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Dr. Tom O’Bryan – The Autoimmune Fix

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Stu: This week we welcome Dr. Tom O’Bryan to the show. He is a world-renowned expert in the field of gluten-related disorders, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS), Celiac Disease (CD) and their link to other chronic conditions, including autoimmune disorders and diseases.

He is the founder of theDr.com which was created to educate the public about under-diagnosed and under-treated gluten-related disorders, which affect up to 30% of the population. He views the lack of recognition, diagnosis and treatment of these disorders as a massive public health crisis.

Dr. O’Bryan serves on the faculty of the Institute of Functional Medicine. His Certified Gluten Practitioner course revolutionizes the way healthcare professionals and coaches diagnose and treat patients suffering from gluten-related disorders. Dr. O’Bryan founded and hosted the world’s first Gluten Summit, theGlutenSummit.com, where he interviewed 29 experts and opinion leaders on the topic of gluten-related health issues. In this issues we dig deep into the causes and solutions regarding autoimmunity, enjoy 🙂

Audio Version

downloaditunesListen to Stitcher Questions we ask in this episode:

  • Why are seeing more diagnosed cases of autoimmunity these days?
  • Are autoimmune diseases life-long conditions?
  • Where do we start on the road to recovery?

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Full Transcript

 Stu

00:00:03 Hey, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition, and welcome to another episode of The Health Sessions. It’s here that we connect with the world’s best experts in health, wellness, and human performance in an attempt to cut through the confusion around what it actually takes to achieve long lasting health. Now I’m sure that’s something that we all strive to have. I certainly do.

00:00:23 Before we get into the show today, you might not know that we make products too. That’s right. We’re into whole food nutrition and have a range of super foods and natural supplements to help support your day. If you are curious, want to find out more, just jump over to our website. That is 180nutrition.com.au and take a look.

00:00:41 Okay, back to the show. This week I’m excited to welcome Dr. Tom O’Bryan. Dr. O’Bryan is an internationally recognized and sought after speaker specializing in wheat, its impact on health, and the development of autoimmune diseases. In this episode, we discuss the potential triggers for autoimmune issues and how simple changes to our modern day living can make a huge difference to our long term health.

00:01:07 There’ll be something for everyone in this interview as we uncover the daily habits that could be impacting our immune systems. Fascinating stuff. Let’s go over to Dr. O’Bryan.

Tom 

00:01:20 Hey.

Stu

00:01:21 Hey guys, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition, and I am delighted to welcome Dr. Tom O’Bryan to the show. Good morning, Dr. O’Bryan.

Tom

00:01:29 Good day to you.

Stu

00:01:31 Fantastic. First up, thank you for sharing your time. Much appreciative. The work you do is unbelievable. We’ve had many requests from you from our listeners on the show. For any of our listeners that haven’t heard about your work, not familiar with you at all, I’d love it if you could just tell us a little bit about what you do and perhaps why you do it?

Tom

00:02:00 Sure. What do I do? Well, our new book will come out in about six weeks. It’s called You Can Fix Your Brain: One Hour a Week To the Best Memory, Productivity, and Sleep You’ve Ever Had. It’s already ranked number one on Amazon under strokes and neurological disease, so that is great that the word’s already getting out there.

00:02:28 This is my second book. The first book came out a couple of years ago called The Autoimmune Fix.

Stu

00:02:33 Okay.

Tom

00:02:35 The basic premise behind the book is that atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries, cardiovascular disease, is considered the number one reason that people die. Is from cardiovascular disease. Well, cardiovascular disease is autoimmune. The atherosclerosis, the plugging up of your pipes, is autoimmune. It’s initiating and fueling phases, it’s autoimmune.

00:03:07 Immunologists have told us for years that autoimmune diseases are the number three cause of getting sick and dying behind cardiovascular disease and cancer. But wait a minute, if cardiovascular disease comes from your pipes plugging up, atherosclerosis, the vast majority of it, and if atherosclerosis is autoimmune, what now becomes the number one mechanism in getting sick and dying in the world today?

Stu

00:03:36 Yeah.

Tom 

00:03:37 It’s your immune system trying to protect you.

Stu

00:03:40 Got it.

Tom

00:03:43 An autoimmune response is when your immune system, which is there to … Mrs. Patient, your immune system is the Armed Forces in your body. Army, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, Navy. IGA, IGG, IGE, IGM, lymphocyte response assay, white blood cells. They’re different branches of the Armed Forces trying to protect you.

00:04:04 So when your immune system begins attacking yourself, the question is, what’s it protecting you from?

Stu

00:04:12 Right.

Tom

00:04:13 What you learn in The Autoimmune Fix, is that it’s not an immune system gone crazy. It’s an immune system working very, very hard to protect you, and because of mechanisms called molecular mimicry and cross reactivity, [inaudible 00:04:30] mechanisms, but because of these mechanisms the immune system, trying to protect you from mercury as an example, mercury toxicity. So if you make antibodies to mercury, then the antibodies that are fighting mercury can in some genetically sensitive people begin attacking your own tissue, and those antibodies attack your heart, or they attack your brain. Then you develop an autoimmune mechanism of the brain. So the question is, why is your immune system activated? When you read The Autoimmune Fix you say, “Wow, that just makes sense.”

00:05:16 Because I quote the studies, and I say, “This guy says this, and this team said this, and this team said that, and here’s the references, go look it up for yourself if you want,” and when you see the scenario you say, “Oh my God, that just makes sense! Of course!” For example, we know that rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis and lupus, that these diseases come about, I’ll say primarily, not exclusively, but primarily because your immune system is attacking parasites that you’ve got, bacterial parasites. Those bacterial parasites look like the collagen on the surface of your joints. So when the immune system is going after the bug Proteus, because you’ve got a Proteus infection in your body, and the immune system’s going after Proteus, it’s looking for a signature of the Proteus bacteria. That signature of amino acids looks a whole lot like the collagen on the surface of your joints. So those antibodies to Proteus may start going after your joints, the collagen of your joints, and you start attacking the collagen of your joints.

00:06:29 I was just at the Autoimmunity Congress in Lisbon about six, seven weeks ago, and Professor Alan Ebringer from King’s College in London, great guy, I really like him, was presenting on Klebsiella. Now we know the bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae, the most common cause of old people in hospitals getting pneumonia is this bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae, but many of us get Klebsiella. You get sinus infections, it might be Klebsiella. You get asthma, you might have Klebsiella. Professor Ebringer was presenting that the antibodies to Klebsiella in 100% of the MS patients they checked, they had elevated antibodies to Klebsiella going after the myelin of their nerves. The myelin is the Saran wrap around your nerves.

Stu

00:07:25 Yes.

Tom

00:07:26 So your immune system is fighting the bug, you got this bug Klebsiella pneumoniae, but if you’re genetically vulnerable, those antibodies might go after the myelin of your nerves and you might get MS.

