Free Shipping To Australia & NZ For Orders Over $99
WOOCS 2.2.5

Mets Analin – The Biggest Mistakes People Make in the Gym

Watch the full interview below or listen to the full episode on your iPhone HERE.

Stu: This week we welcome Mets Analin to the show. Mets is the CEO of Titan Fitness and has been in the fitness industry for over 21 years. Mets’ ultimate vision and mission is to help transform lives through the very best fitness experience. This is what drives him to get up every morning, his strength is in leading each of his team in pursuit of achieving their goal.

In this interview we discuss the biggest mistakes made in the gym and dive deep into recovery, nutrition, gut health, mindset and so much more, enjoy…

Audio Version

downloaditunesListen to Stitcher Questions we ask in this episode:

  • What are the most common mistakes you see people making in the gym?
  • If we’ve got longevity in mind should we choose cardio vs weights (or both)?
  • Do you recommend a set time limit (ie. no more than 1hr) for optimal training?

Get More of Mets Analin

If you enjoyed this, then we think you’ll enjoy this interview:

Full Transcript

Stu

00:03 Hey, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition and welcome to another episode of The Health Sessions. It’s here that we connect with the world’s best experts in health, wellness, and human performance in an attempt to cut through the confusion around what it actually takes to achieve long lasting health. Now, I’m sure that’s something that we all strive to have. I certainly do.

00:23 Before we get into the show today, you might not know that we make products too. That’s right. We’re into whole food nutrition and have a range of super foods and natural supplements to help support your day. If you are curious, want to find out more, just jump over to our website. That is 180nutrition.com.au, and take a look. Okay. Back to the show.

00:44 This week, I’m excited to welcome Mets Analin. Mets is the co founder of Titan Fitness, a real powerhouse in the fitness industry, with over 20 years in the industry, Mets is the perfect person to explain how to get the best out of our fitness goals. We discussed the biggest mistakes made in the gym and dive deep into recovery, nutrition, gut health, mindset and so much more. Okay. Over to Mets.

01:12 Hey guys, this is Stu from 180 Nutrition, and I am delighted to welcome a good friend today onto the show. It’s Mets Analin. So, Mets, how are you buddy?

Mets

01:22 I’m fantastic, Stu. I just want to say, thank you for this opportunity because I listen to you every week on your podcast. It’s amazing.

Stu

01:31 Well, I’ve been very, very keen to get you on the show because I think you’ve got a whole heap to contribute. And before we get into the questions, for our listeners that might not be familiar with you, I just wondered if you could just tell us a little bit about who you are, what you do and perhaps why you do it as well.

Mets

01:47 Well, I’ve been in the fitness game for over 22 years. Actually owning gyms. This is my third gym with my brother, [inaudible 00:01:56] is my brother, and it’s been quite a journey and definitely learned a lot. I’ve also got a challenge that we do Titan Fit 40, so obviously have that, and obviously Titan Muscle and Mind. So, been in the fitness industry for more than half my life, absolutely love it. I grew up as a kid watching my brother as a 10 year old, so I’m turning 42 this year and it’s just pretty much been in my blood from a young age. It’s huge.

Stu

02:24 42 years, young. That’s all I can say. I’m intrigued because we all know that we should exercise and move in different ways, to be as healthy as we can, and live the best lives that we’ve got. And I’m also aware that a lot of people see exercise as something that they kind of have to do. Like, “Oh, I’ve got to go to the gym, I’m going to get it done and this is going to be good for me.” I think, and I might be wrong, but I’d be interested to discuss this with you as well, that there are a lot of people that are spending a lot of time, a lot of money, and a lot of energy as well, in the gym, during their workouts and perhaps they’re really not getting the results that they need. Perhaps they’re not getting any results at all. So I wanted to talk to you about the most common mistakes that you see people making in the gym. Because I reckon you have the perfect environment and probably the keenest eye to spot these mistakes.

Mets

03:26 The common mistakes that I see a lot of people make is bad technique. So, through their exercises and then what they do, they’ve got bad technique. Another common mistake I see people do is they go and do exercises or they might do certain types of classes or certain type of lifts that the body mechanics isn’t made for. You see some people go to the physio and the chiropractor and because they’re treating a symptom but not the cause of what caused it. If we take that a step back further, we’ve got to look at who’s training them, what protocols are they following? We’re bombarded by so much information on social media and magazines, newsstands, about different fads that come in all the time. So, you take away all the simplicity of actually what it takes to have a properly functioning body. Then people get sucked into, I want to be a cross fitter, I want to be an Olympic lifter, but you haven’t got the body structure to be that person. I see a lot of people that do wrong movements in the gym all the time. And what happens is, you see so many people that follow so many people that are doing it wrong and it just constantly happens, and technique is one of the biggest ones. Even if you ride on a spin bike in a spin class. I’ll break it down simple. You can get in a spin class, if there’s 30 to 35 people in a spin class, it’s almost impossible for that instructor to correct every single person, even just on the spin class because you might be going so fast on the gears that you’re losing the actual momentum of what you need to perform that spin bike with the perfect technique. And then you can hurt yourself, in the simplest form. Right? And I see technique and then exercises that people are doing just because they watched someone online and saying, “I can do it”, but you’re not really ready for it. See this happen so often, and it’s quite frustrating because you can’t get to everyone and not everyone’s going to listen because they’re following this other trainer that looks like this. If that person looks like that, they must know what they’re doing. It’s a misconception. Misconceptions that I see in the fitness industry.

