to the environmentalists on the podcast side, probably would be going, “Yeah, it’d actually be pretty good.”

Chris

09:13 Yeah! It would be, life would be perfect, right?

Stu

09:14 Yeah.

Chris

09:15 Except you wouldn’t have your monitor, you wouldn’t have your ear buds.

Stu

09:18 Yeah.

Chris

09:18 All of these things that we know of with modern modern society wouldn’t be in place. And then, also throw in medicines. Well, that benzene ring, so the six-sided ring, is actually known to be toxic. So in general, you want to stay away from it.

Stu

09:33 Yeah.

Chris

09:34 And what’s interesting about this, this Buckyball, so again, I’m holding up this molecule, looks like a soccer ball, is that it’s actually got 20 hexagons on it, right?

Stu

09:44 Right, yeah.

Chris

09:45 So that’s plenty of the main part of the benzene ring. So what they assumed, really early on, was that this was like a 3-D version of benzene.

Stu

09:54 Okay.

Chris

09:54 And if benzene is ubiquitous in our society, then at some point, the Buckyball’s going to be ubiquitous in our society. Make sense that the scientist who discovered it won the Nobel Prize, like it’s the foundation of modern society.

10:09 So the reason we’re having a conversation is if you’ve… Oh, I didn’t, I didn’t answer the real question, which is, what are Buckyballs used for? So-

Stu

10:17 Yes.

Chris

10:18 They’re harder than a diamond. They’ll actually turn into a diamond. They’ve got sixfold symmetry. So it’s one of the strongest materials man knows about. You can, and I can’t remember the, I don’t remember the number off the top of my head, but you can fire it at a steel plate at 10,000 feet per second, some amazing number, and it just bounced back. Most molecules would just crumble in that situation.

Stu

10:43 Right.

Chris

10:43 It just bounces back. What’s also interesting is there’s a new symbol in chemistry, because of this molecule. It’s big enough for any atom on the periodic chart to fit inside of it. So there’s, the new symbol is the at symbol, we’re familiar with it from e-mail, right?

Stu

11:00 Yes.

Chris

11:00 Our at e-mail address.

Stu

11:02 Yeah.

Chris

11:02 So lanthanum at C 60, means lanthanum physically trapped inside of six 60. It’s not covalently or ionically bonded to the exterior of it. It’s physically trapped inside of it. And that was, I mean, that was one of the things that was pretty, the scientific community was really excited about it, because maybe, one of the early theories with a medical application was, maybe we can trap a radioactive atom on the inside. The chemistry that we know how to use on hexane actually does apply to the Buckyball.

11:35 So maybe we can attach something to the outside, that would, say, be attractive to cancer cells. And now you could take this atomic bomb and drop it right out of cancer cell. So those theories were going on in the ’90s.

Stu

11:48 Yeah.

Chris

11:52 So, we’ve got this at symbol. One of the ways that I describe it is, that Carbon 60 fullerenes perform as well or better than the current best material, in almost every application. And that’s why, again, 10 out of 10 of the most cited papers in 1991 were about fullerenes.

Stu

12:11 So-

Chris

12:12 The problem is expensive.

Stu

12:16 So C 60, so this, it just sounds like you’ve got this amazing molecule. And for everybody that, you can’t see this, I mean, I’m from the UK, and picture a leather soccer ball-

Chris

12:28 Yup.

Stu

12:28 With leather hexagonal patches, all the way around. That’s what we’re looking at.

Chris

12:33 Yup.

Stu

12:33 So C60, what do we do with it? What’s its use?

Chris

12:37 Yeah, so, we’re happy to report that it’s not just good for funding anymore.

Stu

12:43 Okay, yeah.

Chris

12:45 Again, they knew it was going to be ubiquitous in society, and because hexane was toxic, they had actually assumed that the Buckyball would be toxic as well. And in fact, it is, in a number of situations. So in 2012, they did a toxicity study, really interesting study.