Stu

00:07:39 Right, I understand. It just seems to me that we’re seeing more diagnosed cases of autoimmunity these days. It’s absurd. I wind it back to when I was a young boy at school in the UK and there were no allergies or sensitivities, or perhaps diagnosed at that time, everybody seemed to be ticking along quite nicely. Now these days, everyone seems to be affected by autoimmunity in some way shape or form. We’ve got it in the family, I’ve got friends with it, I’ve got friends with friends with it, and I just don’t know where it’s coming from. What are your thoughts on this?

Tom

00:08:20 Well, it’s really clear when you see the literature. How do I say this? When I came out of practice in 1980 we called it adult onset type II diabetes. Now you just call it type II diabetes because kids get it as often as adults do. There was no such thing in the 70s and 80s as kids getting type II diabetes. There was no such thing, now it’s all the time. All the time.

00:08:57 I use that as an example of diseases are happening much earlier to more people than ever before, and in the world of autoimmune diseases the number one mechanism of getting sick and dying in the world is an autoimmune mechanism, that mechanism. Why is your immune system getting activated to protect you and as a result it starts going after your own tissue? Why is that happening? Because there’s so many more toxins that we’re exposed to every single day.

Stu

00:09:32 Right.

Tom 

00:09:32 Every single day. In the Journal of Pediatrics they published a paper that showed for every human, for every person in the United States, for every person the average is … make sure I get this straight … 25 pounds of toxic chemicals per person, per day are dumped in the US.

Stu

00:10:01 My word.

Tom

00:10:02 It’s over a billion pounds per person per day are going into the air, into the water, into the soil, into the food, and we’re getting all of that. It sounds strange, but it gives you an example that morticians today use much less embalming fluid than they used 20 years ago. They don’t have to because we’re so full of chemicals.

Stu

00:10:36 Boy, oh boy.

Tom 

00:10:37 We don’t degrade as quickly after we die. That’s weird I know, but it gives you an example of what’s happening in our bodies now all the time. Every newborn child in America has at least 186 toxic chemicals in their bloodstream at birth that aren’t supposed to be there. 186 chemicals. There’s no human on the planet that they’ve checked that doesn’t have bisphenol A in their bloodstream. Bisphenol A is the chemical, is a category of [phalloides 00:11:13] that mold plastic. So your lid on your coffee when you get a coffee to go, the steam from the hot coffee rises and it condenses on the underside of the lid, drips back down into the coffee full of bisphenol A, because it’s a very water soluble compound in plastic. You put the coffee up to your lips and the hot beverage hits the whole underside of the lid, tapers down into the opening full of bisphenol A.

00:11:45 Bisphenol A binds onto your endocrine receptor sites, that means estrogens and testosterones. Now, what’s a receptor site? A receptor site is like a catcher’s mitt. In the US we have this game baseball, and the pitcher throws the ball to the catcher. So receptor sites are like catcher’s mitts. They sit on the outside of cells facing the bloodstream, and your bloodstream is a highway, it’s just a highway. Lots of traffic on the highway, it’s all going in the same direction, but there’s no lanes of traffic, everything’s bouncing around in there.

00:12:22 So how does thyroid hormone get inside a cell? Thyroid hormone, by the way, is the thermostat on the wall in every cell of your body. At nighttime, you turn the thermostat down to save fuel when everybody’s asleep and in the morning it turns on automatically, you program it to turn on automatically to warm up the house before people get up. Thyroid hormone is the thermostat inside every cell. How hot does a cell work? That’s called your metabolism.

Stu

00:12:56 Right, okay.

Tom

00:12:57 It’s all controlled by thyroid hormone. So how does thyroid hormone get inside the cell? You have receptor sites, catcher’s mitts sitting on the outside of the cell facing the bloodstream. Thyroid hormones comes by it, goes right into a thyroid receptor site, which turns the doorknob to open the door and the hormone can go inside the cell.

Stu

00:13:19 Right, okay.

Tom

00:13:21 Thyroid hormone will not go into a testosterone receptor site, or an insulin receptor site. It only goes into a thyroid receptor site. Testosterone goes into testosterone receptor sites. The endocrine receptor sites, estrogens and testosterones, are on cells that love estrogen or need estrogen and cells that love testosterone or need testosterone.

00:13:52 Where am I going with all of this? bisphenol A, this one chemical that I’m talking about right now, binds onto estrogen receptor sites and testosterone receptor sites, but it doesn’t turn the doorknob, it just sits there. It sits there in the receptor site, and if your body can’t detox it and break it down because your detox pathways are compromised, it accumulates in the receptor site. Now testosterone is going by, but it can’t get in the testosterone receptor site because the bisphenol A is stuck there. It’s like the pitcher throws the fastball to the catcher but the baseball bounces out of the catcher’s mitt because he’s got two baseballs in there already.

Stu

00:14:38 Got it, yeah.

Tom

00:14:39 Right?

Stu

00:14:39 Yes.

Tom

00:14:41 What’s the problem with all that? There’s a huge problem. There are two studies I hope to talk about with you, one of them is the one I’ll tell you now. They did a meta analysis, that means they looked at a whole bunch of studies on one subject. They looked at 186 studies, the topic … No, it was 182 studies, the topic was sperm count in healthy men. Not infertile men, in healthy men, between 1974 and 2011. They looked at 182 studies, and what did they find? The average is a 59% reduction in sperm count across the world.

Stu

00:15:27 My word.

Tom

00:15:27 59% reduction in sperm count. Now why would that be? Well, if your testosterone receptor sites are full of bisphenol A and a whole bunch of other chemicals, testosterone can’t get in there to make more sperm. You [inaudible 00:15:43] to make adequate amounts of sperm. Or if it’s an estrogen receptor site that’s loaded full of bisphenol A, women have problems with their hormones, they have hormone irregularities and they can’t figure out why. Or they have thyroid … if it’s sitting in thyroid receptor sites, like chlorine. Everyone should have a chlorine shower filter because chlorine will sit in thyroid receptor sites, specifically thyroid receptors sites, and thyroid hormone can’t get in.

00:16:14 Well, what happens? That’s the woman that gets cold hands and feet, she wears socks to bed, she can’t get up in the morning, wished she had 20 more minutes in bed. Got a little bit of a depressed attitude, can’t lose weight even if she doesn’t eat for three days, all thyroid symptoms, but they do a blood test and her thyroid hormone levels are normal. Because the hormone’s in the bloodstream, but it can’t get into the receptor site to get into the cell. Right?

Stu

00:16:41 Yeah, absolutely.

Tom

00:16:42 These toxic chemicals are interfering with our hormone production, our brain neurotransmitter productions. The amount of toxic chemicals that we’re accumulating is so high now, just the example about low sperm count, 59% reduction in sperm count. What does that mean? Well, scientists worry about extinction of a species at 72%.