Stu

05:57 It totally is. I remember, and this was a few years, probably three years back when we were into crossfit. And before we even started with crossfit, we had the dow, the wooden dow, like the broomstick. And it was essentially, I want you to go into a squat and put the broom stick or the dow above your head and you just realize that, well, you just couldn’t do it because I tip forward and I just didn’t have that range of motion and movement in my shoulders. And if I guess, another gym hadn’t have done that, but thrown you onto a lightweight to start off with, you could be in a whole world of pain. So I guess it’s that evaluation phase of, well, where are you personally right now in terms of mobility and movement, fitness? What are your goals? Or that kind of thing. It’s very easy just to stumble into a gym, kind of hide away and do your own thing without having that.

Mets

06:53 100 percent. What’s funny is, I was talking to a gentleman the other day, and he was one about mobility to me. And it wasn’t until I really got into gut health, that I understood that you can’t have mobility if your gut is not right. You can do all the mobility work in the world. This is the honest truth, and this is with me, you can do all the mobility work in the world. Right? Constantly. But you’re not fixing the cause of why you’re [inaudible 00:07:21]. Right? Okay. You did the mobility work, 100 percent. I agree with that. But if your gut’s not right, you will not have the mobility that you need to be become mobile, because you’ll just tighten up from the inflammation constantly because it’s the inflammation that slows down the mobility.

Stu

07:35 Fascinating.

Mets

07:38 People are wrong. People are going, I’ve got to do mobility work. Then they [inaudible 00:07:44] because they’re inflamed, because they’re getting all … there’s constant free radicals released. Constantly, constantly, constantly, and then they’re going, let me work on the symptom by stretching and doing mobility work, but doing the mobility work is directly correlated with inflammation.

Stu

08:01 Well, that’s fascinating because I wouldn’t imagine that there would be that many fitness professionals out there right now that would say, “Right. We’re going to have to fix your gut health first.”

Mets

08:12 One million percent. Yeah, that’s the truth, Stu, because I’m the most un-mobile guy you’ll ever make, right? The truth. So when I started looking after my gut, I actually didn’t have to get on the foam roller and stretch as much, and I was more mobile, and I was recovering better. And so when people talk about recovery, and doing all those ice baths, you’re fixing the external, but you’re not fixing the internal. I’m not saying that doesn’t work. You’ve got to do that. But we’re talking about mobility, technique, and everything like that, I can’t even fix your technique if you don’t have mobility. If your mobility is connected to your gut, well, now we’ve got another issue we’ve got to deal with. Let’s go to the cause, let’s go to the symptom. Let’s get to what’s causing the problem. If we fix that, then we can go into mobility.

Stu

09:02 Okay. All right, I’m intrigued. Let’s get into gut health then, in a while, because I’m intrigued to hear what your strategies are to be able to address that as well. So, let’s just say that you’ve got a member and they’re in pretty good shape and their gut health is reasonably robust as well, and you’ve given them an assessment and they’re ready to go. In terms of timing, do I need to come into the gym and flog myself for an hour, two hours, three hours, if I really just want to stay on top of my health, reasonably fit, I want to have lean muscle. I don’t want to bulk up too much. What’s the optimal time for a gym session?

Mets

09:49 What I recommend to people because a lot of people are time poor. What’s the optimal time? I’d say one hour, because everyone is time poor, but if I was to say two hours to you and you’re pretty robust and you’re pretty healthy and I take two hours away. First, I’ve got to look at, are you married, have you got kids, because if I’m taking two hours away, eventually I’m going to have a problem with your spouse, with your kids, because now I’m taking away … If that’s five days a week, I’m taking away 10 hours, plus factor in travel time, I’m taking away a bit more, and if you have a conversation in between, I’m taking a bit more.

10:26 So the way I look at it is, everyone wants time. Everyone’s time poor, so if you do everything right and you focus right, and you look after your nutrition, you only really need around that hour mark. If you came to me and go, “Look, I really want good gains. I want to take my time. I wanna work on a few more things. Maybe I want to work on my recovery and all that kind of stuff.” Okay, let’s focus on an hour and a half. If you’ve got time though, because if I start taking away time from people, I’m affecting a lot of the areas of their lifestyle so we’ve got to be very careful with people’s lifestyle, with their time. But you can, one hour, you can definitely get away with it and get optimum results.

Stu

11:15 Okay. All right. And once you’ve done that, so you’re doing an hour, and I guess dependent on your goals will dictate how many times a week you train. But I’ve come in, I’ve done my training. Your thoughts on recovery? So, how important, tips, strategies, techniques? What are your thoughts? What should we do once we’ve finished in the gym?

Mets

11:38 Well, food is your medicine, right?

Stu

11:40 Yep.

Mets

11:41 For recovery. Right? We’re talking about recovery now. Food is your medicine. I’m not gonna lie because it’s your company, but I have your greens every morning. I have your [inaudible 00:11:51] every morning. I have my vitamin C. I have your hemp protein powder. I can talk for hours just on gut and recovery. When we’re talking about recovery, food is your medicine and it’s really the epicenter of your recovery. If you’re looking for optimum recovery in everything you do, like in everything that you do, whether even if it’s at work, even if you’re not training. Let’s take training away. Even if it’s to perform at your best at work. I believe that food is the biggest part of your recovery. If you want to go a step further into that, definitely cold baths. Hot baths. The sauna is going to definitely help. Massage is definitely gonna help. Using the right chemicals around your house, on your skin, is definitely gonna help. All those are factors that are one million percent that are going to help.