13:03 So they gave rats water, and they gave rats water, olive oil, and then they gave… And here’s where I start to make a distinction between C 60-

Stu

13:11 Yes.

Chris

13:12 And I like to say C 60 is for industrial applications. If it’s improperly processed, it’s known to be harmful. It’s not, it not might be harmful. If it’s improperly processed, it’s known to be harmful.

Stu

13:23 Okay.

Chris

13:25 ESS60 is C 60 that’s been processed for, safe for human consumption.

Stu

13:28 Right.

Chris

13:29 So, go back to the rat study. They gave the rats water, that’s the control group, olive oil, and then olive oil with ESS60. Again, they thought it would be toxic. Instead of being toxic, the rats that they give, really, it’s the MyVitalC formulation to, lived 90% longer than the control group.

13:46 So just like $6,000 a gram, 90% longer is worth repeating. I just did, because it’s the single longest longevity experiment on mammals ever. And what I do, I’ve got, I’ve been on a number of podcasts.

14:01 And I like to ask, if anybody in your audience is aware of a peer, it’s peer reviewed and published, so that’s very important, study on mammals, that shows a longer extension of life. I’d like to know about it, because I’ve been looking for them for two years.

14:16 I’m confident that this is it, but if there’s another one out there, I want to know about it. So that’s one of my quests, if your audience knows about that.

14:24 What’s also really interesting and really important about that original study is, these were Wistar rats, and a typical Wistar rat will live for about 32 months. And that’s what they did in this study. And they’ll have a known amount of tumors. And the amount of tumors is proportional, like, the longer they live, the more tumor mass they have in their body.

14:43 What’s interesting is those rads, given the MyVitalC formulation, lived 90% longer, so out to 62 months, and they should have had a lot more tumors. But none of them had any tumors. So that’s a pretty phenomenal result. And when I say that, “A lot of people like start thinking, ‘Oh, anti-cancer,’ and that makes me really nervous, because the FDA listens to everything I say here on things.'”

Stu

15:06 Yeah. Absolutely.

Chris

15:06 There’s a big difference between being able to cure a cancer that has metastasized, and being a cancer preventative.

Stu

15:15 Yes.

Chris

15:15 So we know that exercise and eating good is a cancer preventative. Good sleep, also. And the implications in this study are certainly that it has some cancer preventative processes. So I like to try and pre-empt people from going that step and saying, ‘Oh anti-cancer.'” No, that’s a very dangerous water that you go into.

Stu

15:36 So how do you take a, how do you transition from a study on rats, given the fact that you said that C 60, or some forms of C 60, can be dangerous for humans, [crosstalk 00:15:52]-

Chris

15:52 Are dangerous, are-

Stu

15:52 Are dangerous for humans?

Chris

15:53 Yeah.

Stu

15:54 So how do you transition from the rat to the human? How do we know that ESS60, then, is safe for

16:00 … for humans and longterm use.

Chris

16:04 That’s a great question and actually leads directly into my second quest. First quest, is there a peer-reviewed published research on mammals that shows a longer extension of life? The second is it makes sense as a scientist that there’s a number. What percentage of things that happen in a rat happen in a human or maybe don’t happen in a rat, don’t happen in a human when you consume something?

16:31 We kind of know intuitively there has to be a number, right? Like it’s 20% or 80%? We probably have a feeling it’s pretty high because they never get to do human trials until they’ve done rat trials and sometimes going into pig trials. I know this upsets a lot of people who are concerned about animals. When it comes to life or death situations, I think we have to do this testing. In my opinion, when it comes to like beauty and are we going to put mascara on rabbits’ eyes to see if it’s sensitive, I think that’s inhumane and we shouldn’t be doing that type of study.

17:05 So the question, I actually posed it to a professor, his name is Eiron Cudaback at DePaul University. He actually takes rat studies and migrates them into human studies and I asked them this question. What percentage of what happens to a rat happens in a human? He gave me a pretty long and very interesting story. I mean relatively long, so I’ll be brief. Basically he says most scientists will tell you, “Here’s the particular case study,” and I’ll talk about it in a second. “Here’s the particular case study that proves what happens to a rat doesn’t happen to a human.” The case study goes like this.