Stu

00:17:11 Oh, crikey.

Tom 

00:17:12 We’ve lost 59% in 37 years, from 1974 to 2011, we’ve lost 59%. What do you think is going to happen in the next 20 years? It ain’t going to get better.

Stu

00:17:25 No, no.

Tom

00:17:27 I don’t know if you know, but why did the Roman civilization disappear? It was the lead. It was the lead pipes for water that they did around 400 AD. They built lead pipes, and they used to put lead in the wine. The lead made men infertile, they couldn’t produce enough sperm and the Roman civilization died out. They went extinct.

Stu

00:17:54 That’s fascinating. I haven’t heard that, but of course it makes so much sense when we’re living in a world these days where, I don’t know the particular number, but it was ludicrous what I heard the other day, that the average person has X number of chemicals on their body within 30 minutes of waking up because they’ve showered, they’ve brushed their teeth, they’ve had breakfast and coffee and all that stuff.

Tom

00:18:17 Exactly right. Exactly right. “We can’t do this.””Well, we’ve always done this.” “Well, you’ve always been sick!”

Stu

18:23 Yeah, that’s right.

Tom

00:18:27 Why is it it’s not called adult onset type II diabetes? Because kids are getting it now as frequently as adults. Why is that? Because of all the sugar and the sugar substitutes that have come up in the last 25, 30 years that have blown out your blood sugar regulating system.

00:18:48 It’s so important for me to talk to your generation and say, “Wake up.” Wake up, because you’ve grown up with Clearasil, and you’ve grown up with these shampoos. You read the label, you don’t understand one of the ingredients in there. You can’t make out what any of them are. You think it’s okay because it smells nice. No, no, they made sure it smelled nice so that you would buy it, but those chemicals are toxic.

00:19:14 You cannot use Saran wrap or plastic wrap on food because the phalloides in the plastic wrap leach into the food so that you can’t put your chicken in the refrigerator in plastic containers, because the plastic containers leach plasticizers into the food and it accumulates in your body. You can’t use aluminum foil, because the aluminum foil when you bake it at 165 degrees centigrade, 385 degrees fahrenheit for 90 minutes, the aluminum foil starts breaking down. You can’t see it, it just looks like creases in the aluminum foil, but when you magnify it you see all of these little pieces, hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of little pieces of aluminum that are now in your food.

00:20:04 Just go to Google and type in aluminum and Alzheimer’s. There’s over 400 studies on aluminum and Alzheimer’s, but we keep using aluminum foil. We wrap our sandwiches in aluminum foil, we use plastic containers, we get our hot soup to go from the store in plastic containers, and we’re using all of these things that the industry has said better living through chemistry.

00:20:37 All of these chemicals, now when I was in your age bracket we laughed about that because that meant LSD, better living with chemistry. That was a Montagnard on a bumper sticker in the 1960s, but now it’s bisphenol A, phalloides, the plasticizers, the PCBS and the DDTs that are accumulating in our bodies. Your immune system, just trying to protect you, let’s bring it all back home now, just trying to protect you, your immune system is fighting all of this stuff. Fighting the phalloides, fighting bisphenol A, and because the bisphenol A is inside your receptor site when the immune system attacks it, you damage the tissue of the receptor site. The collateral damage, you damage the tissue of the receptor site, so now your immune system has to make antibodies to get rid of damaged receptor site cells. Clear up the old mess to make room for new cells to regenerate, and you’re making antibodies to receptors.

00:21:38 But you’ve got more of the chlorine coming in, and you make antibodies of chlorine. The antibodies destroy the chlorine if they can, but then you damage the thyroid receptor site, and you make more antibodies for your thyroid as a result. That’s the autoimmune spectrum. I’m trying to give you extremely sophisticated information that most doctors haven’t thought about, and I’m trying to use simple terms so I’m …

Tom 

00:22:00 … have thought about.

Stu

00:22:00 Yes.

Tom 

00:22:01 Now, I’m trying to use simple terms. So I’m not exaggerating but I’m categorizing in ways, so that everybody says, “Oh my God. That just kind of makes sense.”

Stu

00:22:12 Yeah, it does kind of make sense. Absolutely.

Tom 

00:22:15 Yeah, that’s why everyone needs to read the book. Now, what about this thyroid thing? “Mrs. Patient, when you’re in a hotel, and you’re in the elevator of a hotel, and the elevator door is open, can you tell right away the swimming pool’s on that floor?”

Stu

00:22:30 Yes, you can. You can smell it.

Tom 

00:22:32 Oh yeah. You can smell it. But everyone in the elevator can’t smell it. You can because you’re sensitive to chlorine, because you’ve got chlorine accumulation in your body, and likely in your thyroid receptor sites inhibiting your thyroid, and that’s why you can’t lose that last 15 pounds. That’s why you wear socks to bed or that’s why you hit the snooze four times in the morning to get up. It’s because of the chlorine that’s accumulating in your body. So many of our thyroid patients are swimmers. So they’re swimming in a sea of chlorine every day, in a pool of chlorine, or three times a week.

Stu

00:23:08 They’re going back home and they’re drinking water because it’s the right thing to do, which is chlorinated.

Tom

00:23:12 Exactly right.

Stu

00:23:14 And I guess chlorine being antibacterial. Well, what’s happening in our gut, the epicenter of bacteria?

Tom

00:23:21 Exactly right, exactly right.

Stu

00:23:22 Just frightening.

Tom

00:23:23 It’s the cheap way. It’s the cheap way of dealing with the problem, you know?

Stu

00:23:26 Yeah.

Tom

00:23:27 Is using these chemicals. It’s the cheap way, inexpensive way. They’ve made sure that. But they’re making billions and billions of dollars. The health industry is set up around … The health industry is completely set up to deal with, “Well, okay, so you’ve got this problem. Well, take this.” You see it on television, you know, these young guys. They look like Adonis, and they’re bare-chested. And these women that are … These great-looking women. They’re bouncing around. They’re all happy because they take this drug. They’re just all happy. But the boy says, “Warning: This thing may cause cancer. It’ll kill you.”

00:24:04 You hear all of that. But we don’t pay attention to it because we watch, “Oh I want to be happy. So I’ll take that drug because I’ve got those symptoms.”
Stu: 00:24:12 That’s right.

00:24:12 “I’ll take that drug because they’re happy.” And, you don’t pay attention to, “This will kill you. This will kill you.” You don’t pay attention to it. So the whole industry … We’re continually being brainwashed to not deal with the trigger that’s causing the increase in diseases. The trigger is the environment, and we’re at a stage now. This is the second study that I wanted to tell you. The World Wildlife Fund published a study about three years ago now, in conjunction with two major universities, and between 1970 and 2011. The sperm study was 1974 to 2011. So, the same time period now.