12:43 Also, sleep is going to help with your recovery. So, once I’ve focused on one area, I’ll go, okay, let’s look at every other part of your life and let’s see how we can fix all those elements up. Once we start doing that, what we’re seeing is the optimum human performance of an individual, but we’re seeing an individual that feels so good all the time and what I’m seeing, Stu, in my business and like everyone that I connect with, I’m seeing that anxiety and depression is a massive problem in individuals.

Mets

13:12 And then I look at food is your medicine and recovery is as well. If you’re not recovering and eating well, you’re going to have anxiety and it’s gonna lead to depression as well.

Stu

13:23 Right. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. It’s a bit of an endless cycle as well, isn’t it? Because if you’re eating the wrong foods, then as you mentioned earlier, you are going to feed that low grade inflammation and that might spiral into poor sleep, poor sleep makes you make poorer choices, and you don’t perform as well. You don’t feel like exercising and yeah, ultimately it’s that winding road that isn’t going in the right direction. Yeah, that’s fascinating. I have got a question in here as well and I’m a little bit embarrassed to ask, but we get asked this all the time, so I’m going to ask it anyway. What’s the number one exercise for fat loss?

Mets

14:10 Yes. Everyone want’s the quick fix. What’s the number one exercise for fat loss? Everyone wants one exercise. That one food. Everyone wants that one thing. And this is what I would say to people. Do you like doing HITT? HITT is good for fat loss. Do you like doing spin? Spin is good for fat loss. Do you like doing the stair master? The stair master is good for fat loss. They’re all good. They all have components which are gonna help you and give you as much bang for your buck in that area. For me, I like doing the spin bike and the stair master. I find anything straight where I can take the levels up and down where I can do a little bit of an interval is what I liked the best. If you like doing the treadmill, do the treadmill. What I would suggest though is don’t stick to one thing and over use one thing.

15:05 If you do the treadmill, adjust the angle, go higher on the incline. Pick up the speed, bring the speed down. If you’re doing HITT classes, I would say don’t do too many HITT classes because you’re going to have overuse injury. So then I would say, pick up spin as well mate. If you don’t like spin, maybe there’s the treadmill or the stair master. I try and focus on what you like the most because if I take you, you might not like spin at all Stu, and I start pushing you to spin, you’re not going to come back. If you go “Met, I like running.” I said, “Okay, how many Ks do you run a week?” And you go, “Man, I run 20 ks a week.” I’m just giving you a round number. “How does that make you feel?” “Makes me feel good.” “How’s your joints?” “They’re not the best.” “Okay. What’s your goal?” So I keep breaking it down. I keep stripping it back then I’ll focus on that.

16:01 When people ask me, what’s the one exercise? What do you like doing? You know what I mean? If I find what you like doing, I can maximize you on that one thing.

Stu

16:10 Got It.

Mets

16:11 Make the most out of that. Got it?

Stu

16:13 I think so. It’s very easy I think to just become waylaid with these little barriers that may pop up in terms of well, like you said, I don’t really like spin. Maybe I live 20 minutes away from the gym and I’ve got to get in my car, I’ve got to find a park, got to try and take all these little barriers away. I think just to make it easy and automatic.

Mets

16:41 The goal, let’s the goal. I’ve got to make it as simple as possible, but at the same time I kind of let the individual dictate it, I want it this way. If that way doesn’t work.

Stu

16:52 Yeah, of course, of course. And in terms of … There are so many different disciplines now where exercise is concerned. We’ve seen crossfit and we’ve seen the F45, HITT now is becoming really well studied. From a longevity perspective, I really want to live a long, happy, healthy life. Are you seeing more of a shift to cardio or is it more weights, lifting the heavy stuff?

Mets

17:21 Well, you get this question asked a lot of the time. Should I do more weights, or should I do more cardio? I think they’re both vitally important. The reason I say that is, when I do weights and this is my philosophy and I’m talking about longevity as well, we do one set per exercise, but the focus is just so laser like, right? In that one exercise, because I’m trying to get the perfect set. Because I don’t have a second chance. But if I was to give you a four or five chances on that one exercise, you probably want to be able to perform at your best because by the fourth set, when you want to really nail down and get that set, perfect, by then, you’re pretty exhausted, and your mind’s not there. So from a longevity perspective, the more sets you do per exercise, the greater your chances for, our philosophy, of getting injured.

18:18 Now, you can get overuse, right? Because now we’re talking about longevity, right? When you’re looking from a cardio perspective, if you’re just going hard every day, just on the spin bike and not doing any upper body work, well now you’re going to have some hip issues and knee issues if you don’t use the proper technique for that. Right? Now we’re putting longevity again. So what I try and do is go, okay, how can we perfect everything you’re doing? Minimize the workload, but maximize the output in a shorter amount of time? So I’m giving you as much time now to recover because where you’re to benefit is in the recovery, from a fat loss perspective, from a mindset perspective.

Mets

19:00 … from a fat loss perspective, from a mindset perspective and also putting on muscle. The more muscle you have, the more body fat you burn. Right? I’m looking at how am I going to get the most out of you by not overusing that same workload over and over again, where I know, eventually, you’re just going to break down.