17:41 There was a morning sickness drug and they gave it to rats. I don’t know how you tell morning sickness in a rat, but apparently it passed that test and so they started giving it to humans. They went to human trials. Unfortunately, it resulted in deformed fetuses, right? So here’s the study that people were like, “Well, look what happens to a rat doesn’t necessarily happen to a human.” What Dr. Cudaback mentioned to me was, “Well, had they looked at the fetuses of the rats, they would have noticed that they were deformed,” right? So it’s not that what happens in a rat isn’t applicable to humans. If you look at the wrong data of a rat, then you’re going to get the wrong data. It’s different data points, right? So that study was, is it safe on rats? Yeah, nothing happened to the rats. Is it safe on humans? Yeah, nothing happened to the mothers. But if you ask the question, is it safe on fetuses? The answer is no.

18:33 So, for me, it’s very telling that this is the example Dr. Cudaback tells me, “Hey, this is what most scientists say is the reason not, but it’s actually inaccurate.” So I don’t know what the number is, but I think it’s pretty high, right? What happens in a rat tends to happen in a human, so that’s important.

18:55 Now, I think kind of from a personal perspective, what’s interesting on my journeying is that study comes out in 2012, and mid-2013, we start getting phone calls. “Hey, Chris, how much in a dose?” I have a carbon nanomaterial hat. I’m a scientist, right? I sell carbon nanomaterials. Our initial response was, “No, this is for ink and batteries and solar cells and tires. You do not put this in the human body.”

19:26 This is despite the fact, again, C60 industrial purpose is harmful. The research on ESS60 C60 process properly was very clear that it was safe. They had injected it subcutaneously under the rat’s skin, made them inhale it with no ill effects and then, of course, the famous toxicity study. Well, they live 90% longer. But because we’re conservative scientists, we actually added “Not for human consumption” to our labeling for the first time in mid-2013.

19:58 If you want to recreate this rat study, then we have our ESS 60 in oil and we’re selling it research purposes only, not for human consumption. But you fast forward to 2017 and a guy with a really big YouTube following starts talking about how he’s taking the product and all the benefits that he’s getting, and some other companies were taking the raw ingredient and mixing it in oil and the industry sold out. Everybody except for us because we’re the largest manufacturer and distributor of ESS 60 on the planet.

20:28 So, the industry sells out. I really wake up in 2018 and as a business owner, I’ve got a supplement opportunity, which as a scientist feels a little uncomfortable. My feeling is that most people become supplement people because one, they wake up and decide “I want to be really wealthy and I’m going to sell supplements” and I have no problem with people being wealthy. The other is often people have their own health issues or maybe the health issues of family or I was recently on Dr. Gundry’s podcast. He had health issues with his patients and then realized a solution for them and now they want to save the world, right, and it’s a supplement, let’s say.

21:13 I have no problem with people wanting to save the world. That’s just not how I ended up as a supplement guy. It’s basically I’ve been manufacturing this material since 1991. They do a toxicity study in 2012. I resisted the obvious financial windfall that could come from it until really our customers are clamoring for it. In 2018 and 2019 now I’m a supplement guy, a reluctant supplement guy.

Stu

21:44 So definitely safe, well, safe for human consumption. Many people are happily taking it.

21:55 I did a little bit of research and saw that there were a number of questions likening C60 and ESS 60 to activated charcoal. So I thought I’d throw that question at you. Tell me about it. Are they similar?

Chris

22:15 There may be some parallels. I can talk about specific research that we were involved in. The manufacturing process to make fullerenes, so not even C60 yet and not ESS 60, or basically the most kind of common process right now is basically to vaporize two graphite rods in a inert environment. Out of that comes a soot and that soot is about 10% fullerenes. So we actually kind of extracted the fullerenes from that soot and then sent the remaining soot. It’s amorphous carbon. We kind of call it carbon crap because it’s mostly in our way, right?