00:24:58 So we’re looking at 1970 to 2011. That’s 41 years. There has been on average a 58% reduction in population of all vertebrate species on the planet. Everything with a spine — insects, birds, fish, mammals — 58% across the board in 41 years.
Stu: 00:25:22 My word.

00:25:24 For the birds, it’s 35%. For mammals living near fresh water, it’s 78%. 78% of the porcupines are gone. 78% of the beavers, they’re gone. The mammals that live near freshwater, they’re gone. 78% of them, gone. Why? They’re drinking the water. If you were drinking the water coming out of the stream by your house or the river by your house, you’d get cancer quicker, and you’d be unable to reproduce just like the animals. So 558% across the board of every vertebrate species on the planet in 41 years. Now tied to that, in 37 years, 59% reduction in sperm count in men.

Stu

00:26:11 My word. So given the fact that we are … We’re not-

Tom

00:26:17 I’ll tel you a barrel of good news.

Stu

00:26:21 Well I was going to say we’re clearly not in the best situation because we’re living in a fast-paced environment where we live fast, we eat fast. All of the consumables are wrapped and packed and all of the nasty stuff. Our drinking water is tainted. Our personal hygiene products are tainted. Our vehicles are sprayed and produce God knows how many chemicals. What can we do? What small changes can we make perhaps right now that would have the biggest impact on all of that?

Tom

00:26:53 Really good question, really good question. In the new book … And it’s available on Amazon now by the way. It can be pre- ordered. So please consider it.

Stu

00:27:02 Absolutely.

Tom

00:27:02 It’s a great book. In the new book, I talk about this a lot. Base hits win the ball game in baseball. Base hits, not home runs. Everybody says, “Well I want to take this pill so I feel better today. I don’t have time to be sick. What can I take? What can I take now?” Right? Base hits win the ball game. Here’s an example. When you’re filling your car up with petrol, with gas, can you sometimes smell the gas?

Stu

00:27:32 Yes, always.

Tom

00:27:33 That means you’re downwind and you’re smelling benzene.

Stu

00:27:37 Right.

Tom

00:27:38 Benzene goes right through your nose, into the lungs, into the bloodstream, up to the brain. It’s a neurotoxin. It kills brain cells every time you smell it, not once in a while. Every time you smell it, you’ve just killed off … I don’t know … I’ll make up a number. I don’t know. 5,000 brain cells. You’ve got 17- 18 billion. So you just killed off 5,000. You can’t tell. Every time you smell benzene. I’m making up the number. I’m not sure that’s correct, but it’s something like that. So what do you do? Because you have to pump gas. What do you do? Walk around to the other side of the hose. Now you’re upstream.

Stu

00:28:18 Right.

Tom 

00:28:19 And you’re not smelling it anymore. We just don’t think about that. We just take it for granted. You know, “Oh that gas smell. I really don’t like that smell. It’s not great, but it’s not bad.” No, you’re killing brain cells. So when you start thinking about, “How am I going to reduce my toxic exposures?” You’ll be coming up with things all day. Here’s another one. You go to the coffee shop, and you get your coffee, and I talked about the plastic lid — bisphenol A. You buy four of these.

Stu

00:28:50 Right, of course.

Tom 

00:28:52 Four of them. Four of them. You go and you’re driving to work and you go into the coffee shop. You say, “Fill it up, please.” You use your own stainless steel containers. And, well why four? Well because you put four in a bag in the backseat, and you put them in a bag so they don’t roll around on the floor and clink into each other every time you turn the corner. But you get four of them because you got one. You fill it up. You drive to work, and you come home at night. You bring it in, and you wash it, and it’s sitting in the sink, drying overnight. You go to work in the morning. You forgot it. It’s on the kitchen sink, right?

Stu

00:29:25 Yeah, yeah.
Tom O’Bryan: 00:29:26 “Oh God. I forgot it. Well I need my coffee.” So you go back to the plastic and you’re back suck phthalates again, bisphenol A. So you get four of them because by the time there’s four on the kitchen counter drying, oh yeah, and you’ll put them in a bag, and you’ll put them by your shoes by the door. So you bring them out to the car in the morning, right?

00:29:43 Right. Perfect, perfect.

Tom

00:29:44 And you just have to learn the little things like that. You have to learn. Here’s another one. Especially for your generation, these things. These things.
Stu: 00:29:54 Oh. Yep. That’s a sensitive topic with a lot of people, I tell you.
Tom O’Bryan: 00:29:59 Well, I talk a lot in the book in You Can Fix Your Brain about electromagnetic pollution and radiation and how it kills brain cells. Whether you like it or not, read the studies. But what’s one of the things you can do? This has a case on it. It’s called a Pong. P-O-N-G. It’s a Pong case. It diminishes the electromagnetic leakage from the phone.

Stu

00:30:23 That’s a really good point. Now, I’ve been using one of these things. This is called a Blocsock. After speaking to-

Tom

00:30:32 Yep. There you go.

Stu

00:30:32 … an electromagnetic pollution expert as well, but people don’t realize, do they? Where do they keep their phones as well? In their pocket next to their groin.

Tom

00:30:42 Now, when I’m traveling, I’ve got this in my pocket if I’m walking around. But I’ve got the pong side facing me, right?

Stu

00:30:51 Yes, yes. Yeah, shielding you.

Tom

00:30:53 Shielding, right, and you never use a Bluetooth. Are you kidding me? You can put a battery next to your brain?

Stu

00:31:00 Yeah.

Tom

00:31:01 Just Google. For those that don’t like this, just Google, “What is the percentage increase of brain tumors in people in their 20s?” Guess what Google tells you? Well how come there’s such an increase in brain tumors? Well let’s put a battery next to your brain, and you read one or two studies on this and you see the correlation. The way that these bozos, scientists get away with this stuff is they’ll say things like, ” Well there’s no evidence that the electromagnetic leakage from an iPhone is going to cause a brain tumor.” No, there’s not. But it’s accumulative.

Stu

00:31:39 Yes, that’s right.

Tom 

00:31:40 It’s the little bit of damage that you do today and then the little … There was a study. These kids, these eighth grade kids. I think it was about a year ago, maybe a little more. They were going to sprout some seeds. And so, they did two containers with the same dirt, the same bag that the dirt came from, the same seeds. They put them in and they watered them the same. But one of them they put next to the router, for the wireless in the classroom. The other they put on the other side of the room. They both got the same amount of light. Everything else was the same. The seeds on the other side of the room grew. But the seeds by the router never sprouted. Not at all.

Stu

00:32:27 Oh really?

Tom 

00:32:29 Not at all. You see things like this. You just go, ” Oh my God.” So yes, we’re all going to use cell phones. Yes, we are.

Stu

00:32:34 Yeah.