Stu

19:23 No. That’s good advice. The muscle and metabolism and fat loss connection, as well, for all of the females out there listening that might be petrified of becoming really bulky. Your thoughts on that?

Mets

19:43 Never going to happen. Think about it Stu, it’s hard for us to put on muscle.

Stu

19:47 Exactly, right, it’s a struggle.

Mets

19:49 [inaudible 00:19:49] Females have got one tenth of the testosterone as a male so doesn’t matter how hard they go on the weight they will struggle to even keep up with males in that area because just about testosterone levels. What I see, if you’re looking at skeletal muscle mass and bone density resistance work is so important. You know, you just asked me the question before about cardio and weights. Well, if you don’t do weights you’re not going to put on those skeletal muscle mass and have the muscle density to have longevity in life.

20:25 If you don’t do the cardio you’re not going to have the cardiovascular to keep up with just every day events, just by getting in and out of the car, walking up the street, going for a walk with the family and kids. Cardiovascular, you need those two elements to survive and women just aren’t going to get to what a male’s going to get to even though they want to, some females want to, one tenth of the testosterone, it’s almost impossible.

Stu

20:54 Yeah, I think so especially if the focus is fat loss and body composition as well then there are so many benefits to lifting weights slowly, with technique in mind as well because it can change your biology at a very fundamental level and that’s the key. I really do think that pounding the streets day after day after day hoping to be lean, it just doesn’t work. From a scientific perspective that has been the shift that I’ve been subject to over the last five years by talking to different experts on the podcast saying look, we’ve studied this and we’ve just found that the biology shifts that come with lifting heavy weights far outweigh this continual pounding. Also, often times, raising stress hormones in the body for a prolonged period of time and everything that comes out of that as well.

21:57 I guess that’s subject to your own biology and your own make-up. Some people are more predisposed to lifting weights and other people are light and just take to running a little bit better. It’s interesting. Nutrition, what angle do you take with nutrition for your customers given the fact that it’s such a pivotal role for everything, for every aspect of health.

Mets

22:28 Well nutrition is so broad nowadays, Stu. Everyone’s just is overloaded with so much information. There’s macros, there’s micros, there’s keto, there’s vegan, it’s such, how are people supposed to get through that minefield and make a [inaudible 00:22:48]. Invariably you see people make more wrong choices than right choices. I break it down, I probably break it down just in the food sources. You got your protein, you got your carbs and obviously you’ve got your fats. For me, and what’s worked well for me and the people that I’m helping in the challenge and a couple of people that are training with me, from a recovery perspective and from an inflammation perspective is I try and increase what I have to have organically all the time. I’m not going to be able to do that 100% all the time. That’s definitely, it’s got to be on a high point.

23:29 Supplementation is very critical to me. I have 180’s, Glutamine, the hemp protein and then greens. Spirulina and Cholera have been a massive part of my nutrition protocol. My fats are considerably higher than the average person. My protein isn’t massively high, I’m only having three meals a day. If you count fruits as snacks you can count them, I don’t, I just [inaudible 00:24:06] as square meals and obviously just nuts and seeds are very, very vital for me and how I function throughout the whole day.

24:19 This notion of having six to eight to 10 meals, I just don’t believe that. I think overloading your body, I think it’s going to create more stress in the long run to your body. I feel like if you have to think about eating six to eight meals a day are you thinking about anything else, I don’t think so.

Stu

24:34 Probably not.

Mets

24:36 Because you’re consumed by what the next meal is. I think the micronutrient density is more important because if I look from a functionality perspective I’m more functional and more present with a lot of the thing things that I do. I have much more clarity in my mind because I’m having less but the micronutrients are higher and the protocol of what I have in the morning is extremely, extremely important for how it sets me up for the rest of the day. Inflammation, bring down inflammation from food, bring down inflammation from food. Every time I eat I’m thinking about inflammation that I’ve caused by training, environment and what I put in my mouth all the time.

Stu

25:24 Yeah, it’s fascinating.

Mets

25:26 I don’t know if that’s answered the question. I hoped that answered the question.

Stu

25:31 No, look totally, I think more of the whole food approach to eating and nutrient density is always going to win. At the moment they say that we’re starving on an abundance of food because we’re eating so much processed food that is devoid of all the nutrients that we really need.

Mets

25:47 What about if people were eating less [inaudible 00:25:51] would have a lot more food available, of the high nutrient dense foods that we need?

Stu

25:56 Look, it’s definitely, it’s an interesting point. I have quite a fast metabolism and I do eat quite regularly and I always have and I’m super lean but it’s interesting from a biological perspective because last week I went out to an advertising workshop up on the Gold Coast and we had to be there for like five o’clock and it ran till nine thirty and that really screwed up my evening meal. I had to eat before I was picked up to go up to the Gold Coast so I had my evening meal at four o’clock in the afternoon which is unheard of. Normally I’d eat at eight o’clock. By eight o’clock I was really hungry, really hungry and I was thinking I can’t even concentrate I’m so hungry. Strangely, by nine o’clock I wasn’t hungry at all like nothing. I woke up the next morning and I wasn’t hungry. You realize, I think we’re programmed to, with these cravings and also we’ve got these conditional time slots as well, I think oh well, I should be eating now and I should be eating now and I think that’s where fasting plays quite a big role as well. With intermittent fasting and all this stuff you’re turning off these signals that ultimately perhaps lead you to a meal you didn’t need or didn’t even want. I’m really interested. Often times that comes about from eating more healthy fats because you’re more satiated and just dropping back on these processed carbs that keep you in that spiral of needing the next meal. Yeah, I completely agree with you. It’s fascinating, fascinating stuff.