22:52 We sent that soot over to the University of Houston and they did some studies on it and some applicability in comparison to activated charcoal. They said basically it was as good or better than activated charcoal in doing the things that a activated charcoal does, which is usually absorbing organics.

23:14 So, if you think about it, that manufacturing process is super similar to making a material that’s better than activated charcoal. So our current belief is that, yeah, it has some of these detoxing effects. It has this ability to grab on to organics that you might not want in your body and move them out.

23:36 Now a big, big difference is activated charcoal runs through your intestinal system and doesn’t get into your bloodstream, right? ESS 60 is actually a nanomaterial and has the ability to get into your bloodstream and even, in fact, across the blood-brain barrier. Yes, their big similarity is the carbon. The difference between them, though, is incredibly massive.

24:03 In fact, I’ve done some videos, there’s people on Amazon who are selling activated charcoal and it says on it ” [potentiate 00:24:12] C60.”

Stu

24:13 Oh, right. [inaudible 00:24:15]

Chris

24:15 I’m not exactly sure what “potentiate C60” means. Maybe it means potentially there are C60 in it, I don’t know. But we did a quick little test on it and there’s no C60 in it. So there’s a lot of people already trying to clam on to this understanding that you have, right, that led to us doing this podcast together like, “Well, that sounds really exciting. A lot of people are really excited. Let me add the word ‘potentiate C60’ to my bottle and make more money,” which just really kind of sucks.

Stu

24:44 So how do you supplement then with ESS 60? What do you do?

Chris

24:50 My typical routine is in my coffee… So we’ve got three products. We’ve got a MCT version, an olive oil version and then an avocado version. It’s really important. This is the right time. It’s really important to talk about.

25:03 Olive oil has the ability. You can dissolve about 0.8 milligrams per milliliter of ESS 60 in olive oil. Avocado is about 0.65 so significantly less and then MCT oil is about 0.35. So if you want to take kind of an equivalent ESS 60 quantity, you actually have to take more than double the MCT, right?

25:27 One of the reasons I’m very specific about that is because there are companies selling purple oil and have not been forthcoming with that information. I know that they recently changed their label and the label is actually accurate now, but when they’re on podcast or when they’re doing marketing, they’re not sharing that MCT is less than half the amount of ESS 60 in our case as the other products. So it’s just not right. It’s not the right way to approach things.

25:57 My routine is, I don’t know if you’re familiar with the Bulletproof coffee and Dave Asprey-

Stu

26:01 Yes.

Chris

26:02 Huge vibe, coined the phrase ‘biohacker’.

Stu

26:05 Yup.

Chris

26:06 His kind of Bulletproof coffee is a particular coffee, add some MCT and then add a little bit of of an A2 butter.

26:13 Well, so I kind of go for a little bit of that effect. I’d take our MCT oil and I add it to my coffee. So I’ve got MCT with ESS 60 in it my coffee and then I take about a teaspoon and a half or we actually have this really convenient dose and a dosing system for those who can see it. It looks like it’s a little-

Stu

26:31 Oh, yeah.

Chris

26:32 If you imagine a contact lens solution, like a single-use contact lens solution, it’s that kind of packaging. It has exactly one teaspoon in it, 5 mils and so that’s something that I’ll take. In fact, I’ll take one of these right now.

Stu

26:47 There we go. Wow. Would you do that every day?

Chris

26:52 This, I actually do one and a half of these, so I’ll take this on a podcast, but I’ll do a really about a teaspoon and a half. If I feel like I’m getting rundown, then I’ll actually go take another dose because, for me, it does drive some energy for sure.

27:13 Then we have one other product, the avocado, and I’ll put that on my salad just to include that, so I really do use all three of our products.

Stu

27:22 If we’re new to this and we want to experiment ourselves, would we typically feel any different? I mean you liken it so you take some B vitamins or something along those lines and you feel a bit more peppy, you’ve got a bit more energy. What about with these supplements?