Tom

00:32:34 Of course, but get a protective case because it’s a base hit. It’s just a base hit, and get a headset, like you and I are using because it’s a base hit. Oh it’s annoyance. I like to have it next to my ear. Yeah, well, I’d like a ’57 Cadillac where it’s convertible. It doesn’t matter what you like. It matters what’s going to help you … healthier, right?
Stu: 00:32:58 Exactly, exactly. So given what you’ve told us about the accumulation of toxins and the cascade of health issues that occur with those toxins, are we looking at a cleanse and a detox as key to try and tackle this issue?

Tom

00:33:17 What we’re looking at is extinction of the species in the next 25 to 30 years. All joking aside, that’s what we’re looking at. Just google, “The sixth extinction,” and read what scientists are saying now that humans are on the verge of going extinct. “Oh that’s just some crazy science,” and we write it off so that we can go to the coffee shop and have our coffee. You know, so that we can live these lives that we’re living. So I don’t want to minimize this by saying, “Do a little detox, and you’re fine.” Absolutely not. Absolutely not. Of course, we need to detox. Yes, we do. Of course, you want to check to see genetically what are you vulnerable to not detoxing very well.

00:34:01 Which pathways are compromised? Of course, you want all that. But there needs to be a paradigm shift. And, how do you get a paradigm shift? It’s when people get bits and pieces of information over time, and they’re applying base hits. Their life changes over time. So when you read the book, You Can Fix Your Brain, and get this concept of base hits win the ball game and then start thinking about base hits around food. Here’s another one. We’ve all heard about the plastic in the oceans. There’s thousands of miles of ocean. They’re just loaded with plastic, and it kills anything that swims through there, right?

00:34:50 So I came home from shopping one day. You take the vegetables out of the plastic bags and put the vegetables in the refrigerator, and you throw the plastic bags away. I’m like, “Why am I wasting all this? I’m going to save these plastic bags.” So I saved all the plastic bags. I put them all in one bag, and I put them by the door. Next time I went to the car, I just put them in the car. “You know what? I’ll just use them again.” I’ll just use them again. Man, what a novel thought. Instead of throwing it away, you’re going to use it again, right?

Stu

00:35:24 It’s a different mindset, isn’t it?

Tom

00:35:26 Yeah, hold on. So, I went shopping. Next time I went shopping, and I got the cart and the vegetable oil. I said, “Oh I left the plastic bags in the car. Oh I’ll get it next time.” And then, “No. Go get it now.” So it took me about a minute and a half to two minutes to walk out to the car and two minutes to walk back with the plastic bag. But it’s type of base-hit thinking, that kind of accepting a little bit of a nuisance to your current lifestyle that we all have to do with everything that we learned about.

Stu

00:36:03 Yeah, and gain, it’s habitual, and like you said, these base hits … I’ll give you an example. Last week, I went to the shops because we’re. making chili for dinner. I needed some mushrooms. So I went into the supermarket. The loose mushroom section was empty. They’d have all been sold. But next to it, they just brought out a great big tray of prepacked mushrooms. So, styrofoam- based, cling-film wrapped. I look to the right. You’ve got these mushrooms that I would really like to eat in my chili. But they’re all wrapped and packed. To the left, the loose ones are empty.

00:36:41 I said to the guy, “Look, can you open up some of these? Because I don’t want to buy the tray and the plastic. It’s just waste.” He said, “No, no. You’ve got to buy them like that.” So I went without mushrooms.

Tom

00:36:52 And you seem to still be alive.

Stu

00:36:56 Yeah, I’m ticking. I’m still ticking. But it’s those choices, isn’t it? And then it’s just awareness.

Tom

00:37:00 Yeah, but here’s the thing. Then you say to that guy, “You know what? I’m not going to buy these because I don’t want to deal with plastic and the container. The more fresh mushrooms you have, the more often I’ll buy them.”

Stu

00:37:14 Yeah, that’s it.

Tom

00:37:16 Or when people go shopping for vegetables, and you go to them. You ask for the produce manager. “Do you have organic broccoli?” “No, we don’t.” “Well how come?” If he gets 10, 15 people a week every week that are taking the three minutes or five minutes to ask the question, eventually they’re going to get the message, and they’re going to start carrying organic broccoli and organic produce because enough people are asking about it. They know they’re going to be able to sell it and make a profit.

Stu

00:37:49 Yeah, exactly.

Tom

00:37:51 So it’s being responsible to do it. I call it paying it forward. There’s this really great movie called Pay it Forward. It’s a real feel-good kind of movie, but it’s about doing something for someone you don’t know just for the sake of doing it. If they say, “Oh thank you.” Say, “Yeah, you’re welcome. Pay it forward.” For example, when I’m driving my car on the highway, if I come up to the toll booth, sometimes if I’m going to a toll booth that’s got a person there to collect the money, I’ll say, “You know what? I’m going to pay for the car behind me and just say, ‘He said pay it forward.'” Pay it and then I just drive off.

Stu

00:38:32 Wow.

Tom 

00:38:33 So the next guy comes up and he’s giving … He says, “Oh no. That guy just paid your toll.” He goes, “What? What?” And he looks. “What? That car in the distance? What?” He said, “And he said to say pay it forward.” The guy drives away. Maybe it’ll impact on him. Maybe not. But how are we ever going to change this world if we don’t be responsible for doing it with the little base hits that we can ourselves?

Stu

00:38:57 Yeah. Perfect advice. So, to one respect to autoimmune diseases, we’re told that they’re lifelong. Okay, so, we’ve got this disease, and we think, “Oh right. Okay. I got it for the rest of my life. I’ve got just a plethora of drugs that I need to take for the rest of my life.” Nothing we can do about it, lifelong. What are your thoughts on that?

Tom

00:39:24 I’m not sure what the word is in Australian, but poppycock.

Stu

00:39:27 Right, yeah. Well similar phrase. Similar over here.

Tom

00:39:30 Okay, okay. When you’re diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, it’s like you’ve fallen over a waterfall, and you’ve crashed into the pond below, and you swim up to the surface, and, “Thank God I’m alive,” right?

Stu

00:39:50 Yeah, yep.

Tom

00:39:51 You’re trying to stay afloat in this pond of rheumatoid arthritis or this pond of multiple sclerosis. You’re trying to stay afloat. But the water is really turbulent because the water keeps falling into the pond. You’re still living the lifestyle that’s caused the problem, right?

Stu

00:39:51 Right.

Tom

00:40:10 So what do you do? Well first thing you do, you have to get a life jacket to stay afloat in the pond. If you try for the life jackets that have the least side effects possible where you feel better and the natural approaches and that type of thing, and that’s the world that I’m in. But if it’s not working, you take the drugs. You take the drugs. Don’t be foolish. But when you’re stabilized, when you’re not going to drown and the moment you’re stabilized, you don’t stay in the pond. You swim over to the side of the pond, get out of the water, walk up the hill, walk back up river, and figure out, “What fell in the river that carried me downstream to where I fell into the pond?”