27:47 You mentioned supplements, Al Glutamine and Cholera and Spirulina and Greens and things like that. Are those your top three recommendations perhaps for a new customer that would come through and say, “Look, I eat okay, I’m looking to pickup a training protocol, should I be taking anything specific?”

Mets

28:12 [inaudible 00:28:12]. Those three supplements that I just said before, like Cholera, Spirulina, I do have your Glutamine, I do have your Greens, you said three? I would definitely have to say Cholera, Spirulina and the Glutamine. I know in your Greens you have that as well, you have all of those things which his unbelievable, which is fantastic. I like to have an insurance policy as well, just for me and I know it’s been helping me a lot Stu. Honestly I can’t tell you how those supplements have changed and strengthened me in the gym, my recovery, just my chronic pain just in the knee, in the shoulders, the elbows and the hips. Sometimes for me I go my hips should feel worse because it’s a habit of how it’s felt for so many years. My shoulder should feel worse because it’s a habit of how it’s felt for years.

29:12 When you start having those supplements and combining the right supplements you go, “I should have never felt that way but I just wasn’t doing the right things.”

Stu

29:24 Absolutely, I guess getting back to gut health as well, all has an impact, it’s all connected, it all starts in the gut and often times it’s what we don’t eat that plays a bit part in the way that we feel as well. I wanted just to talk now about your journey with gut health. I’m guessing what you’ve done and the success that you’ve had in the way that you feel and you’ve changed your diet you’re going to share with your community as well. What led you to, I guess, want to understand the gut and do something about it in more detail?

Mets

30:07 My father’s death led me to gut health because if you’ve got cancer, it’s from the gut. We had a friend, we were lucky, we were fortunate enough to have a friend whose mother died of leukemia, father had cancer and dad was, he only had at that time, four or five weeks to live but we didn’t know that. She came with this protocol of everything that had to do with gut health, everything. She said there’s two places to go, there’s a place in England and there’s a naturopath in the city called Newton’s, go get all these vitamins and supplements, these are the brands, these are the right ones.

Stu

30:54 Yes.

Mets

30:55 He’d already done two years of study on all this, just spent two years watching the best cancer functional medicinal doctors around the world, gave us all the links. It’s like when someone’s got a gun to your head, you’ve got to learn fast that’s [inaudible 00:31:12]. We went to Nimburn and we got CBD and all that kind of stuff that dad needed but more importantly there was a naturopath there who had, who is in remission from brain cancer and gut cancer and he gave us this protocol and we went and pretty much followed that whole protocol and it was a lot, it was a lot Stu, I’ll be honest with you, not many people can do that much. We were doing that for dad but we were also doing it for ourselves at that time.

31:47 I’ll give you a quick story about my brother. This is what’s going to amaze you. I’ll just [inaudible 00:31:53]. My brother had an antifungal nail that was damaged for 13 years. Ever since dad passed away we’ve been following that protocol, gut health, that nail is now perfect after 13 years of being damaged so it shows you what it does from the inside to your nails, to your hair, to everything, how it just regenerates constantly. I look at gut health as constantly self cleansing, it’s [inaudible 00:32:24] and cleanse and your body needs that because of what we’re exposed to.

32:29 I was listening to one of your podcasts about wifi, the phone and everything that we’re exposed to like so much more exposure, foods processed more than ever, you’re seeing more anxiety and depression more than ever, you’re seeing more cancer than ever, dementia, Alzheimer, everything and you’ve got to ask yourself the question, like common sense, is food the problem, is it really affecting us that much? I truly believe it is and I know you do as well. There’s two things you can do when anyone’s passing away, you can just watch them pass away or you can learn from it and then live, your legacy lives through them. My greatest advantage, and I tell this to everyone, is my dad because when I’m thinking of going off course he’s telling me not to because if it wasn’t for him, Stu, I wouldn’t have taken it to this next point. I can’t tell you how much better my brother and I are feeling.

Mets

33:38 My brother had [inaudible 00:33:40] for five years and he took every medication there was and nothing fixed him up and he was in immense pain. I even think he had a leaky gut, it was pretty bad. Now this is a guy that always looked great but it didn’t matter how good you looked on the outside it was the affect it was having on the inside. [inaudible 00:34:02], five months down, he’s probably been in the best health he’s ever been in. People go like cheat meals and that, why would I want to put anything in my body that is processed when I know what I used to feel like?

Stu

34:16 Yeah.

Mets

34:17 When the people [inaudible 00:34:18] and the few people that are following us are feeling the same, we’re getting rid of chronic pain through this nutrition program. I believe, and I’m not holding anything in the past with my dad, I believe if we got it early enough and we had more of a chance, I think things could have possibly been different but that’s where it all started. That was the nucleus of it and that cause there will be with me forever and that’s where I’m taking everything to, everything that we do on Time Fitness, that’s our journey, that’s our legacy and everyone in the world’s going to need what we do through that.