Chris

27:38 It’s really interesting. Our best, and I’m going to talk a little bit about testimonials so it’s really important to say the FDA has not evaluated our product. It’s not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. I’m going to share some anecdotes with you. These are all kind of verifiable customer reports to us and we actually… If I can’t document it and kind of confirm that we can reach out to the customer, then I won’t talk about it, right? That’s really important.

28:08 Our most consistent testimonial is better sleep, right? The thing with sleep is if you got one extra hour of sleep tonight, would you really notice?

Stu

28:20 Oh, look, you’re talking to somebody who is so intrigued by sleep and so infatuated by wanting to increase the quality of sleep. Yes, if I got an extra hour of sleep, I’d feel like Superman.

Chris

28:35 Are you familiar? I’ve got an Oura Ring. I don’t know if you’re familiar with Oura-

Stu

28:39 I’ve got the silver version so I can tell you about HRV, resting heart rate, everything about it. So, yeah, I track my sleep meticulously.

Chris

28:47 You are Australian. Have you been known to imbibe and notice the difference in your resting heart rate as it impacts your sleep?

Stu

28:55 Yes.

Chris

28:56 Right? It takes a while for your resting heart rate to come down from an elevated rate when you’ve had two… We’ll go with two beers.

Stu

29:05 Yeah. This is one of the reasons why I try and eat my evening meal earlier, rather than later because I find… And the same with exercise. Resting heart rate just stays higher longer and it impacts deep sleep and REM sleep.

Chris

29:19 Absolutely. Have you read the book, Why We Sleep? by Michael Walker?

Stu

29:24 No, but I’ve reached out and we’re hoping… I’ve listened to a ton of podcasts with him. Very, very smart guy and hoping to have him on the podcast this year.

Chris

29:33 I could not encourage you more to read the book. You already seem like you’re a little scared. It’s the scariest book you will ever read about sleep because he just throws data point after data point about-

Stu

29:45 Absolutely right, yeah.

Chris

29:45 … if you miss this then this happens, if you miss this amount of sleep.

29:50 I’m actually in contact with a scientist at Oura Ring. We actually have one guy who’s already gone through this and maybe you want to participate in this. You’ve got data before being on my product, right?

Stu

30:03 Yep.

Chris

30:04 So the one data point that we have right now is 10 days prior, 10 days on, 10 days off again and then 10 days back on. Actually he was sending me the screenshot of the Oura Ring screenshot every day and so I could see how much sleep he was getting. It improved his sleep and I’ve got a testimonial from him that “Oh, I always take the product,” right, because he was struggling with sleep.

Stu

30:31 Sorry, when you said improved his sleep, what areas of sleep did it improve? I’m intrigued.

Chris

30:36 He had a couple of ones. I think in general we might say that he’s not a good sleeper, right, and he was getting six-ish hours of sleep a night. But on that graph, most of it’s awake peaks, right, so he’s waking up 8, 10 more times and getting almost no deep sleep, right? We know there’s some inaccuracies in the ring, like how accurate is it in terms of figuring out deep sleep. But as a comparative, you can compare pre, post, pre, that’s a really good comparison. But his amount of wake times at night went down significantly.

Stu

31:17 Interesting.

Chris

31:18 Right? So he’s getting a lot more sleep. He’s also sleeping longer, so he’s getting a full eight. We haven’t boiled down the data or anything. I’m just going off of as he was sending them. He’s getting a couple extra hours of sleep and a lot less wake-ups through the night. So that’s what he’s reporting.

Stu

31:40 Very, very intesting.

Chris

31:40 So I’m excited. I want to get at least 20 people through this program and then aggregate all of that data and then we can actually say something concrete about sleep. Again, most consistent testimonial is better sleep. As you know, we always say sleep is good for your mental, physical and emotional

32:00 … wellbeing, but I feel like as a society, we’re like, “Sleep is really, really important, unless you have something else to do,” right?

Stu

32:07 Yeah. We liken it to the most important pillar of health. Doesn’t matter what you’re doing outside of that, if sleep doesn’t work for you, if you’re not getting deep, restorative, quality sleep, then game over. You really got to fix it.