Stu

00:40:56 Yeah, got it.

Tom

00:40:57 I just did a consultation today for a woman that has three autoimmune diseases, three.

Stu

00:41:03 Wow.

Tom

00:41:05 She was having a hard time. She’s seen many people. She’s got a little better but not much. Everybody’s working on life jackets.

Stu

00:41:13 Yeah, of course.

Tom 

00:41:15 We took the time to go back in the history, and she had forgotten that when she was a child, she broke a thermometer in her mouth.

Stu

00:41:24 Oh right, okay. Mercury.

Tom

00:41:26 Mercury toxicity. Mercury. So likely she’s got … I don’t know for sure. But let’s certainly test to see. For her, that probably is a component of what set it off for her. But you’ve got to go back into the history. You have to go back into your mother’s pregnancy with you. How was your mom’s pregnancy? Did she have to take any antibiotics during the pregnancy? How was the childbirth? Was it a natural childbirth or a ceasarean section? Were you breastfed? All of that makes a huge difference in terms of what you’re dealing with today.

00:42:02 Now, it doesn’t have much to do with the life jacket that’s going to help you feel better in the moment, and you’re being trained. You, meaning all of us. You’re being trained with the autoimmune disease you have and all of those symptoms. Here it is on television for people that have multiple sclerosis. But look over there. There, the gal with the nice body and the Adonis guy, and they’re all happy. But, “Warning this drug may kill you.” That they’re advertising the drugs, so you think taking the drug for your condition is what you need to do. That is not what you need to do. That is what you need to keep you afloat in the pond.

00:42:43 But our job is to get you out of the pound. Get you out of there. But the only way you can get out of there is go back upstream and figure out what fell in the river that carried you downstream.

Stu

00:42:54 Perfect. So when we’re figuring out what fell in the river … And this is going to be a very, I guess, generic question. What tests would be the most useful to determine I guess any number of these external factors that might be compromising us?

Tom

00:43:15 You bet. You bet. Well the first thing to realize is that when you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system’s trying to protect you from something. And so, the question is, what is it that the immune system’s trying to protect me from? From that point of view, then you understand. You have to check environmental toxin accumulation, heavy metal accumulation, food sensitivities, like wheat sensitivity. Gluten sensitivity is notorious for causing autoimmune diseases. Notorious for it. Those are the main categories. It could be musculoskeletal. You could have some problem in your spine that’s contributing to it. It could be electromagnetic. There are four pillars that I talk about that you have to explore.

00:44:00 There are four pillars that I talk about that you have to explore with any autoimmune disease, and it’s all in the book. The four pillars are your biochemistry, what you eat, what you drink, what you breathe in the air.
Tom O’Bryan: 00:44:15 Every child they check now. Every child in Mexico City has evidence of early Alzeheimers. They’ve got markers of brain inflammation already.

Stu

00:44:25 Wow.

Tom

00:44:26 Every child.

Stu

00:44:27 Yeah.

Tom

00:44:27 Because the air pollution is so bad and their breathing this air. All this particulate matter goes through right through the permeable lungs, into the bloodstream, straight up to the brain, causing inflammation in the brain, and your immune system fights these chemicals in the brain, and the result is the collateral damage damages your brain cells, and then your body makes the antibodies to get rid of the damaged brain cells and here comes the inflammatory cascade. There are 146 studies, last time I checked, on the association of Herpes infections and Alzeheimers.

Stu

00:45:04 Really?

Tom

00:45:06 When they look at beta amyloid plaque. The crud in the brain-

Stu

00:45:10 Yep.

Tom

00:45:10 … that causes Alzehemiers. After someone passes and they do autopsy and they look at this beta amyloid plaque. It’s loaded with IGM antibodies to Herpes.

Stu

00:45:23 Right.

Tom

00:45:23 And it’s loaded with antibodies to bacteria. So what current cutting-edge scientists are saying is that your blood brain barrier, the protective mechanism around your brain gets torn. Leaky gut, leaky brain.

Stu

00:45:41 Right.

Tom

00:45:41 When you get a leaky brain, and I walk about it all in the book, the new book. When you get a leaky brain, and these bacteria get into the brain, your immune system fights these bacteria.

00:45:52 Well beta amyloid is not a bad guy. Beta amyloid is a response of the immune system. It’s anti-bacterial and anti-viral. So here comes the beta amyloid grabbing onto that virus, or grabbing onto that bacteria and walling it off. Killing it and walling it off. That’s beta amyloid plaque.

Stu

00:46:15 Yeah. Right.

Tom

00:46:17 So you’ve got to identify what is your immune system trying to protect you from? And so it … I outline in the Autoimmune Fix, we talk about it from an autoimmune concept and in the new book we talk about it from your brain.

00:46:35 What tests do you do? Certainly a very, very important test with any degenerative disease. A critically important test is a comprehensive overview of your microbiome.

Stu

00:46:48 Right. Of course. Yeah.

Tom

00:46:49 Critically important. Critically important. And we find so often the microbiome is way out of balance and that is fueling a lot of the disease mechanism that someone is suffering with.

Stu

00:47:03 Right. Fantastic. [inaudible 00:47:06] I guess clearly the best place to start would be to read the book. Right?

Tom 

00:47:11 You know, my goal is that people start asking a whole lot of questions.

Stu

00:47:16 Yeah, exactly.

Tom 

00:47:18 Your goal is to get the answers from me because your generation wants the answers.

Stu

00:47:23 That’s it.

Tom

00:47:23 I want it now. I want it now.

Stu

00:47:23 Just want it.

Tom

00:47:25 And I’m saying to you, “Wake up!” You aren’t going to get an answer to fix this. You have to understand the mechanism that’s setting it off. And then you start asking the basic questions and there will be a lot of questions. We need a paradigm shift in how we think. And you know, Einstein is given the credit for this statement. “The problems we’ve created today cannot be solved with the same level of thinking that created the problem.”

Stu

00:47:54 Yeah, I’ve heard that.

Tom

00:47:55 We gotta think outside the box. And the next generation, your child, you millennials, just in general, the millennials, their children are the ones that may save the planet because you guys are already all thinking the same. “I want the quick fix. I want it now. I wanna use the makeup that looks really nice here.” Doesn’t matter that it has gluten in it and you’ve got a gluten sensitivity. Lipstick has gluten in it. So many lipsticks have gluten in them. So you go gluten free, but you’re still using the lipstick, you got a problem! Your system doesn’t calm down.

Stu

00:48:31 That’s right.

Tom

00:48:31 So my goal is that the listeners begin asking more questions.

Stu

Yep. Curiosity.