Stu

34:58 It’s fascinating, isn’t it? I think it’s not, often it’s not until you experience pain of any level that you actually think something has to change, it absolutely has to change. I know that last year I lost my mother to Louis Bodies disease which is similar to Alzheimer’s, a neuro degenerative disease and that took me on a path of education and discovery to want to find out why this was happening because it seemed to be that we’re experiencing these conditions now at a much younger age, much earlier in our lives than previously. After speaking to a number of experts around the world it became evident that there are so many different areas that you need to address to be able to have the best fighting chance of a longer and healthy life. Yes, there’s gut health, there’s movement, there is stress and sleep and drinking the right quality water that isn’t full of all these crazy chemicals that then attacks the gut and it all runs on from there. It’s not one thing.

36:18 Yeah, definitely, it is a constant process I think and we’re constantly finding out new stuff but as you said before, get your sleep right, work on food, try and eat as much organic as you can, reduce the processed stuff, get more nutrients into every meal and every day, you’re going to be on that right path. But one thing that we haven’t spoken that I’m really keen to because I know that you’re quite big on this is mindset. What are your thoughts on mindset and how can we shift our mindset if we want to really maximize our goals but we’re coming from maybe a place that isn’t, maybe a darker place because we’re just feeling low, we’re not feeling inspired, we don’t really want to do any of this stuff that we know that we should do, what are your thoughts on that?

Mets

37:11 Let’s talk about how to maximize your mindset to reach your goals. I’ll give you this analogy and I’ll start with you straight away. I want to be a cyclist but I’m hanging out with guys that play touch footie and that go to the pub but I want to be a cyclist. Now, that’s all environment. I want to be a cyclist, I’ve got to be around cyclists, I’ve got to look at what bikes they get, who they get their bikes from. I’ve got to look at who their physios are and who helps them with their recovery and nutrition and I have to focus on what that community looks like and now, now I can be a good cyclist but I definitely can’t be in the environment around …

38:00 But I definitely can’t be in the environment around my mates that are playing touch footy and going to the pub all the time. Now I want to achieve goals, I want these big goals. I want to become the best at it.

38:15 So now let’s go back to me. I want to be the best in the fitness industry. I want to work with the best people that work with gut health supplements. In the truest essence, right? So now I have to surround myself with those types of people. Right?

Stu

38:30 Yeah.

Mets

38:30 And I have to get around people that are better than me in certain areas because I need to be challenged. Right?

38:36 So when you’re looking from a standpoint of mindset, you need to surround yourself with those that are gonna make you feel uncomfortable with the goal that you set yourself, and you have to remove those people around you that are holding you back from the path that you want to go down.

38:54 And I’ll go back to this, right? People go, “That’s hard. I don’t want to do it. I want to have to fun in my 20’s. I want to have fun in my 40’s right? I want to take it easy.” You know, you get to a point in life, and I see this a lot in the 40 and 50 year olds, right? That they wanted to have the fun but now it’s time to work, but they don’t have the confidence. Because they’re always [inaudible 00:39:16] themselves with the wrong people throughout their whole journey. Now they’ve lost their confidence because they’ve stopped learning. And as soon as you stopped learning, you will lose your confidence.

39:28 So like this, Stu, if I want to learn about gut health, I better listen to all the best gut doctors in the world. Then I [inaudible 00:39:35] the practitioner, because it’s no good for me now to be the cyclist and just watch the Tour de France all the time and go, “I wanna be a great cyclist because I watch Tour de France.”

39:46 I’m not the practitioner now. You gotta practice what you preach as well. So if I want to learn about gut health and I just talk about it … I’m a naturopath right now, and all I’m telling you is [inaudible 00:39:57] to take everything but I’m having maccas and KFC. [inaudible 00:40:02] says to me.

40:03 I wanna see the guy that’s actually practicing it and that’s doing it on themselves and doing it within their community as well. If I wanna reach my goals, I better be around the right environment, otherwise I’m gonna lose in life and that’s the truth. If you want the truth, that’s the truth. I will not get to my goals.

40:24 This is where depression and anxiety come into it because now you’re giving up every time you go into that community you’re getting uncomfortable and then you’re going back. You’re going back to this set point which made you comfortable, but you’re unhappy with. Now you go back into the uncomfortable environment, you like it, but it’s uncomfortable. It will happen all the time. If you train on the [inaudible 00:40:48] you come with me, I am gonna make you feel uncomfortable but you are getting engaged, happy at the end because now you’ve achieved something.

40:56 We get uncomfortable. We achieve something. We feel better. When I say to people, “Your environment will dictate your happiness. It will dictate your results. It will dictate your goals, but it won’t be comfortable all the time. You will have wins and you will have losses in that environment as well.”

Stu

41:16 Mate, that’s great advice, and I think from my end it seems to be very clear that you’ve injected that mindset into your business because from a social media perspective and everything that I see coming out of Titan Fitness as well, it’s very ethos driven. You’ve got goals and missions, and everybody’s having fun but they’re working hard to want to better themselves as well. And totally when you say it, “Surround yourself with people that you want to be like, aspire to be like as well.” And yes, if you want change, then you’re going to have to change something yourself. You can’t just expect it to happen. So no, that is great advice.

42:02 I wanted just to touch on, you guys, you specifically you run your own podcast called “The Muscle and Mind Podcast.” What can we expect if we dial into that?

Mets

42:15 Well, Stu, when I first started, and it’s like you when you started your own podcast. [inaudible 00:42:22] a lot at the start.

Stu

42:22 Yes.