Chris

32:22 Yeah.

Stu

32:22 So very intrigued about what you’re talking about right now.

Chris

32:27 In Michael Walker’s book, right, Why We Sleep, he talks about the $2 billion sleep aid industry, and I’m going to do a little air quotes on aid because what they do is they knock you out. Similar to when you have a couple of drinks, like nobody has knocked back a 12-pack and then wakes up the next day and go, “Well, I slept for 12 hours. I’m feeling very refreshed.” Right?

Stu

32:46 That’s right, yeah.

Chris

32:48 It’s the same with these quote unquote sleep aids, these prescription sleep aids. You take them at night. There’s a thing, and you probably know this, a lot of people don’t, there’s a chemical called adenosine, right? And adenosine is the chemical that signals to your body, “Hey, you want to go to sleep.” And not surprising, it builds up through the day. What these sleep aids do is they relax that chemical pressure. So the adenosine is kind of flushed out of the body, but they don’t let you get the REM and the NREM sleep.

33:15 Here’s what’s crazy about my product. I’m saying crazy because I only believe it because I’ve got enough testimonials. I spent all of nine months of 2018, answering the phone and people telling me stuff about my product and I’m like, “I believe you because you seem like an honest person who’s telling me the truth. But the impact you’re saying it has on life, I don’t have any data.” I can’t go, “Oh yeah, it’s supposed to do that.” I don’t have anything that says it’s supposed to do that. So, it relieves that chemical process.

33:45 Our customers are reporting, they take it in the morning. You have mental energy and focus. Just like I mentioned, if I get a little like brain fog during the day, I’ll take another shot. And then they sleep better that night. And it was actually, I have been saying, I don’t know of anything like that. And in fact there is something like that and you will appreciate this, exercise.

Stu

34:06 Yes.

Chris

34:06 If you exercise in the morning, you will sleep better that night.

Stu

34:09 Yes, absolutely.

Chris

34:10 Other than that, what is there?

Stu

34:13 Yeah, well I have a whole sleep routine that incorporates things like infrared sauna, cold showers, a certain macronutrient profile of dinner with fat and protein dominant meal, blue blocking, all of the above. And that typically gets me a minimum of eight hours with at least two hours REM and two hours deep.

Chris

34:35 Yeah.

Stu

34:35 And I’m always pushing for more. Obviously, the goal state for me is I’ve reached three hours deep, but that was before.

Chris

34:43 Yeah.

Stu

34:44 That’s not every night. But, if we could share something with our audience that allowed them to get better sleep, then you have got a whole slurry of improvement, improved health markers that will absolutely line up for you. And as you said, Matthew Walker is like, that’s a rude awakening as to what’s happening, what will happen, if you do not fix your sleep. So yeah, very intrigued.

Chris

35:10 Yeah. So, I’m excited to actually be driving something that’s actually going to deliver data to support what the customer… So, a lot of people will downplay anecdotal information, including myself.

Stu

35:23 Yeah.

Chris

35:24 And it’s important to know that the anecdotal information is the first step of the scientific process.

Stu

35:29 Of course.

Chris

35:30 No one does an experiment because they think randomly something.

Stu

35:34 No.

Chris

35:35 Somebody or a number of people report to them something and they’re like, “Oh, that may be true. Let me test it.” So I kind of file all of this anecdotal information as like, “Okay, well these are data points.” And I don’t care. We get some people who say they don’t experience anything, great. That’s a data point. My product was never supposed to do anything anyway. So if you tell me, “Chris, it didn’t help me at all,” I’m okay with that because it’s kind of not supposed to. It just is getting reported a lot that it’s doing a lot of really impressive things.

36:07 So, and I think the other things that it reports, right? So people will tell us, like in my case, “I’ve got a knee pain. I played soccer for 25 years. I had a knee pain that just went away.”

Stu

36:20 Right.