Tom

00:48:40 When you start asking more questions, you start thinking outside your box. When you start thinking outside your box, you’re gonna walk around to the other side of the pump when you’re pumping gas. It’ll just make sense to you. You’re gonna leave your shoes at the door when you come home. Why do you leave your shoes at the door? It’s not some zen Buddhist thing.

00:49:02 It’s that you’re walking home and you walk along the sidewalk, come into your house, your neighbors sprayed the sidewalk with Roundup to kill the weeds yesterday. Now you have Roundup on your shoes. Now you walk in the house with your shoes and now there’s Roundup on the carpet. Now you’re six month old’s crawling around on the carpet just having fun, getting Roundup on their hands and then their arms and then their face and then their body.

Stu

00:49:26 Of course.

Tom

00:49:27 That’s why you leave your shoes at the door is to leave the toxic world outside.

Stu

00:49:31 Yeah.

Tom 

00:49:32 How many people do you know who have been saved? Their lives where saved in a fire because they were sleeping under flame retardant bedding?

Stu:

00:49:43 Yeah. I …

Tom 

00:49:44 What utter nonsense. Utter nonsense. But what you don’t know is that flame retardant sheets and flame retardant comforters outgas these chemicals for years. And what their outgassing is not enough to cause a problem. There’s never been a study … of course all scientists know what outgas is. Well, I wash it. It’s still outgases. It’s inside the fiber. And of course it’s not enough to cause a problem. But it’s another straw. It’s another piece of the puzzle and eventually you get to the straw that broke the camel’s back.

Stu

00:50:21 Yes that’s right.

Tom

00:50:22 So now, you’ve got an auto-immune disease. So, we have to start thinking differently. You can’t buy bedding that has flame retardant chemicals. You can’t buy new shirts that have flame retardant chemicals. You can’t send your clothes to cleaners that are not green cleaners because you’re inhaling all these chemicals.

Stu

00:50:44 Yeah and … yeah.

Tom

00:50:45 It’s the accumulation. It’s the accumulation. Your house cleaning stuff. You can’t have all this house cleaning stuff. One of the most toxic environments is in the kitchen is when the dishwasher’s running because the detergents … Read the list of ingredients in the detergents. And you put under high temperature in a high pressure environment and it outgasses into the air. You’re breathing these chemicals. They go right in. They go right in. So you need green chemicals for your dishwasher. Matter of fact, get rid of the dishwasher. Here’s one for you. One study showed that children that live in homes with no dishwasher have 30% less asthma than the kids that live in dishwasher supplied homes.

Stu

00:51:36 Is that right? My word.

Tom 

00:51:37 30% less asthma and why is that? It’s because when you wash your dishes by hand, sometimes there’s a little crud left on a fork, you don’t see it. Right? And it goes in the silverware drawer and you grab the silverware, put it out and you just, you start eating. Well, you get a little of the crud in your mouth. What’s that doing? It’s working the bacteria in your gut to protect you. It’s working your immune system. You want nice biceps? You need to work out. You want a strong immune system in your gut? You need to work it out.

00:52:08 It’s called the Hygiene Theory and for all of our listeners, if you just Google the Hygiene Theory and read about it, your jaw’s gonna drop, say, “Oh my god. Of course, I’ve been using anti-bacterial soap because that’s what they said to do.” Well, they’re wrong. The anti-bacterials, the sterilization, killing all the bacteria in your hands and on your arms and in your scalp and everywhere … it’s one of the worst things you can do because you’re sterilizing the body.

Stu

00:52:39 Yeah, it’s fascinating-

Tom

00:52:40 Many of you-
Stu: 00:52:42 I was just gonna pop in there. I listened to a podcast yesterday and they were talking about the theories of the importance of microbiome on the skin and how it can be protective for skin cancers and what we’re doing is we are so, I guess anal on becoming super super clean and we’re scrubbing our skin with all this anti-bacterial stuff. We’re actually removing the very protective …

00:53:10 Exactly. That’s exactly right. That’s eye awakening for people. Hopefully they’ll all hear what you’ve just said and get rid of the anti-bacterial soaps. There is no call for them. There is nothing wrong with bacteria. Let me say that again. There is nothing wrong with bacteria. Let me say it differently. There is nothing wrong with bacteria.

Stu

00:53:32 Yeah, I like it. Well, that’s right and perhaps that is why when I was at school nobody had allergies. Nobody … who’d ever heard of an EpiPen. You know? We ate peanuts and we enjoyed eggs and there were no obese children in our school. Perhaps one token guy, but now everywhere, allergies, epi-pens, just sensitivities, asthma, but yeah, you can see and we’re trying to blame one thing. Quite clearly that is not the case.

Tom

00:54:09 That’s correct.

Stu

00:54:10 It’s kind everything isn’t it. Yeah. Fantastic.

Tom

00:54:12 That’s correct. That’s exactly right. We really have to wake up as a culture. We have to wake up because they’re talking about the sixth extinction now.

Stu

00:54:21 Fantastic. Well, all right. So we’re coming up for time. I just wanted to run over the books one more time as well. So, where can we go to get these books?

Tom

00:54:32 Oh thank you. Let’s see. They’re … Amazon, Books-A-Million, Barnes & Noble, and there’s one other I’m not remembering. But the Autoimmune Fix is one of them and the second one is You Can Fix Your Brain.

Stu

00:54:52 Right.

Tom

00:54:52 But that’s in pre-order status right now. It’s been ranked number one in a couple categories, which is very cool, ’cause Amazon will then give it a little more exposure so people can see it which is cool. Very cool.

Stu

00:55:02 Fantastic. We will push all those links out across our audience and share that. I wanna just to hit you at one more question.

Tom

00:55:10 Sure.

Stu

00:55:10 Given the fact that you have accumulated so much knowledge and you clearly have the understanding of the things that we need to change right now. The one percenters that all add up to be much more beneficial to our overall health. What are your non-negotiables? The things that you do every single day to crush your day, to be the best version of yourself and it might be like, “Well, you know, I get up and I drink filtered water.” Things like that. What do you do?

Tom

00:55:42 Yeah, the very first thing I do is go to the bathroom.

Stu

00:55:45 Right.

Tom 

00:55:45 Most people go to the bathroom. Right after that before anything else and I’ve recommended this for 30 years, before anything else, you drink two big glasses of water.

Stu

00:55:55 Right.

Tom

00:55:56 Right away. Before anything else. You need to hydrate. You need to get your body up and running. And I used to be able to give the example of car batteries, you know the battery in an automobile. But no longer, but … Earlier, there were caps on the batteries and you pull the cap off to see, “Is there enough water in there?”

Stu

00:56:14 Yeah, that’s right.

Tom

00:56:15 Because if there’s not enough water, the battery’s gonna die or the power will be very, very limited.

Stu

00:56:21 Yes.

Tom

00:56:21 And your power is very limited when you don’t have enough water, when you’re not hydrated.

Stu

00:56:25 Right.

Tom

00:56:26 So that’s the very … it’s non-negotiable. That’s the very first thing I do every single day.

Stu

00:56:32 Okay.

Tom

00:56:32 Aside from that, there’s nothing else that’s non-negotiable. We also go for organic whenever we can. I travel extensively and it’s really hard sometimes, so I don’t always have access to organic in airports and things like that. But another non-negotiable is no wheat, ever, whatsoever. Not a drop. Never. Ever. Because when you have … if you have a sensitivity to wheat, you give I up and you feel better and you say, “Well, I can have a little once in awhile.”

00:57:09 Well, no you can’t. No you can’t. ‘Cause if you have any exposure to wheat and you have a history of a sensitivity, one exposure and you will have elevated antibodies for three to six months, and that is antibodies to wherever your autoimmune weak link is genetically.

00:57:30 For example, some people with wheat sensitivity, they get brain fog and they get headaches and those are the people that get inflammation in the brain and eventual dementia and things like that. The antibodies are produced to the brain. That’s the genetic weak link they have. So you go gluten-free, and all your antibodies come down … Oh, by the way, autoimmune diseases are … you don’t. You are vulnerable for life, but you stop living the lifestyle that causes it and you often can arrest them and put them into remission.

Stu

00:58:02 Right.

Tom 

00:58:03 Often.

Stu

00:58:04 Great.

Tom 

00:58:04 So you have an exposure to wheat after you’ve been wheat free for awhile. You activate immediately the sentries standing guard in the gut to protect you called dendritic cells. You activate them immediately and you produce antibodies to wheat and if your genetic vulnerability was to your brain, you start producing the antibodies to your brain again.

Stu

00:58:27 Right.

Tom

00:58:27 So you start killing off brain cells again, from one exposure and when you ask immunologists, “How much exposure to a food does it take to reactivate the production of the antibodies to that food?” And they’ll tell you, “One one-thousandth of a gram.” One one-thousandth. I mean, you can’t see it.

Stu

00:58:47 Wow. No.

Tom 

00:58:48 Just like there are some croutons on a salad and you pick the croutons off and you can’t see any crumbs, but they’re there. That’s all it takes and you’ll have elevated antibodies for three to six months to wherever your genetic weak link is.

Stu

00:59:03 Fascinating. It’s almost like a switch isn’t it? It doesn’t-

Tom

00:59:06 It is a switch!

Stu

00:59:07 … matter how much you eat, it’s on or it’s off.

Tom 

00:59:11 That’s right. It’s not a dimmer switch. It’s an on off switch.

Stu

00:59:15 Right. Fantastic advice.

Tom 

00:59:17 So those are the non-negotiables is two glasses of water, no wheat.

Stu

00:59:26 Right.

Tom

00:59:26 Aside from that, I think that’s the only … Oh and to keep working. Keep doing what I do.

Stu

00:59:33 That’s right and just keep paying attention to those base hits, right?

Tom

00:59:40 That’s right. That’s right and keep trying to pay it forward. Just keep trying to pay it forward.

Stu

00:59:43 Brilliant. Well I have really, really enjoyed our chat today and cannot wait to share this for our audience and also dig into those books as well because that’s clearly the key to be able to become more aware of those based hits.

Tom

00:59:57 Exactly. [crosstalk 00:59:59] And to ask the questions, just to learn how to keep asking more questions and the answers will come and realize that you can’t ask a question, “Well, how do I get rid of this?” Or “What do I take to feel better?” That’s important. The life jackets are important, but you won’t get vibrant health with life jacket medicine.

Stu

01:00:20 No. Great advice. And so what’s next for Dr. Tom O’Bryan? What have you got on the radar?

Tom

01:00:29 Ah well, the book comes out in a few weeks and we’ll have our new health summit will come out sometime next year. We did Betrayal and I’m in the interview process now for our new summit and hopefully it’ll be as well received as Betrayal was.

Stu

01:00:48 And I did actually want to ask you a little bit more about that but perhaps that will be for another time because I think that’s gonna be quite a big conversation, because of the magnitude of that particular doco series, which I’ve watched and thoroughly enjoyed.

Tom

01:01:07 By the way, everyone should watch Betrayal. It’s free. It’s completely free and it just changes one’s outlook on autoimmunity completely when … ’cause we interviewed world experts. I traveled, my wife and I traveled to seven different countries, interviewing the experts whose research papers I had read so I knew what questions to ask them.

Stu

01:01:31 Right.

Tom

01:01:32 Then we interviewed the doctors who were applying the principles from the research papers and then we interviewed the patients of the doctors who were complying with the recommendations and reversing their MS.

Stu

01:01:32 My word.

Tom

01:01:46 Reversing their Rheumatoid. Reversing their Psoriasis. You see it again and again and again. You go, “Oh my goodness. Wow. Wow!” It’s very empowering. It’s very empowering to see and what’s possible in terms of your health and there’s this one woman, I’ll never forget her. It was in London and she … we were interviewing her and she said, “You know, I took the Tube to come here today and that’s the train and it’s a seven block walk from the Tube station to here and it’s not a big deal.” And then you see her start tearing up. And she said, ” But it is.”

01:02:32 Because then you see the picture of her two years ago. She couldn’t walk. She was in a wheelchair. She had eight lesions on her brain with Multiple Sclerosis and now she has two lesions left on her brain. We’re reversing the brain damage. And she has no symptoms whatsoever. And when she says that, “But it is.” And she tears up, you just feel it in your heart, you just … right away. And that’s possible for everyone. There is no condition that cannot be helped. You just have to learn what the right questions are that have to be asked.

Stu

01:03:09 Yeah. That’s good advice. So for people that want to learn more about you, your work, your books, Betrayal, where can we send them? What’s the best place to go?
Tom O’Bryan: 01:03:20 Ah. Thank you. Thank you. The website is TheDr.com. The doctor, just don’t spell the word dr out. TheDr.com and it’s all there. The link for Betrayal is there. The link for the Gluten Summit, an earlier one that I had done and the books are there. They’re all there.

01:03:38 Fantastic. Well, look, again, very much appreciative for all of your time and the amazing work that you’ve done as well. It is … our audience will grasp this like never before, like, ’cause I said, we’re surrounded by autoimmunity. We’re surrounded by issues. As you’ve been speaking, I’ve been thinking about my own set up at home and how we’re doing things that can certainly compromise our health every day-

Tom

01:04:06 Marvelous.

Stu

01:04:07 … want to learn more, so thank you so much and I hope to have you on a little bit later on at some stage to talk about your next book.

Tom

01:04:15 Well, thank you so much. It’s a pleasure to be with you.

Stu

01:04:18 Thank you. We’ll chat to you soon.
01:04:20 Bye bye.

 

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