Mets

42:23 And the way you ask the questions, the way you layer it. How to make the guests feel like … And to be perfectly honest I reckon I sucked early on. I reckon I [inaudible 00:42:33] wrong guests. You know what I mean? That’s being honest. Like if I want to be honest, I’ll put my hand up if I didn’t do it the right way.

42:41 And more likely than not when you’re starting something new, unless you start doing it, you’re not that good at it.

Stu

42:49 That’s right.

Mets

42:51 Probably the last ten episodes I’ve invited better guests on. And I reckon before that I didn’t. And what I like doing with my own podcast and where I’m taking it is, I want to bring people that are in that sporting arena, that are coaches, that are mindset driven, that are disciplinarians, that people can go, “Wow. If I do this. They’re giving me tools, and they were just like me. And if I’m more disciplined, I can get those results in time.”

Stu

43:18 Yeah.

Mets

43:19 I want to bring people on that have been through obstacles and challenges and come out the other end. I feel like that sometimes you have to involve the right guests that have achieved something. Twenty years down the track and most of them have. Early on I think I invited too many people that hadn’t achieved anything, you know what I mean?

Stu

43:37 Yeah.

Mets

43:38 I was doing it for the sake of doing it. I had to ask myself, the essence of the whole podcast is [Titan 00:43:46] muscle and mind. You need the muscle. You need skeletal muscle mass. You need the muscle to feel confident. You need the right foods to have the muscle, but you also need the right mindset to then take control of your life. And that’s really the essence of it. And I reckon maybe I did get it a little wrong early on, but now I’m inviting the type of guests that train hard and that have the right mindset to become the best versions of themselves.

Stu

44:19 Yup.

Mets

44:22 Now I’m starting to invite the right people, and I want to have you back on. I didn’t feel like I was at my best when I had you on. And we’ll do it via Skype this time.

Stu

44:31 Right. I would be honored. Absolutely. I think-

Mets

44:35 The thing is, Stu, and I wanted to mention this. If I look at where we were from that first podcast to where you are now. And this is only like eight months, nine months ago. Right? To where we are now, man, I’m completely different. Because I wasn’t talking about gut health back then.

Stu

44:53 No, that’s right. Yeah, it’s-

Mets

44:55 I’m not any less of a person. My expectations of me and who I bring on now are much higher as well.

Stu

45:03 I think so, and I always love … You mentioned earlier, if you’re the smartest guy in the room you’ve got problems. You’ve got real problems. So it’s great to be able to connect with people like you, experts in their given field. And if I can come away with just one thing, one little nugget of wisdom out of each show then that’s a success for me. It’s just a great experience to be able to learn about things that perhaps wouldn’t have even been on your radar.

45:38 I remember that we had a lady called Nicole [Belsmer 00:47:05] on about three months, and she was a home biologist, so it was all about healthy homes. And the biggest take-home for me with that particular episode was she said, “Well, if I want to fix anybody’s health I would start with the water that they’re drinking.” I said, “Why, and where would you start?”

Mets

46:08 [inaudible 00:46:08] I like it. Keep going.

Stu

46:09 I mean, yeah, it was fantastic. And she said, “Well, 99% of us are drinking tap water and tap water contains chlorine, and what’s chlorine?” And I said, “Well, it’s an antibacterial.” And she said, “Well, you’re drinking an antibacterial, and it’s going into your gut that’s full of bacteria. What do you think’s happening?” And that just was like penny dropped. “Of course!” So that is just one of these little areas that just chips away continually at the quality of your gut health and the bacteria and things like that. And yeah, it’s just one thing. And if you can pass that on to other people and they go, “Oh. You know what. I’m going to get a filter on my tap.” That’s just one tiny little facet of information that could make a huge different to them.

Mets

46:58 So yeah, I love it. Just dialing into these people and finding out what their passion is and why and learning from it as well which is a real blessing.

Stu

47:12 So mate we are slowly coming up on time, so I ask a question at the end of each podcast, and it’s about you. So personally. And your nonnegotiables to ensure that you crush each and every day. And it might be things like I get up and I drink a big glass of water with lemon or I do some yoga or I write in a journal. What do you do every single day without fail that sets you up for the day?
Mets: 47:41 I get around 4:30 am. I make sure that I get my morning drinks right, and one of them’s your one. The 180 grains with the mineral water and the glutamine. I also will have a little chlorella on its own. Just a little bit. And I also make sure I have my lion’s mane, and I get in at least one to two glasses of ph water that I’ve got connected at home.

48:14 Then I get ready to go to the gym. I want to start my day off on the right track. I want to get my morning nutrition right. My drinks. And then I want to get to the gym. And once I get that I’m set up for the rest of the day because now I’ve got the right energy, and I also make sure my breakfast right after the gym is perfect. Now I control the day. I own the day because I took the leadership within myself to make sure that I get myself right. If I’m right, that means I can take the day and whatever problems come my way.

Stu

48:49 Yeah. No, that’s great advice. Fantastic. How you getting on with your lion’s mane, out of interest?

Mets

48:55 Unbelievable. You know, look. I got that from you. Your podcast.

Stu

48:59 Yeah. Yeah.

Mets

49:01 I just feel I’m heaps smarter than I used to be. It’s funny. I’ve given it to a couple of guys, as well.

Stu

49:09 Yes.

Mets

49:09 And they can’t believe it. But obviously I’ve been them the morning protocol as well because when I get home after my workout, I’ll have M priming powder, and then my chia seeds and my [inaudible 00:49:27] and all that in there. Once I have that I’m pretty much set. And I get my vitamins, make sure vitamin C in. And then I’m set up for the day because I’ve got this real clean energy for the rest of the day. But the lion’s mane. That’s like a wonder drug, yeah?