Chris

36:21 And we’ve got testimonials related to like knuckles, that the pain in their knuckles has gone away. And I think if you get better sleep and your body’s actually able to do the restorative sleep that it’s supposed to be doing at night, that could be the cause of it.

Stu

36:36 Oh, absolutely. Yeah.

Chris

36:37 It may just be that simple.

Stu

36:38 Yeah. Reducing inflammation because everything’s working as it should be. Yeah, fascinating.

Chris

36:44 And then that goes into people reporting hair… Like I’ve often told people, if I continue to tell you the testimonials we have about our product, your belief will just start to go down.

Stu

36:54 Yep.

Chris

36:54 And so I’m kind of over that. I’m like, “Here, try it. If it works for you, great. If not, great.” But it’s working for a lot of people.

Stu

37:05 So for all of those now that are very interested and think, “Okay, so I want to find out more. I want to try some myself. I want to watch some videos. I want to I want to educate myself into this world.” Where do they start, where do they go?

Chris

37:22 So, before that, I did want to share one last thing because I think it’s, people often wonder, “Well, how is it working? Like what is it doing?” And the real answer is there are a lot of scientists working to try and figure out exactly what it’s doing.

37:40 We know that it’s an anti-inflammatory. We know that it’s an antioxidant. Some have reported 172 times more powerful than vitamin C. And we know, actually, the medical community says that aging is a process of oxidation and inflammation. So it’s kind of not surprising that something that helped mammals live 90% longer is a great antioxidant and a great anti-inflammatory. So, that makes sense.

38:03 We also know it’s a nanomaterial. It actually can get into the mitochondria and can participate in the ATP processes. By the way, this is really fascinating. The A in the ATP is actually adenosine.

Stu

38:14 That’s it, yeah.

Chris

38:15 So when ATP’s get broken apart, that’s how the adenosine builds up. So, as your body is going about its day generating energy, it’s creating this adenosine for you to wash out that night. So, we know it’s participating in those kind of really core fundamental processes. But we don’t know the specific mechanism that it may be doing some pretty amazing things.

38:37 I mean, one of them is in a Petri dish they they can take healthy cells and they can take cancer cells and then they can introduce an anticancer agent, which is a poison right?

Stu

38:48 Yep.

Chris

38:49 In the presence of ESS60, the healthy cells are protected. And the cancer cells, the agent is, actually, the efficacy of the agent is enhanced in the presence of ESS60.

Stu

39:01 Right.

Chris

39:01 Again, it’s in a Petri dish, right, so getting something from a Petri dish into a human is a substantial kind of leap which takes a lot of very expensive testing but the ramifications are pretty profound.

Chris

39:17 As far as how people can reach out to us, there’s lots of information online. If you just Google ESS60 or Google MyVitalC or just Google my name, you’ll find a lot of podcasts and articles that we’ve done.

39:32 If you’re interested in trying it, and actually if you’re interested, Stu, I’d be happy to send you a couple of bottles and put you in contact with my scientist friend at Oura Ring. And then you can like say, “Hey,” his name is Benjamin, “Benjamin, here’s my 10 days of data. I’m starting the product today.” And then we can actually like compare and contrast those two. I think it would be really… Well, and you could report it to your audience, in fact.

Stu

39:56 Absolutely.

Chris

39:57 Maybe we schedule another podcast in 30 days or so and kind of come back and you say, “Chris, it didn’t help my sleep,” or you say, “Chris, I saw this.”

Stu

40:06 Yeah, look, I accept the challenge because I truly value the importance of sleep. And it’s something-

Chris

40:14 Paramount.

Stu

40:15 … that I continually try and improve. And it’s pretty good at the moment, but I want it to be better.

Chris

40:22 So, you mentioned a lot of deep sleep. I actually don’t get that much deep sleep. I’m always in the warning, “Hey, you didn’t get enough deep sleep,” which is five to 20, I think right at 20 minutes it starts saying, maybe I’m okay, maybe it’s 30 minutes, it reports that I’m okay.

Stu

40:36 Okay.

40:37 But I’m feeling good, right? It’s just that I don’t get that much deep sleep. And maybe it’s the way I sleep or because, again, the Ring’s not 100%. It’s about 65% accurate.

40:49 Yeah, absolutely. And the Ring can sometimes tell me I’m asleep when I’m watching television, but, yeah. I’m very mindful of the data. But yeah, I would absolutely accept that challenge because I want sleep to be great or better for everyone [crosstalk 00:00:41:10].

Chris

41:09 Yeah. I agree. I think it’s really important and how blessed am I to have a product, whatever. It wasn’t supposed to enhance sleep and everybody, not everybody, but most people are coming back and telling us that it does help their sleep.

41:23 I’ve got a business coach who said for 50 years he needed an alarm clock to wake up and since he’s been on the MyVitalC formulation, he wakes up before the alarm clock.

Stu

41:32 Fantastic.

Chris

41:33 Like he just doesn’t need it anymore.

Stu

41:35 Yeah, I haven’t used an alarm clock for years, like it’s naturally wake up, which works for me at the moment, but fantastic. Well, so much information. I absolutely want to reconnect with you again in a months time. And yeah, I want to I want to discuss this in more detail, but we’re just coming up on time. So everything that we’ve spoken about today, we’ll put in the show notes and we’ll blast that across our channels as well. But just a couple of points. So what’s next? What have you got on the radar?

Chris

42:10 Let’s see. Oh, so this is kind of big. One Oura Ring, I think that’s pretty important.

Stu

42:18 Yeah.

Chris

42:18 The next thing that’s on our radar is to actually reproduce the original rat study, right? So the scientific process starts with anecdotal information or some theory, right? In this case, the theory was that the buckyball was toxic, which turned out not to be true. Then the next step is actually for another lab to step up and reproduce those results. No lab has done that. Part of the reason is those darn rats lived five and a half years, right? They’re only supposed to live three, two and a half years. So, it’s a long investment of time and money and mental energy and effort and all of those things.

42:54 But we have started the process. We’re doing the preliminary research to go into a particular lab and recreate that study. We’re going to make some modifications to the study that will be really interesting. So maybe the next podcast we can talk about those modifications. I think that’s going to be huge.

43:12 And I think a lot of supplement people get the bad rap of just selling the product. We’re actually investing in understanding what’s going on because it’s important. It’s not just, “Okay, they’re reporting better sleep,” let’s meet up with Oura Ring or some other kind of sleep expert and figure out is that actually true? Can we quantify that in some way?

Stu

43:35 Exciting. Fantastic. Well, I am deeply appreciative of your time this morning and-

Chris

43:42 Well, I appreciate you and your audience so if it’s okay with you, I’d like to give a coupon code-

Stu

43:48 Of course.

Chris

43:48 … if they’re interested in trying the product. So if they just go to MyVitalC.com, you can scroll down the page. I kind of have all the products towards the bottom of the page. There’s a significant discount for subscription and you can cancel at any time. So just take advantage of that.

Stu

44:05 Yep.

Chris

44:06 And if they use the code 180ESS60, so that’s 1-8-0-E-S-S-6-0, they’ll get an additional $15 off of their first order.

Stu

44:18 Fantastic.

Chris

44:18 And I’m excited about us getting back together and talk more geeky sleep stuff.

Stu

44:26 Stats, absolutely. Right. So, we’ll put all of that again in the show notes and we’ll push that out for our audience as well. And yeah, very intrigued. I’m going to try this myself. I’m going to report on the data. I’m an absolute sleep nerd, so I really want to share that with our audience, too, and look forward to connecting with you in a couple of months time. So Chris, thank you again and we’ll touch base soon.

Chris

44:50 Stu, thank you for having me.

Stu

44:51 Thank you.

 

 

Chris Burres

This podcast feature Chris Burres. He is the co-founder of SES Research and one of the leading experts on C60, particularly in olive oil. And that’s just what I want to talk with him about today, one of the coolest new compounds on the block and how its antioxidant benefits are... Read More
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