Stu

49:43 Yeah.

Mets

49:43 Unbelievable.

Stu

49:44 Yeah, it’s fascinating. No. Because we’re having a chat to Jeff Chilton whose mushroom expert over in the States.

Mets

49:53 Was it good?

Stu

49:57 Yeah. Fascinating. And he said, ” Look. There are a couple of mushroom supplements that are real game changers. One is lion’s mane for cognition and one was reishi for overall health.” And so he sent me a couple of jars of both of each of those supplements. And yes, the lion’s mane, it just makes you feel sharper.

Mets

50:26 He’s probably the best one. He’s been doing it since the 70’s, he said.

Stu

50:30 Yep. So there are some thing that you need to be wary of when buying mushroom supplements, and that is that it’s quite likely that many supplements containing mushrooms will be contaminated with gluten because of the mycelium that they’re grown in which is grain fed. And so I did have a brand over here that I’d bought from a local health food store. And then I tried is, and yeah, his ones felt very, very different. They felt much cleaner. Like zero bloating and anything like that. It was an interesting journey, but I just think mushrooms do have so much to offer. And when you get everything else right. Like you said, you’re starting with this boast of nutrients in the morning. You’ve had a good sleep. You’re hydrating yourself with good, clean water. You’re working exercise into your day, and you’re taking some supplementation for cognition as well then you’re on to a winning protocol for sure.

Mets

51:34 I’ve never [inaudible 00:51:37] better shape. My sleep’s been the best it’s ever been.

Stu

51:38 And yeah that is so important, so vitally important. I mean that’s a podcast on it’s own. We’re talking about sleep. And I’m fascinated with sleep because I have battled with sleep for so long. Since we’ve had children basically. And since I run my own business I think as well because your mind never switches off.

Mets

51:59 Never.

Stu

52:01 When you have a good night’s sleep, “Boy oh boy. Do you know it.” Fantastic.

Mets

52:07 Yeah.

Stu

52:07 What’s next for you? What’s next for Titan? What’s in the pipeline?

Mets

52:14 Well look, Stu, this journey that I’m on with gut health and obviously it’s maximum human performance, and if you ask me what’s next for Titan Fitness, I want to make Titan Fit 40 one of the biggest challenges in the world and I feel like we’re through the media and through so many supplement companies, we’re so misled with supplementation and food. I just want to show people the true and the real way, and I’ll do it through helping people alleviate their pain, having better sleep, right? Having less stress and anxiety in their lives and I want to do that through nutrition and training.

52:53 And I truly believe because I can see what’s happening to me. I can see what’s happening to my brother, and I [inaudible 00:53:00] that are around us that we’re actually training. I want the Titan Fit 40 challenge with training protocols with your nutrition programs, and a lot of it’s linked to you guys anyway to be the biggest in the world. I believe every single individual in the world needs what we have, and that’s where my crusade is. I don’t want to put any other companies down, but I would say 99.9% aren’t doing the best job to help people. I really mean that.

53:38 You know what I love about your podcast, is I take and I listen to all your podcasts, and I take something away from all of them and practice them. I actually put myself into practice. I’m looking at my performance. Am I waking up fresher every day? Is my shoulder, my joints, better every day? Are my lifts getting better every day? Am I more efficient at work? Is my message more clearer? I’m looking at all these different spectrums of just these little tests I do on myself every day. I believe that with what we’re doing and the people that we’re working with, I reckon we can connect with the whole world. I’m getting amazing results from some of the people that I’m training. Like they just can’t believe it.

Stu

54:24 Fantastic. Fantastic.

Mets

54:26 And sometimes I can’t believe some of their results so fast as well.

Stu

54:29 Well, mate that is exciting stuff. So for anybody that wants to find out more about what you’re doing, where would we send them? What’s the best place.

Mets

54:38 Obviously you can find me on Titan Muscle and Mind. We’ve got our youtube channel. Titan Fitness Raw. I think it’s Titan Fitness. You can find me on Titan Mets on Instagram and on Facebook and you can also find me at titanfitness.com.au

Stu

54:56 Great.

Mets

54:56 So everything Titan Fitness.

Stu

54:57 Fantastic. Okay, mate. Well, look, what we’ll do. We will link to all of those in the show notes, and we’ll distribute this and make sure everybody knows how to get in touch and to reach out.

Mets

55:08 One thing, Stu, is anyone wants to ask me questions or stop me or whatever, you know you can email me, you can send something to Titan Fitness. I will get back to them. I will answer the questions. I give up so much of my time for people because I think what we have, everyone needs. You can bother me whenever you want, and I will do my best to get back to you.

Stu

55:31 Fantastic. Well, mate, you are an absolute legend in the fitness industry. Yeah, very, very excited about catching up with you soon as well. So what we’ll do is we’ll link and put the show notes and all the audio stuff and the video and share this across our audience, and hopefully we’ll be catching up some time soon. But thank you so much for your time today. Really appreciate it, mate.

Mets

55:54 Appreciate it. Thanks.

Stu

55:56 Cool. Thank you, mate. Bye, bye!

  • Share:

    Want More Articles Like This?

    Sign-up for the 180 Nutrition mailing list to receive the latest news and updates.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *